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Absenteeism plagues Richmond County schools

Saturday, Sept. 22, 2012 9:37 PM
Last updated Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2012 2:46 PM
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Editor's Note: Because of a reporter's error, the numbers and percentages of chronically absent students were incorrectly reported in a previous version of this story. The story has been changed to reflect this. The Chronicle regrets the errors. 

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Garrett Elementary School Principal Paula Kaminski and teacher Tiffany Shelton pass out award certificates to pupils with perfect attendance. Last year nearly a third of the school's pupils were absent for four weeks.  MICHAEL HOLAHAN/STAFF
MICHAEL HOLAHAN/STAFF
Garrett Elementary School Principal Paula Kaminski and teacher Tiffany Shelton pass out award certificates to pupils with perfect attendance. Last year nearly a third of the school's pupils were absent for four weeks.

A vital part of the classroom is missing in many Richmond County schools: the student.

Through the state’s Open Records law, The Augusta Chron­icle obtained 1.36 million attendance records for students enrolled in the most recently available school years in Richmond, Columbia, Burke and five other school systems in Georgia.

In the 2010-11 school year, 11 to 28 percent of the students at some Richmond County schools were chronically absent – defined by the state Department of Edu­cation as missing at least 15 days of school.

The numbers show that Richmond County students miss hundreds of hours of instruction time, do poorly on annual tests and often fail to graduate.

But school and legal officials with whom The Chronicle shared its analysis had no idea how many students are chronically absent, with 15 or more days in excused or unexcused absences, or how many have been truant, students with more than five unexcused absences.

The percent of chronically absent students in 20 of the 56 Richmond County schools is above the state average of 10 percent, and the system’s overall truancy rate is twice as high as the state average.

In 2010-11, 27 percent of the students at T.W. Josey High School missed more than 15 days of school. At the end of the school year, only 46.7 percent of the seniors graduated, according to the state.

Josey Principal Ronald Wiggins said, however, that attendance data don’t tell the whole story of his school, where many students live in poverty and broken homes and have challenges that contribute to unexcused absences.

“If I live with my mom and she’s on drugs and I never see her, who’s going to write my (excuse) note?” he said.

During the same year, 41 percent of the students at Craig Houghton Elementary School were truant, and its test scores for math and science rank at the bottom of all schools in the county. Though a majority of the students passed their tests for social studies and reading, only 36 percent passed the science test. Nearly half failed math.

Truancy laws

According to state law, the chief Superior Court judge of every district was required to form an attendance committee in 2005 composed of representatives of the school board, law enforcement, county board of health, Juvenile Court judges and about 10 others. The Richmond County committee formed in 2005, but members have not met twice a year to discuss attendance issues and solutions, as the law requires.

Some individuals who are required to be part of the committee, such as Sheriff Ronnie Strength, were not even aware it existed.

Superintendent Frank Roberson said that school system personnel are doing everything required to combat absenteeism but that they cannot substitute for parents.

At the district level, the truancy protocol requires that a school social worker make a home visit after an elementary or middle school pupil’s fourth unexcused absence and after a high school student’s fifth one.

If the problem persists after social workers intervene, the school system is required to refer a student to the Department of Juvenile Justice. DJJ is then responsible for making referrals to Juvenile Court, although that step is rarely taken, data show.

In the 2010-11 school year, the Richmond County school system referred 199 cases to DJJ, but Juvenile Court Chief Judge Ben Allen’s court saw none of those. The next school year, the district referred 64 cases, and only two were seen in Allen’s court.

For the past four years, Allen, who was not reappointed this month to another four-year term by the Superior Court judges, was in charge of truancy hearings. In a recent interview, Allen said the school system, which has social workers, counselors and psychiatrists,
should handle and resolve truancy cases – not the underfunded court.

“The court putting people in jail doesn’t solve anything when it comes to truancy,” Allen said. “If we put the parents in jail, who’s going to get the child ready for school? If we put the child in jail, then he’s not going to school.”

Graduation rate

Although 8,357 students were truant in 2010-11, Allen said truancy is not necessarily a problem in Richmond County. He said numbers reported to the Georgia Department of Education are probably inflated because students are given one unexcused absence when they accumulate 10 tardies.

