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Free tutoring being phased out due to low participation

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As Georgia moves away from many policies under the No Child Left Behind legislation, the transition is proving to be a give and take of services offered to students.

One change beginning next year is the end of Supplemental Education Services, or free tutoring for students at impoverished and underperforming schools.

In its waiver from NCLB, the state asked to use the money from SES for other purposes because of low participation in the program.

In 2011-12, 42 percent of eligible students in Richmond County took advantage of the tutoring, up from 25 percent the year before.

Last year, 16 schools qualified for the free tutoring because they did not meet Adequate Yearly Progress for two years or had a high number of low-income students.

The district contracted with dozens of companies that provided tutoring services, and parents of qualified children could select which programs they’d like to use. Some providers held sessions at the student’s school while others tutored off campus, so in some cases parents had to provide transportation.

While it was underused, SES gave an option for free tutoring to about 9,000 students, and the system replacing SES might not provide the same services to as many students.

“They won’t have the same money they had last year,” said Audrey Spry, the district’s interim Title I director.

SES is being replaced by the Flexible Learning Program, which requires only the underperforming Priority and Focus schools – labels under the new College and Career Readiness Performance Index – to plan for extended learning time, whether it is after-school tutoring, Saturday school or something else.

While 16 schools qualified for SES, there are nine Priority and Focus schools.

The schools that received money for free tutoring last year will no longer receive the same funding. Principals at those Title I, or impoverished, schools have to factor tutoring into their budgets as they see fit.

That may or may not include the same tutoring opportunities SES offered before.

Spry said those schools will have to see how principals will use Title I money and if tutoring factors in. The good news, she said, is that the community and parents have a say in how principals budget Title I money.

Barbara Williams, a grandmother of two pupils at Diamond Lakes Elementary School, said she hopes a new program will replace the tutoring her granddaughters received last year.

“A lot of parents think tutoring is just for struggling students, but if your child is an A student, you want them to stay an A student,” Williams said. “I want to see this tutoring continue.”

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Craig Spinks
817
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Craig Spinks 07/13/12 - 02:32 am
1
0
Volunteer tutors

What's being done to recruit educated volunteers to tutor students, particularly struggling ones? How many retired teachers and other retirees are there in our area?

Dr. Craig Spinks/ Georgians for Educational Excellence

corgimom
33994
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corgimom 07/13/12 - 06:24 am
0
1
I'm wondering how RCBOE is

I'm wondering how RCBOE is going to meet its stated goals of a 90% graduation rate without tutoring. Look at the 8th grade CRCT scores, especially in math, science, and social studies. A 90% graduation rate is unobtainable with scores like those.

lifelongresident
1323
Points
lifelongresident 07/13/12 - 07:53 am
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corgi, that's not would be
Unpublished

corgi,

that's not would be disputed if you ask ms. venus cain, chances are she will make the claim that test scores don't really matter, its the kids (and their self-esteem) that count. meanwhile by the time they get to the 12th grade they wouldn't be able to read the diploma they are given, being the test scores ar abysmail especially in the important subjects you mentioned i agree with you a graduation rate will be unattainable, hence the reason they are eliminating end of the year graduation tests.

scoobynews
3896
Points
scoobynews 07/13/12 - 08:35 am
0
1
You can lead a horse to water but you can't make it drink!

I have seen these programs first hand and unless there is reinforcement at home it is just babysitting for an extra hour or two after school. I saw our after-school program go from large numbers in the first year to barely a handful this past year. Children that were referred to the program parents never followed up to make them stay for the needed help. There were others who wanted you to tutor on their time as if you didn't have a family of your own to go home to. The key to education is parental support not more tutoring programs and throwing money at a problem that can only be fixed from within.

avidreader
3377
Points
avidreader 07/13/12 - 09:54 am
0
0
You can lead a horse to water, but a pencil must be led!

