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Augusta State anticipated more state budget cuts

State exempts K-12 schools from further spending reductions

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Augusta State University officials said Friday that they don't foresee more furloughs as a result of a new 4 percent spending cut to state agencies ordered by Gov. Sonny Perdue.

Instead, the university will cut back on equipment purchases and campus maintanence projects, according to ASU spokeswoman Kathy Schofe.

In May, ASU officials said they would offset much of a previously announced $773,000 state funding cut for this fiscal year with increased tuition for new students and some current ones. The university also said it would rely more on part-time faculty.

Perdue ordered already slimmed-down Georgia agencies to take another 4 percent spending cut starting in August because the state's new budget relies on federal stimulus money that might never come.

Perdue exempted K-12 schools from the latest cut, but not the university system.

Medical College of Georgia officials did not respond Friday to requests for information about the cut's effect.

The cut will hit agencies that hand out driver's licenses, educate college students and run parks, prisons and health care programs that cover more than a million Georgians. Those agencies employ about 90,000 people.

The move, which will save the state $25.5 million per month, is a pre-emptive one, the governor's office said. Congress could still come through with the stimulus money before the end of the year, but it's uncertain.

Perdue and lawmakers approved a budget for this fiscal year, which began July 1, that counted on about $375 million in extra federal Medicaid stimulus money. About 30 states wrote the extra money into their budget plans.

Conservative Democrats and Republicans in Congress stalled the funding, arguing that it added to the burgeoning federal deficit. Lawmakers, including U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., say they can only support it if there are spending cuts.

The latest cuts could mean furloughs for more state employees. Some agencies are already making workers take days off without pay, but many more may have to do so with the new cuts.

Several agency officials said Thursday they are working on proposals to deal with the new cutbacks, but they don't have firm plans yet.

Preston Sparks covers education for The Augusta Chronicle; James Salzer covers government for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

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Chillen
17
Points
Chillen 07/23/10 - 09:30 am
0
0
It has to be done.

It has to be done.

madneighbor
0
Points
madneighbor 07/23/10 - 09:49 am
0
0
Just what State employees

Just what State employees need, more furlough days. They are already taking one a month. Why doesn't the Gov. take a cut in pay and curb wasteful spending in the State institutions?

baronvonreich
1
Points
baronvonreich 07/23/10 - 09:54 am
0
0
State governments could and

State governments could and should be cut in half. The other people's money is running out. It is time to bring back personal responsibility.

Big_vike
1
Points
Big_vike 07/23/10 - 10:23 am
0
0
Instead of furloughs we could

Instead of furloughs we could just reduce staff by one member in every state office, then they wouldn't need to take furloughs, how about that?

LaTwon
1
Points
LaTwon 07/23/10 - 10:24 am
0
0
this will give u a laugh:

this will give u a laugh: California city manager's pension could top $30 million | Reuters

REDRIDER
134
Points
REDRIDER 07/23/10 - 11:30 am
0
0
Early Retirement PLEASE!

Early Retirement PLEASE!

Taylor B
5
Points
Taylor B 07/23/10 - 02:45 pm
0
0
I took a 20 percent hit in

I took a 20 percent hit in pay last year, that's like a furlough day a week, plus I still have to show up! Commission has its ups and downs.

disssman
6
Points
disssman 07/23/10 - 06:51 pm
0
0
Hey Governer. How about we

Hey Governer. How about we quit building prisons on expensive land and move out to the suburbs. Next lets errect some prefab metal buildings surrounded by a string of barbed wire, then an electric fence and another barbed wire fence and so forth. Lastly lets build some machine gun towers at all corners for those that want to get thru the fences. I dare say we could probably hire 3 times as many guards as now and still save a ton of money. I would have a recreation area with tv, books etc, but it would only be for people with decent haircut no beards and no tattoos. P.S. provide free tattoo removal as requested by prisoners.

55 F-100
1
Points
55 F-100 07/23/10 - 07:37 pm
0
0
Why not offer a 75%

Why not offer a 75% retirement pension to all employees with 25 years of service? That would do more to thin the "state employee herd" than anything else, and those vacated positions could then be evaluated to determine if those positions were truly essential and therefore funded or not in the future. Here's your sign!

datarelease
2
Points
datarelease 07/24/10 - 03:49 am
0
0
I wonder how inanely bigoted

I wonder how inanely bigoted lawsuits factor into this budget crunch.

soldout
1283
Points
soldout 07/24/10 - 07:09 am
0
0
Maybe if they taught more and

Maybe if they taught more and tried to brainwash less with liberal views there would more of a blessing on their financial situation. It would be worth a try.

airbud7
1
Points
airbud7 07/24/10 - 09:34 am
0
0
They need the money to pay

They need the money to pay for Jennifer Keeton's Lawsuit.

Sweet son
11651
Points
Sweet son 07/24/10 - 01:12 pm
0
0
55 F-100, Early retirement

55 F-100, Early retirement and pensions probably bankrupt the retirement systems. If you pay into a retirement fund you might want to check on its financial strength. You might end up like the folks who worked for Benjamin Eicholtz. Seems like he is doing jail time all the while advertising onTV for his firm.

corgimom
38485
Points
corgimom 07/24/10 - 08:48 pm
0
0
Deferred maintenance just

Deferred maintenance just pushs the costs further down the road, and then it's usually more expensive. You have to fix it or clean it sometime.

corgimom
38485
Points
corgimom 07/24/10 - 08:51 pm
0
0
"Maybe if they taught more

"Maybe if they taught more and tried to brainwash less with liberal views there would more of a blessing on their financial situation. It would be worth a try.

What? What blessing? All they do is raise tuition to cover the costs. And then there's this-

"The cut will hit agencies that hand out driver's licenses, educate college students and run parks, prisons and health care programs that cover more than a million Georgians. Those agencies employ about 90,000 people."

I guess they need to be less liberal in giving people drivers licenses and maintaining parks, and providing medical care, too. Then they would have more of a blessing then, too.

You can't make this stuff up, you know?

freespeach
4
Points
freespeach 07/24/10 - 11:47 pm
0
0
Offer a 75% retirement
Unpublished

Offer a 75% retirement pension plan to all employees with 25 years of service? That's the kind of thinking that put the state in the financial crisis it is in. So, taxpayers should pay you 75% of your salary for the rest of your life so you can retire early? Let's say a person started working for the state when they were 18. Your plan would allow them to retire at age 43 and get 75% of their salary for the rest of their life. Unbelievable!

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