Attendance isn’t equal to quality education, he said. Allen told a story of a high school senior who graduated at the top of her class after missing 20 to 40 days of school.

“She was just bored,” Allen said.

The hard data show she was an exception, however.

According to The Chron­icle’s analysis, 53.3 percent of the seniors at Josey failed to graduate in 2010-11. Nearly 20 percent of the students at Josey missed a month or more of classes

What’s happening at Josey is emblematic of a problem throughout the school system. For instance, at Butler High School in 2010-11, 28 percent of students missed 15 or more days. At the end of the year, 52.7 percent of the senior class failed to graduate.
By comparison, fewer than 3 percent of students at John S. Davidson Fine Arts Magnet School and fewer than 1 percent at A.R. John­son Health Science and En­gineering Magnet High School missed that much school during the same year. At graduation, every senior could walk across the stage and claim a diploma.

That’s the answer – magnet schools, said Richmond County Superior Court Judge Daniel J. Craig.

“We’ve known the key to success in education in Augusta for 30 years,” Craig said. “We know it works, so why can’t we do it … instead of insisting on one-size-fits-all and then scratching our heads over and over again when it fails.”

Attendance at the magnet schools is nearly perfect because the students are empowered, engaged and excited about going to school, Craig said. Instead of four magnet schools and 52 traditional ones, Craig said, the district should reverse that number.

Possible fixes

It won’t change without real leadership in the school system’s positions of power, Craig said.

The Richmond County school leadership believes the attendance problem lies at the feet of parents and, secondarily, the community.

“This is another area where the school system is expected to take over the role as a parent,” said Richmond County Board of Education President Alex Howard. “We can’t police parents all the time on something like this. … The parents have to step up and get involved.”

Roberson said the schools are doing their part to get kids in class.

“The real key to this issue is at the parental level in terms of resolving it,” Roberson said. “One thousand years ago, when I was a boy, that was in place – aunts, uncles and grandparents and community people were very much engaged in the family, especially where there were young children. We stopped talking about that, and we stopped doing that.”

In Richmond County, Howard and board member Frank Dolan said they were unaware of the truancy problem but said parents, not the school system, must intervene.

“Our job is to teach kids, not raise them,” Howard said. “We can offer the services, the guidance, but if they’re not coming to school, what can we do?”

Dolan said he believes government is to blame, that poor people are encouraged through welfare to have more children they won’t take care of, and in turn, not send to school. Punitive recourse would be a wake-up call to most parents of truant kids, he said.

“Put them in jail for the weekend and put the kid in YDC (Youth Detention Center),” Dolan suggested.

Juvenile Court Judges Doug Flanagan and Willie Saunders, who conducted truancy hearings in the year before Allen took over the responsibility, said they have put parents in jail when all else failed, but it’s rare.

Saunders said truancy hearings serve more as an intervention and wake-up call to parents because truancy is usually a symptom of a bigger problem, such as illness or a need for clothes, food or counseling.

Allen said courts should intervene only when the school system’s resources are exhausted, but Linda Heggs, the district’s lead social worker, said her office is stretched thin with eight social workers for more than 31,000 students at 56 schools.

Before social workers are called in, teachers are responsible for tracking down absent students, according to the attendance protocol.

Teachers make phone calls and send letters home after the second and third absences, but many pa­rents don’t respond, said Lynn Haynes, a fifth-grade teacher at Garrett Ele­ment­ary School, where last year nearly a third of the students missed the equivalent of four weeks of school.

“It costs time because you have to go back and try to catch them up in a class that’s already full,” Haynes said. “There’s no time to do, but you have to make the time.

“You do what you can to get the students to want to go to school and put pressure on the parents to get them there. Once you do that, you know what happens? They move.”

The high number of transient families in Richmond County contributes to absenteeism, school and Juvenile Court officials said. Some students’ permanent records show that they have attended eight to 10 schools before they hit the fifth grade, Haynes said.

New incentives

Acknowledging the poor attendance rates, Garrett Elementary is trying something new to combat absenteeism. This month it kicked off an incentive program to reward students with perfect attendance with pizza or other treats.

“We are aware of the fact we’re dealing with parents that are not sending their kids to school for whatever reason. (But) we have found when you reward kids for doing the right thing, they are going to put the pressure on their parents,” Haynes said.

