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Richmond Co. | Columbia Co. | Aiken Co. |

Deputy shoots dog; owner cited

Saturday, June 14, 2014 4:19 PM
Last updated Sunday, June 15, 2014 1:14 AM
  • Follow Crime & courts

A dog was shot and its owner was cited after police say it charged a Richmond County sheriff’s deputy Saturday.

About 8:30 a.m., Deputy Kevin Link was called to the 3600 block of Monmouth Road because of two vicious dogs in the area, according to a police statement.

When he arrived, one of the dogs charged at Link, and he fired a shot at the dog. The wounded dog was taken to a veterinarian by its owner, Kelsey Beatty, who was cited by animal control.

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happychimer
20419
Points
happychimer 06/14/14 - 05:17 pm
4
22
Yeah cops love killing dogs.

Yeah cops love killing dogs. Yes they do.

The Mick
844
Points
The Mick 06/14/14 - 08:49 pm
2
0
Had a pooch just like that

Had a pooch just like that when I was a kid

allhans
25514
Points
allhans 06/14/14 - 09:07 pm
4
0
Was the dog killed or only

Was the dog killed or only wounded?

Gage Creed
19958
Points
Gage Creed 06/14/14 - 09:08 pm
15
3
Yeah dogs that charge cops

Yeah dogs that charge cops tend to get killed.. Yes they do.

nocnoc
54311
Points
nocnoc 06/14/14 - 09:13 pm
4
0
I have to ask.

What No Thomas A. Swift's Electric Rifle
☺☺☺☺look it up☺☺☺☺☺

happychimer
20419
Points
happychimer 06/14/14 - 09:18 pm
6
2
The dog lived. YEAH!

The dog lived. YEAH!

csraguy
2460
Points
csraguy 06/15/14 - 09:35 pm
16
0
Reality

The cops respond to vicious dog calls even when animal control doesn't for safety reasons. The officer did not ask for the call nor did he instruct the dog to charge him and yet some dog lovers (of which I am one as well) don't understand why the officer does his or her job.

The real question should be why these owners don't do their jobs and properly secure their animals. Anyone not happy with these results should take out their anger on negligent dog owners not the police who were called there by scared neighbors.

When it is bad enough that the 911 center is called about a vicious animal in the area, don't expect the police to respond and then just sit there. It is there job to end the threat to the public and to protect themselves as well. If the officer fails to take prompt action and someone is bitten, injured, or even worse, killed, then everyone would be asking why the police didn't do their job and end the threat.

Young Fred
22384
Points
Young Fred 06/15/14 - 01:53 am
5
3
I'd like to know

what constitutes a "vicious dog" call. Not saying this was the case in this instance, but I've seen were people taunt a dog, he barks viciously, and a call is made.

Let's say for instance, neer-do-wells were taunting the dog, called the police, the police go strolling into the yard and get charged by the dog. Would this constitute a justified shooting? Just asking, because it's happened before! (not saying that was the case this time).

Just asking. Because some dogs are very protective of property and family. A dog in his/her own yard is not a "threat to public". I don't blame an officer for shooting anyone or thing that "charges" them, I'm just curious.

The Mick
844
Points
The Mick 06/15/14 - 05:55 am
8
0
Young Fred I guess the best

Young Fred I guess the best answer if the dog is charging, wether in it's yard or not, it was not fenced and not on a leash. There is a leash law. I love dogs to, but it sounds like responsibility lies with the owner to me.

corgimom
41599
Points
corgimom 06/15/14 - 07:39 am
12
1
I don't blame the police

I don't blame the police officer and I don't blame the dog.

I blame THE OWNER.

Period. End of story.

corgimom
41599
Points
corgimom 06/15/14 - 09:25 am
7
1
What cops really love is to

What cops really love is to go home at the end of their shift intact and in one piece.

itsanotherday1
50232
Points
itsanotherday1 06/15/14 - 10:04 am
5
3
We've discussed this before.

We've discussed this before. First, I do not blame the officer for protecting himself; especially since he was on "high alert" for a vicious dog.
That said, I think police should get more training on how to manage threats from dogs since they do have the potential for increased exposure. There are effective deterrents less lethal than a bullet.

curly123053
5810
Points
curly123053 06/15/14 - 01:19 pm
6
0
Oh well

My eyes got opened on dogs running loose when I transferred from EMS to Animal Control. I too am a dog lover and owner of a dog. I worked as the animal control dispatcher and took calls related to animal issues and dispatched the officers. Many of the calls were related to dogs running loose and chasing and scaring people. I learned that when dogs run in groups of two or more they have a tendency to act vicious. It does not matter with the breed of the dog. When an owner allows a dog to run free that owner is in violation of state law. When that dog is running with other dogs it gets "protective" of the pack it is running with and the dogs will seem vicious to people by growling and showing its teeth regardless of the breed. When the same dogs are successfully captured and brought to the shelter they are as tame as any nice dog because it's no longer protecting its"pack". ...That being said it is no fault of the officers when charged by a dog running with another dog or a group of dogs and they feel threatened enough to shoot a dog. The officer has no way of knowing if the dog or dogs is going to bite him or her. That officer is not going to wait and see if that dog is going to bite him. If a dog is charging you and growling you must assume it will bite. The owners are then responsible for their dog being out running around. I hate that the dog got shot but I blame the owner.

