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Paine College shooting suspect, victim arrested before

Wednesday, May 7, 2014 10:31 AM
Last updated Thursday, May 8, 2014 1:07 AM
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Both the suspect and victim in Monday’s shooting at Paine College have arrest records.

Xavier Deanthony Cooper, 20, a Paine student from DeKalb County, has been behind bars at least five times since 2011.

Cooper was booked into Richmond County jail Monday afternoon on charges of aggravated assault and possession of a firearm on school grounds and possession of a firearm during commission of a crime.

Although it’s his first arrest in this county, Cooper has four other arrests in metro Atlanta.

The most recent arrest was on Dec. 24, when he was charged with possession and use of drug-related objects in Fulton County.

At the age of 17, in 2011, he was arrested twice and was charged with affray, simple battery, disorderly conduct and contributing to the delinquency of a minor.

In June 2012 at age 18, Cooper was charged with his first felony for criminal damage to property in the second degree.

At a press conference Tuesday afternoon, Brandon Brown, vice president for academic advancement at Paine, said the administration was not aware of Cooper’s charges. He stated that Cooper had checked “no” in his admission papers when asked if he had ever been charged with a felony. Because of that answer, Brown said, the student did not warrant a background check.

The victim, 21-year-old JaJuan Lawayne Baker, of Wilmington, N.C., also has gun-related charges from another state from 2012, Richmond County Sheriff Richard Roundtree said Wednesday.

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jimmymac
47688
Points
jimmymac 05/07/14 - 09:56 am
2
0
TRUTH
Unpublished

I can't believe they would ask a question about felony arrests and trust that a felon would be honest enough to not lie.

FormerAugustaResident
116
Points
FormerAugustaResident 05/07/14 - 10:08 am
17
2
What's the point???

How can someone can be incarcerated 5 times in 3 years? By the age of 21 this young man is at least smart enough to know that jail is nothing more to him than an overnight stay with free meals. Why should he be deterred from a life of crime? How silly our judicial system has gotten....

And..thanks to Mr. Brown for informing us that only "honest" felons get a background check. Those who are sneaky enough to lie about their past have circumvented a background check.

Pops
14389
Points
Pops 05/07/14 - 10:14 am
14
2
So by chance if Charles Manson were to

get paroled and moves to Augusta, he can check "no" to the felony question and get admitted to Paine College.......makes perfect sense to me......just as long as ole Charles can get some government money to take classes there........come on in.........

oldfella
620
Points
oldfella 05/07/14 - 10:28 am
10
3
Background check is too expensive maybe?

Back the train up - a violent felon lied? That's one for the record books.
Funny most employers make you get a basic criminal records check at your own cost during the hiring process - which is around five or ten dollars depending on which police station you go to. My point is the college (or government reimbursing the college or even the students themselves) can't afford ten dollars per student to run a five minute check? Wait - a large percentage of their enrollment would drop if everyone was checked, which would apply to most colleges not just this one.

nocnoc
49156
Points
nocnoc 05/07/14 - 10:33 am
15
3
Wouldn't be nice come election time

If we could researched the conviction rates & Sentencing Rates of DA's, and The Judges Sentencing data vs. Repeat offenders?

Think of how we might vote knowing the track records of those running for re-election.

Bizkit
35567
Points
Bizkit 05/07/14 - 11:41 am
14
2
I would wager a lot of their

I would wager a lot of their students have arrest records.

Sweet son
11648
Points
Sweet son 05/07/14 - 12:48 pm
7
0
LOL!

His Dad in an interview with an Atlanta TV station said he had been in fear since January. Don't know why, he had the means to protect himself. Nothing but a bully.

BamaMan
2687
Points
BamaMan 05/07/14 - 01:10 pm
10
0
$$$

Maybe the money is more important than putting other students at risk of turning away a repeat offender. That's my bet.

corgimom
38451
Points
corgimom 05/07/14 - 05:05 pm
13
1
Sure seems funny how trouble

Sure seems funny how trouble follows him wherever he goes, you know?

I have a feeling his parents sent him to Paine to get him out of Atlanta, but he took his behavior with him.

oldredneckman96
5115
Points
oldredneckman96 05/07/14 - 08:33 pm
0
0
What?
Unpublished

We have to quit playing catch and release and start tagging and bagging. Sure people cry it "cost too much to keep criminals in jail" but what about when one of these thugs misses his target and kills your loved one? Catch em, keep em. It is cheaper. P. S. to Paine, you can google anyone for free when you make them provide you with the basic info needed to apply to any school. As others have said, maybe you do not want to know?

crkgrdn
2287
Points
crkgrdn 05/07/14 - 09:18 pm
3
0
Who OWNS the weapon?

Where is any investigation by the the journalist? Who owns the weapon? How did the perp get the weapon? Does perp have a permit? Nothing about the legal or illegal possession of a firearm.

bubbasauce
24260
Points
bubbasauce 05/07/14 - 09:21 pm
6
0
Check a box and you get a

Check a box and you get a pass on background check? Unfricking believable. What a joke Paine college is. And good ole Augusta wants to give them money from Splost? Ain't America a great Country? Not!

deestafford
31934
Points
deestafford 05/07/14 - 09:34 pm
4
0
But, he is such a good boy. He just...

But, he is such a good boy. He just fell in with the wrong crowd. Wait a minute... HE is the wrong crowd.

Navy Gary
1615
Points
Navy Gary 05/07/14 - 11:52 pm
6
0
Rap Music

It's that darned rap music. It does me the same way, everytime someone drives by my house with it thumping, I want to shoot someone too!!