Garrett Elementary Prin­cipal Paula Kaminski shares the frustration of dealing with parents with a blasé attitude about school.

“I’ve got people breezing in when they’re ready. If the weather’s bad, they don’t come in on time, or they just don’t show up,” she said.

Heggs said that before referring students to DJJ, her office works to find out what is causing truancy. Social workers visit the home and offer the services of local agencies if a family needs clothes or counseling.

About half of those students make a turnaround, but in the 2010-11 school year 4,178 went on to collect have 10 or more unexcused absences after social worker intervention The state Department of Education lacks the authority to make any local school district do more than what state laws requires: the establishment of a truancy protocol and notices sent to parents after five unexcused absences.

There is no state law that sets a limit on how many days a student can miss before punitive consequences are enforced against student or parent. The state does have a law that says children younger than 16 must attend school. Parents who fail to educate their children can be prosecuted, but if the only court with authority over parents and their children – Juvenile Court – ignores its duty, there are absolutely no consequences.

“There’s obviously a problem if we’ve got 8,000 (students) not going to school and we’ve got the graduation rates we’ve got in Richmond County,” said Superior Court Chief Judge J. Carlisle Overstreet. “The numbers shouldn’t be falling in an empty barrel somewhere. There should be a committee out there to address them. I would hope the juvenile judges would address this.”

The Augusta Judicial Circuit’s three juvenile court judges met with Roberson and other school officials Thursday to discuss solutions to the truancy crisis.

According to a news release, the judges plan to hear “as many truancy cases as necessary to effectively enforce truancy laws.” They also plan to make presentations to students about absenteeism and drugs as well as talk with school social workers and counselors about how to blend school efforts with the court.

NEW GRADUATION RATE FORMULA

In 2012, all states adopted a new formula to calculate graduation rates and used it to report the 2010-11 numbers. The new cohort method divided the total number of students who earned a diploma at the end of 2010-11 by the number of first-time ninth-graders in fall 2007, accounting for students who transferred in and out or died during the four years. The new formula produced graduation rates that were significantly lower than the formula used in the past, which just calculated the total diplomas at the end of a year with the total number of 12th-graders.

CHRONICALLY ABSENT RATES

Students who miss 15 or more days are classified as chronically absent. A look at nine Richmond County schools' 2011 rates:

SCHOOLCHRONICALLY ABSENT
Butler High28%
Josey High27%
Craig-Houghton Elementary19%
Hephzibah High21%
Garrett Elementary18%
Barton Chapel Elementary14%
Laney High17%
Jenkins-White Elementary14%
Blythe Elementary18%


Source: Georgia Department of Education

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single parent
395
Points
single parent 09/22/12 - 10:41 pm
5
0
Care

In the elementary schools I could give a little slack to, but not much. The whole point to school is to learn "re·spon·si·bil·i·ty - particular burden of obligation upon one who is responsible as too
reliability or dependability, especially in meeting debts or payments"
It is not like we just started going to school in the USA or CSRA. At the High School level the student must take the get up and go to make it to school and participate as they should. Our society has become a "WANT IT NOW BUT DO NOT WORK FOR IT SOCIETY!" My parents were always traveling and 90% of the time I handled my own business to get to school, because I did have a little pride/responsibilty in "MYSELF" to handle it. To many analysis and excuses are being made these days. Not only for the reasons why, but for the youth.
"Oh they are only children they are not responsible enough for their actions, we should slap them on the wrist and hug them after a time out" Ok with that being said look at how many absolutely violent crimes and any other crimes are being committed.Look at the so called kids making more money than their parents at 18-25. I seen a comment of POVERTY, really? People living in the sand lands of Iraq and other third world places are in poverty, they DO NOT have social programs.
People want to hurry and blame the teacher, but for reasons stated above and the fact of :Who wants to teach in an environment in which you have to basically come to work with boxing gloves on, a body guard or every comment is met with a rap ? This is a national problem and I guarantee it is a culture envoked problem, just look around you in all walks of life.
By the way I worked TWO jobs, ran a side business and made sure my kids did their thing, even if I was not in the home with them. RESPONSIBILITY !

Little Lamb
43792
Points
Little Lamb 09/22/12 - 11:18 pm
3
1
Whatta Ya Gonna Do?