KSL
151920
Points
KSL 06/15/14 - 01:20 pm
9
1
Maybe the owner of the dog

Maybe the owner of the dog should have been shot and the dog cited.

KSL
151920
Points
KSL 06/15/14 - 01:27 pm
10
1
Pack mentality. The same

Pack mentality. The same thing happens to people. Rioters and looters are probably made up of many people who would not be breaking in, stealing or setting fires.

curly123053
5810
Points
curly123053 06/15/14 - 01:36 pm
6
0
KSL you're correct about

KSL you're correct about that.

Willow Bailey
20606
Points
Willow Bailey 06/16/14 - 05:17 am
6
0
That's what I was thinking

That's what I was thinking KSL. Shoot the owner...cite the dog!

jimmymac
52190
Points
jimmymac 06/16/14 - 07:48 am
1
0
DOG
Unpublished

It's a dog and no police officers should be injured doing his job. I'm sorry he had to shoot the dog but the dog should have been on a leash and it wouldn't have been shot. Glad no humans were injured. P.S. I have a dog that I love to death but he's always on a leash when out of our fenced backyard.

itsanotherday1
50232
Points
itsanotherday1 06/16/14 - 10:02 am
2
1
Curly, you are right on about

Curly, you are right on about the "pack mentality", and KSL too as it applies to hoodlums.

If there is more than one dog, then I too would shoot first if charged.

My concern is when there is one dog, and the officer shoots first without understanding the true posture of the animal. A trained/experienced person can read them and ascertain the difference between fearful behavior and aggressive posture. A dog wagging his tail may very well be preparing to attack; while one baring his teeth may just be afraid or uncertain.

It isn't that hard to learn how to read their body language; and most certainly, an officer with a baton and pepper spray should be able to defend themselves against one aggressive dog. Often, it is the human's posture and behavior that puts the dog on the defensive and provokes an attack. A little education would go a long way.

It might save a few pets just doing their job at home, and save some flying lead that could harm bystanders when dealing with a dog at large.

Let me say again, I have no issue at all with a vicious dog being dispatched; it would suit me to euthanize them all. I won't have a biting dog, and I don't think anyone else should have one either unless it is well trained and only attacks when commanded or actively protecting its "family".
We had a Cocker once that bit my two year old in the face. He would have been dead on the spot had it not been for my children. He was gone that night, awaiting the needle, when someone said they would take him. He eventually wound up with Mike, a ColCo deputy ( who has since passed away).

corgimom
41599
Points
corgimom 06/16/14 - 11:18 am
2
1
I've had dogs all my life. I

I've had dogs all my life. I have 3 right now. When I see a dog that is aggressively coming at me, tense, staring, ears back, and growling, I assume that dog is going to bite. I don't stand around and see what it's going to do next, or wonder if I should get back, or look around to see if there are other dogs around.

But dogs instinctively don't like police officers. They wear a uniform. They wear a hat. They have very strange objects hanging off of them. They look very, very different to a dog, and they assume that they are there for bad purposes, because they look and sound so different. A dog that can love everybody else can charge a police officer, just because they look so strange to them.

Most dogs don't like people in uniforms, period. They look different than the other people that come to the house.

They don't like people in uniforms, the UPS man, or the garbage man (Mommy! Mommy! Some people came up in a big scary truck, and they are STEALING OUR GARBAGE! STEALING IT! COME QUICK!)

rational thought trumps emotion
2714
Points
rational thought trumps emotion 06/16/14 - 02:41 pm
3
0
Glad to see

Glad to see most understand what the officer is faced with and what he must do upon arrival.

This is 100% the owners fault and they should be charged.

Navy Gary
1615
Points
Navy Gary 06/16/14 - 09:23 pm
2
1
The dog

The dog smelled fear and attacked....lol. Truth be told, doggie boy comes at me and I have a gun, it's bye bye doggie boy. Seems like common sense to me...

Lv2010
2
Points
Lv2010 06/19/14 - 02:35 am
0
0
The problem with society

... As simple as this, you all want to post about how the right thing was done but in actuality maybe the dog wasn't "vicious" maybe the dog was extremely playful, maybe the dog enjoyed not being in a yard. Maybe the real problem here is the coward that shot the animal and the rest of you who think it's ok. There are plenty of harmful nuisances in this world, and I'm going to doubt it was this puppy. And go ahead and prove it was vicious, because no where does it say that this coward was attacked... And coming from someone who has actually been attacked by an animal and has spent a great deal of time, money, and emotional effort putting the pieces of their life back together...this person that shot the animal was probably better off shooting themselves.

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