Airman
3823
Points
Airman 05/08/14 - 04:48 am
5
0
Background Check

I know in Kentucy they require the students to supply copies of their driving records and criminal background, thus no expense to the school

Bizkit
35567
Points
Bizkit 05/08/14 - 07:40 am
3
0
The DOJ believes all felons

The DOJ believes all felons or ex-cons should have all their rights restored, so discrimination against felons to go to college will be frowned on by the Obama administration. I see how can a criminal break the cycle without an education. We need more educated criminals-they can become white collar criminals. LOL.

Bizkit
35567
Points
Bizkit 05/08/14 - 07:43 am
3
0
Three or four shootings and

Three or four shootings and just an initial mention on CNN. Usually the media are all over school shootings-this seems blatantly discriminatory. I'll call the ACLU and DOJ to complain the major news outlets are discriminatory and not giving this news more mention-you know the "fairness doctrine" Dems love so much.

Bizkit
35567
Points
Bizkit 05/08/14 - 08:03 am
1
0
Holer's speech: Last August,

Holer's speech: Last August, I announced a new “Smart on Crime” initiative – based on the results of this review – that’s already allowing the Justice Department to strengthen the federal system; to increase our emphasis on proven diversion, rehabilitation, and reentry programs; and to reduce unnecessary collateral consequences for those seeking to rejoin their communities. Among the key changes we’re implementing is a modification of the Department’s charging policies – to ensure that people who commit certain low-level, nonviolent federal drug crimes will face sentences appropriate to their individual conduct – rather than stringent mandatory minimums, which will now be reserved for the most serious criminals.

As you’ll be discussing later today, this change will not only make our system fairer – it will also make our expenditures more productive. It will enhance our ability to combat crime, reduce drug-fueled violence, and protect our communities. And it will complement proposals like the bipartisan Smarter Sentencing Act – cosponsored by Senators Dick Durbin, Mike Lee, and Chairman Patrick Leahy, along with Representatives Bobby Scott and Raul Labrador – to give judges more discretion in determining appropriate sentences for those convicted of certain crimes.

As we work with Members of Congress to refine and pass this legislation, my colleagues and I are simultaneously moving forward with a range of other reforms. We’re investing in evidence-based diversion programs – like drug treatment initiatives and veterans courts – that can serve as alternatives to incarceration in appropriate cases. We’re working to target law enforcement resources to the areas where they’re needed most. And we’re partnering with state officials, agency leaders, and others – including members of the Federal Interagency Reentry Council, comprised of Cabinet Secretaries and leadership from throughout the Obama Administration – to advance proven strategies to help formerly incarcerated people successfully rejoin their communities.

After all, at some point, 95 percent of all prisoners will be released. And just as we expect everyone who commits a crime to pay their societal debts, we also expect them to remain sober and crime-free upon their release. We expect them to get jobs and find housing. And we expect them to become productive, law-abiding members of society.

Unfortunately, as you know all too well, these expectations are not always met. Rates of recidivism remain unacceptably high. And that’s why the Smart on Crime initiative is driving us to tear down unnecessary barriers to economic opportunities and independence. I’ve directed every United States Attorney to designate a Prevention and Reentry Coordinator in his or her district to ensure that this work will be a top priority throughout the country. And I’ve ordered our law enforcement components, and asked state Attorneys General, to reconsider policies that impose overly burdensome collateral consequences on formerly incarcerated individuals without meaningfully improving public safety.

This is important because we’ve seen that maintaining family connections, developing job skills, and fostering community engagement can reduce the likelihood of re-arrest. And we know that restoring basic rights – and encouraging inclusion in all aspects of society – increases the likelihood of successful reintegration. We’ve taken significant steps forward in improving reentry policies and addressing the unintended collateral consequences of certain convictions.

Yet formerly incarcerated people continue to face significant obstacles. They are frequently deprived of opportunities they need to rebuild their lives. And in far too many places, their rights – including the single most basic right of American citizenship – the right to vote – are either abridged or denied." So as long as soon as Cooper gets out of jail Paine college should allow him back into classes to be in compliance with the goals of the DOJ. And Paine is a Dem supporting school and will want to follow the Obama administration.

Bizkit
35567
Points
Bizkit 05/08/14 - 08:13 am
1
0
Funny the DOJ wants to usurp

Funny the DOJ wants to usurp the status mandatory laws and allow discretion,yet when it comes to health insurance-it is mandatory and there is no discretion. That's progressive logic-there is none. I guess convicted felons can't be discriminated against in applying for any job too. Hey they would make great policeman-they are already familiar with the system and understand crime.

Marinerman1
5461
Points
Marinerman1 05/08/14 - 09:22 am
0
0
Which Box...?

Okay, which "box" did Baker choose?? Isn't is sweet -- they "found" each other @ Paine. With the money troubles that Paine has, maybe they were more needing of the money, and just trusting of the "face".

corgimom
38451
Points
corgimom 05/08/14 - 09:45 am
0
1
Bizkit- Durbin, Leahy, Scott,

Bizkit- Durbin, Leahy, Scott, (D); Lee, Labrador, (R)

Bizkit
35567
Points
Bizkit 05/08/14 - 11:02 am
1
0
Who cares if it is

Who cares if it is bipartisan-I don't support Dems or Reps they both have a terrible track record. I just think it is crazy and will likely end up in the courts to SCOTUS as a states rights issue. The states have mandatory sentences and now the fed will usurp it-I don't think states are going to take kindly to it. Now do I think these laws are fair or system-hell no.

kiwiinamerica
982
Points
kiwiinamerica 05/09/14 - 09:30 pm
0
0
I wonder how Cooper's instructors feel............
Unpublished

.....now they know he's real handy with a gun and packs heat.

Just what you want to hear after you've given the guy an "F" on his final exam.

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