From the story:

The Richmond County attendance committee formed in 2005, but members have not met twice a year to discuss attendance issues and solutions, as the law requires.

Well, do you want to lock the committee members up, or just go on letting them ignore their duties?

Little Lamb
43792
Points
Little Lamb 09/22/12 - 11:22 pm
2
1
Proficiency

From the story:

In 2010-11, 42 percent of the students at T.W. Josey High School missed more than 15 days of school.

That is why Josey cannot win a football game!

Little Lamb
43792
Points
Little Lamb 09/22/12 - 11:25 pm
4
1
Victimhood

From the story:

Superintendent Frank Roberson said that school system personnel are doing everything required to combat absenteeism but that they cannot substitute for parents.

Sorry, Supt. Roberson, but playing the victim will not help you hang on to your job. You've got to produce.

Little Lamb
43792
Points
Little Lamb 09/22/12 - 11:31 pm
1
1
Who, Me?

From the story:

According to state law, the chief superior court judge of every district was required to form an attendance committee in 2005 composed of representatives of the school board, law enforcement, county board of health, juvenile court judges and about 10 others. The Richmond County committee formed in 2005, but members have not met twice a year to discuss attendance issues and solutions, as the law requires. And some individuals who are required to be part of the committee, such as Sheriff Ronnie Strength, were not even aware it existed.

I can hear Sheriff Ronnie Strength quoting Charles Dickens now, “If the law supposes that, then the law is a arse.”

Bleak House

Little Lamb
43792
Points
Little Lamb 09/22/12 - 11:36 pm
6
1
Are you going to fix the problem or fix the blame?

From the story:

School Board Trustee Frank Dolan believes government is to blame.

Well, let's get the government out of the school business!

Little Lamb
43792
Points
Little Lamb 09/22/12 - 11:41 pm
5
1
Yeah, but

Former Juvenile Court Judge Ben Allen said, “If we put the child in jail, then he’s not going to school.”

Yeah, but at least he will not be dragging down the school statistics on attendance, test scores, and graduation rates. At least that's something.

CobaltGeorge
149526
Points
CobaltGeorge 09/23/12 - 07:25 am
3
2
Staff Writers

There is a lot of "Talk the Talk" in your article - but - basically, Nobody is "Walking the Walk"!

Educatorandparent
4
Points
Educatorandparent 09/23/12 - 07:39 am
2
0
Unenforced rules............

The attendance policies are not the only regulations that are not enforced in Richmond County. Often teachers and principals are reluctant to enforce rules and policies because when a parent goes downtown whining the principals and teachers are not backed! This undermines any authority of the people on the front line. How hard is it to just CONSISTENTLY ENFORCE the rules and regulations you already have on the books? We need to be teaching these kids how the REAL WORLD works!

avidreader
2947
Points
avidreader 09/23/12 - 07:47 am
3
0
Not Surprised!

I will not re-hash my comments from yesterday (Saturday McManus story). None of these statistics surprise me at all. We've got a huge problem, and teachers do not have the time to deal with it. I call parents quite often about many issues, including truancy; however, MOST of the time, the phone number is disconnected or no one answers. If I call an A/B student's parent and leave a message, I get a return call within hours. Strange correlation, huh?

avidreader
2947
Points
avidreader 09/23/12 - 07:45 am
1
0
And by the way . . .

Great news story, McManus and Hodson. The public needs to know.

seenitB4
80729
Points
seenitB4 09/23/12 - 08:21 am
3
2
No Excuse for this

Parents....NO EXCUSE NO EXCUSE.....you can't sugarcoat this Richmond county...

Patty-P
3516
Points
Patty-P 09/23/12 - 08:29 am
1
0
Excellent post single parent.

Excellent post single parent. My sentiments exactly.

HephzibahGuy
8
Points
HephzibahGuy 09/23/12 - 08:31 am
4
0
Attendance

One of the biggest differences between the magnet schools and the regular schools is the discipline. If students at magnet schools don't toe-the-line on attendance, grades, discipline, etc. they are sent back to their zoned schools. If we can have that discipline in the magnet schools we need to have it in all the rest. My son went all the way from kindergarden through high school graduation with perfect attendance and though he did receive a little cheap trophy from his high school, the county board did not even recognize his achievement. I'm sure, based on the statistics noted above that this is not an ordinary occurrence in this county. Coincidently, he also had As and Bs. My point is, if the county is not going to recognize and reward good attendance, how do you think they are going to be able to deal with poor attendance?

tanbaby
1293
Points
tanbaby 09/23/12 - 08:37 am
1
0
why is it always "somebody
Unpublished

why is it always "somebody else's" fault???? most of these kids are just going to live off the system anyway, why do they need an education????