High schoolers begin school every day at 7:35 and have a thirty-minute break for lunch. When the 2:30 bell rings, these kids are burned out -- seven straight classes will consume anyone's energy (including the teachers). Attending a tutoring session after school is not very appealing, not to mention transportation issues (which are BIG issues to impoverished families, valid or not).

Also, as scooby says, parental support is the issue in properly educating children. Many parents of high schoolers do not even know if their kids are showing up for school. As data driven as our school system is, it seems that statistics concerning absenteeism should not be that difficult to gather and correlate with performance. If the butts aren't in the seats, the teachers can't control the academic outcome.

As only pure luck can provide, I had very few issues with high absenteeism last year, and guess what; my end-of-the-year academic results were my best ever. Who would have thunk it?

I guess big-dollar tutoring is an OK thing, but it's not the answer to successful education. Daily involvement from caring parents is the ticket.

avidreader
3377
Points
avidreader 07/13/12 - 09:52 am
0
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. . . but a pencil must be graphite!

Yes, I know, pencils are not comprised of lead anymore! But I love the pun!

lynn7044
190
Points
lynn7044 07/13/12 - 09:56 am
1
0
Tutoring Works

Well scoobynews, I seen first hand where it does work. I am a parent from Cross Creek High School. I saw at the start of the school year when students wasn't staying at after-school or Sat. school to over 100 student was there. Sometime aour children don't always come from the best home-life, yet it does't mean the student still don't want better. I know a teacher who be-little some students in summer school because they try to make sure they have a true understanding and she call me slow out in class. Yet, these are the same kids who pass EOCT (A-B students)and are not problems.
Yes, there must be a better plan for educating our young people but it's a "TEAM" thats going to do it. I feel that every school in Richmond County needs a PTA because those kids who are not in sports or other after school active can also feel that there in put matter. I feel we should have a bus that would take students home after school. We should not be footing the bill for kids who go to the magent school. Our other kids are being short change already because of these school. When kids at the other school don't have books because the magent get them first. I disagree with it. Don't by no mean say thouse kids are smarter. If your child don't keep the grades up they send them back to the home school. They choose not to deal with the problem.
I don't understand as many colleges that are here that there is not a program to bring in our future teacher to work in the school . This way they get a first had feel of working in the schools. The college students get credits and the kids get free help. It seem its a win for us all. RCBOE always say they don't have any money so use what you got.
Having seen first hand how some of our so call educators treat our kids, I do understand why some kids act the way they do. No, its not a race thing either what so many people here try to make it. So what the zip code is not right. these are still all our future and we got to work to make a change for them all.

lynn7044
190
Points
lynn7044 07/13/12 - 10:03 am
0
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Avidreader

I am glad you had a great school year! You set the tone a the begain of the year. If you make learing fun you will get the kids there even if it mean they won't miss your class. You make the students feel you care and that will always make the different. KEEP UP THE GREAT JOB!!!

Craig Spinks
817
Points
Craig Spinks 07/14/12 - 02:06 pm
0
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(L)ynn7044,

You are a treasure for our area and our kids.

Since "there's not much courage in Augusta, GA," every public demonstration of personal courage is greatly appreciated.

class1
299
Points
class1 07/14/12 - 07:03 pm
0
0
Tutoring

I would like to see some research on the students that used the tutoring actually passed the CRCT?

avidreader
3377
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avidreader 07/15/12 - 10:25 am
0
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To Lynn

I wish all parents had your enthusiasm. And by the way, Richmond County schools have tons of ASU apprentices in the schools, and believe me, this is a wonderful thing.

Make sure your child goes to college; you will be so proud and relieved.

lynn7044
190
Points
lynn7044 07/19/12 - 03:44 pm
0
0
To Avidreader

That is the plan we have in place. I make sure that his grades are in order and he take classes that are in place with the 3 colleges of his choice. I make my present, at least 3 time a week. My son knows I don't play about school and I will break his neck at school if he cut up at school. I have a expectation for my son and I won't let him get away cause his friends parents let there kids. I have always told him 2 weeks from graduation he better have plan A, or I will have plan B.

Parent from the old school!!!!!!

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