Dr_Evil
101
Points
Dr_Evil 09/23/12 - 09:16 am
1
0
Ged

It's all good...they'll just land in a "state funded" Ged program down the road.

Fools_and_sages
360
Points
Fools_and_sages 09/23/12 - 10:19 am
2
0
Maximum number of absences?
Unpublished

When I was in public school up north, there was a maximum absences policy and I lived in a small city where two-thirds of people lived in poverty. I am sympathetic to the poverty issue and the irresponsible parenting issue, but I also think school board policy could be used to get kids out of these situations. My school district's attendance policy stated that you were allowed to miss no more than 30 days of school with an excused absence or you were automatically held back a grade. I think you could have no more than 15 unexcused absences before your parents were called to school. If the school (i.e. guidance counselor and social worker) determined the child was the problem, then the child was put in the PINS (persons in need of supervision) program, where they had to report to what amounted to a probation officer every day and show them the work they got back or the homework they had to do to prove they went to school. If the child still refused to go to school, it was deemed that the parents could not control the child and the child was put in foster care and forced to go to school. If the parent was deemed the problem, then social services stepped in to attempt to improve the home situation. If the home situation could not be improved, that child was removed from the home and put in the care of relatives or the foster system. With this system, there were 248 people listed in the year book for my graduating class and 245 of us graduated. The other three moved during the school year and most likely graduated from their new school. Poverty and irresponsible parenting play a role in academic achievement. However, the educational system and the social services system also need to do their part. Truancy and poor attendance are symptoms of other, much larger problems in the home. If you really want these kids to have a fighting chance, then make the system work for them because the kids are ones who are suffering. Stop portraying the system as the suffering entity when the system is actually the entity that has the power to help.

dichotomy
30299
Points
dichotomy 09/23/12 - 10:42 am
7
2
I'm sorry, but the public

I'm sorry, but the public education system in Richmond County is broken. Unfixable. The BOE is useless. The Administration is clueless. The teachers are somewhere between clueless, careless, and powerless. The courts are derelict in their DUTIES. In fact, they will even PUNISH parents who are attempting to discipline their kids. The kids are just doing what they do best.....running wild with no supervision and no fear of anything bad happening to them.

I am tired of hearing about it. Nobody is going to do anything except point their finger at someone else. Nobody in the "system" is going to do anything about the problems. Don't expect the parents to do anything. The government and the judges took that responsibility away from them years ago. They can't punish their kids and now the government even feeds their kids. Why would a parent risk being arrested for punishing their kids? I think everyone knows the answer but nobody will say it publicly because it requires that the SYSTEM admit that it has been wrong for decades. The Polictally Correct approach has failed. Lact of discipline, mainstreaming, social promotions, no "failing" so we don't bruise their little ego. The entire public education system is irretrievably lost.

The COUNTY should remove the School TAX from our tax bills and just put that amount under GARBAGE FEES.

Vote YES on the charter school issue. At least we might can save a few who will become taxPAYERS instead of inmates and program recipients.

Jane18
12332
Points
Jane18 09/23/12 - 11:11 am
2
1
Dichotomy's comment

Nothing like telling it like it is!!Too bad no one will learn from it...........And, Fools_and_sages, I liked the way your public school system worked(way back when, just kidding),but you know the powers that be would never go for that now--don't you?

dstewartsr
20388
Points
dstewartsr 09/23/12 - 11:39 am
4
1
Part of the basic premise is wrong.

While I agree we should offer a free education to all, I do not believe it to be a "right." (Nothing paid for by other people should be a right) While it should be there for those who would take advantage of the opportunity, this should not be construed as something mandated by the state. Mandatory attendence is only a tool to make certain the schools get their dollars. It should be if a student interferes with the school's mission, either by disruptive behaviour or absenteeism, they're gone.

I can hear the objections; if they don't go to school, they'll never succeed in society. And tell me the argument for keeping them in school until a certain age and then letting them go, still uneduated? Or what is the use of a diploma to an ignorant, inumerate, illiterate? Booting behinds --or at least the fear of it-- would light a fire under parental substitutes whose only interest in their genetic material's school is as free babysitting.

I've spent my years in the trenches; I would infinitely prefer a class of sixty who --even if they don't want to actually be there act as if they do-- than twenty, half who make it impossible for the other half to learn.

dstewartsr
20388
Points
dstewartsr 09/23/12 - 11:44 am
1
1
“If the law supposes that

... then the law is a arse.”

Sorry, LL, that's Mr. Bumble- Oliver Twist

Augusta resident
1368
Points
Augusta resident 09/23/12 - 11:53 am
1
1
Not just the students

Teachers are just as bad. My son always came home complaining about the sub not being able to handle the class. Teachers would wait until school started to get their knee or shoulder surgeries done. Not to mention that on my way home every morning, I get run over by teachers with their apple license plates, because they are late for school.

madgerman
236
Points
madgerman 09/23/12 - 12:17 pm
0
0
And what about the school
Unpublished

And what about the school rules that say if a student is in "in school detention" theyare not allowed to participate in instructional activities. Rather, they are subjected to days of sitting at a desk in a empty room, staring at a wall and reading a book. I really wonder what that is supposed to accomplish? Yes they are counted as being in school, but they are receiving absolutely no instructions. Policies like this just show how out of touch the system is with quality education and they have no intention of looking into it. No the school board is more interested in procuring more and more instructional aids to assist teachers who probably couldn,t pass a decent test on the subjects they are tesponsible for instructing. Where are the in room cameras so the principles can observe and evaluate teacher competence? Oh, I forgot, theat is an invasion of a teachers privacy.

OpenCurtain
10049
Points
OpenCurtain 09/23/12 - 12:43 pm
5
1
These kids have figured out the system before 7th grade

Get just enough schooling to count money, write their names on checks and do simple text or email msgs.

The Male dropouts work the streets and odd jobs and become baby donors. Females who have the babies and collect ADF, EBI, housing benefits and more. Boy friends visit, get fed, have a roof and a warm bed for few nights a week. Even free; cellphone, gas, utilities, cars or increased benefits for voting for the right person.

So If they have everything handed to them, WHY would they attend school for a better life?

A few more generations of this legalized dumbing-down and we'll have a group breed to be government drones. If not already.

OpenCurtain
10049
Points
OpenCurtain 09/23/12 - 01:00 pm
3
1
Parting shot

I have set up computer systems that send out an automated messages.
Now that we have Obama phones just about everyone has a phone now.

Call or Voice mail the person on record that is required to see the kid gets to school. Leave a message with a legal warning of the law. After 3 no shows without an acceptable excuse, issue a warrant and haul the kid and the person of record into a School Court. Fine the person court costs, $100 for each day, and have the kid spend <90 days in YDC.

If the kid is a JD thug, send him to YDC for schooling.

JRC2024
7920
Points
JRC2024 09/23/12 - 01:31 pm
3
1
Amen, open curtain. But we

Amen, open curtain. But we will always need people to do the manuel labor for us. But that would be beneath them unless the free stuff is cut out and I am for cutting out all of it. No work=none of the good things in life.

JRC2024
7920
Points
JRC2024 09/23/12 - 01:34 pm
3
0
Maybe we should go back to

Maybe we should go back to neighboorhood schools and not try to make everybody equal which will never happen.

Little Lamb
43792
Points
Little Lamb 09/23/12 - 02:00 pm
1
0
Wrong Book

Thanks for correcting my citation, RStewart. I actually never read the book, but I love the quote.

dstewartsr
20388
Points
dstewartsr 09/23/12 - 03:05 pm
2
0
I remember

...because in the lead-up to the quotation, a judge instructs Mr. Bumble that the law supposes a husband to be in control of his wife, thus the response. In another famous quote on that same assumption a character retorts, "Then the law must be a bachelor!"

allhans
23129
Points
allhans 09/23/12 - 03:09 pm
2
0
Maybe look at schools in the

Maybe look at schools in the areas without as much of a problem and take their advice... find out how they do it.

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