Teen takes money after bank mistake

Friday, March 28, 2014 12:31 PM
Last updated 8:24 PM
  • Follow Crime & courts

A banking error created a fat bank account for a north Georgia teenager, whom Madison County sheriff’s deputies said went on a spending spree and pocketed $20,000 in cash.

The error occurred March 7, when a Madison County man went into First Citizens Bank on U.S. Highway 29, Hull, and made a $31,000 deposit, but because there are several people by the same name with accounts at the bank, the teller put the money into the wrong account, according to the sheriff’s report.

On March 17, the victim called the bank about the money missing from his account. Tellers looked into the matter and discovered the error, deputies said. However, by that time, the 18-year-old Hull, Ga., man who wrongly received the money had withdrawn $20,000 cash and spent $5,000 using his ATM card, deputies said.

The suspect came back into the Hull branch on March 18 wanting to withdraw more money, but a teller informed him of the mistake and asked him to return the money, deputies said. The teen then insisted the money was from an inheritance.

A deputy went to the teen’s house, where the teen again said he thought the money came from his grandmother’s estate.

The deputy told the teen the bank wants the money back as soon as possible, so the teen told the officer he would go to the bank and try to settle the matter without going to jail, according to the report.

However, the teen never showed back at the bank and banking officials told investigators last week that if the suspect didn’t return the money, they would prosecute.

No charges have been filed yet, Investigator Doug Martin said Tuesday.

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Navy Gary
1615
Points
Navy Gary 03/28/14 - 12:43 pm
11
7
Ha Ha

No charges have been filed because no crime was committed. Bank error in your favor!!! I think the bank can reclaim what is left but there is no way for them to force a repay. That is if he changes banks. They are just going to have to say OOPS!!!

internationallyunknown
4166
Points
internationallyunknown 03/28/14 - 01:08 pm
0
3
Ha, ha.

Prosecute??

triscuit
3064
Points
triscuit 03/28/14 - 01:31 pm
9
1
What the kid did was wrong,

What the kid did was wrong, but the Bank made the mistake.

pgapeach2
1170
Points
pgapeach2 03/28/14 - 01:56 pm
7
0
Banks do make mistakes

I remember when Georgia Federal Bank was located on 15th street. My mom had $1,200 erroneously deposited into her checking account. She tried for three months to give the money back since she did not make the deposit, but the bank would not take it. She held onto it for a couple more months then eventually spent it.

stuaby
3875
Points
stuaby 03/28/14 - 01:57 pm
0
3
I can't resist it. Adjust

I can't resist it. Adjust the lyrics for this kids case:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7KjQrUVJ10

Marinerman1
4805
Points
Marinerman1 03/28/14 - 01:58 pm
7
0
Give It Back

The bank can go after what has not been spent. It is "ill gotten gain". The kid screwed up when he said he would go to the bank, and never did. Don't lie to a law enforcement officer. My hunch is that the gentleman showed up with the cash, but no deposit ticket. If he had used a ticket, the teller would have been able to verify the account. She probably did an alpha-search, and picked the wrong person.

billcass
781
Points
billcass 03/28/14 - 02:04 pm
15
1
Sad

The comments on this link sadden me. Yes, the bank made a mistake, but the kid kept the money, apparently knowing it was not his. That is not only a crime, it is morally wrong. Yet many of you are willing to give the kid a pass. No wonder our society is falling apart.

billcass
781
Points
billcass 03/28/14 - 02:05 pm
11
1
Navy Gary

It absolutely is a crime. What if the bank had put a million bucks in the kids account because a teller punched in too many zeros. You are saying it is not a crime for the kid to keep it? Thankfully the law doesn't work that way.

Red Headed Step Child
4042
Points
Red Headed Step Child 03/28/14 - 02:19 pm
9
1
That is true - the bank made

That is true - the bank made a mistake and they will most likely face a $25k + loss. That teenager has no intention of doing the right thing. Not to mention, if he's already spent it, where the heck is he going to get the money to pay it back? His forthcoming inheritance? It's unfortunate that the teller will lose their job over something that should have been easy to avoid.

The bank should prosecute. Just because an error was made, it doesn't mean that you are entitled to that money. Money doesn't just "appear" in your account when you inherit - but then, this is a teenager we're talking about, so I wouldn't expect them to know any different. That's of course assuming the whole inheritance thing isn't BS.

Curious as to what he spent the money on...

Dseven
155
Points
Dseven 03/28/14 - 03:06 pm
8
4
Don't lie to a law enforcement officer???

Are you kidding me... I grew up around law enforcement officers, detectives, family advocates, lawyers, etc... and I can say from personal experience, all they do is lie. Why is it ok for law enforcement to lie but not anyone else. screw that.

foxsilong
734
Points
foxsilong 03/28/14 - 03:22 pm
7
1
The teen WILL give it back

Have you heard of auditing and reconciliation?
I do this kind of work at my job all day. A lot of companies do that.
Just because we didn't bill you due to technical or human error, doesn't mean you get it for free. We'll just bill you later. If it was a human error, the responsible person get in trouble, but it doesn't mean that the error will be left as is.

For those of you who think you can get away with "free" things because of someone else's error, say that again to your parents, your religion leader and your boss (if you have one.)

Red Headed Step Child
4042
Points
Red Headed Step Child 03/28/14 - 03:31 pm
6
1
Tip of the day to a teller:

Tip of the day to a teller: Search for a customer's account using their SSN, not their name. Or, when all else fails - verify the stinkin' mailing address! Works every time...

Navy Gary
1615
Points
Navy Gary 03/28/14 - 03:46 pm
6
3
No crime...

It's not a crime to be immoral, if it were, half the politicians and all of the gays would be in jail. Make no mistake about it, the bank screwed themselves out of this money. If it were 25,000 or 25,000,000, same story. If it is no longer in the account, they have NO recourse.

avidreader
3166
Points
avidreader 03/28/14 - 04:57 pm
0
2
To Stuaby!

Good choice in music.

like-it-is
320
Points
like-it-is 03/28/14 - 05:14 pm
3
1
Tip for RED HEADED STEP CHILD

There are thousands of people that go into banks to make deposits for other folks. They Don't Have Other People SS#. Some don't even know the STINKING Address of people that's related to them. In other words, it DON'T WORK EVERY TIME............JUST SAYING!

Red Headed Step Child
4042
Points
Red Headed Step Child 03/28/14 - 05:46 pm
5
0
@Navy Gary

They do have recourse - they can prosecute, as they do in the case of bank robberies. They will take any and every legal action they can to get those funds back. I'd be surprised if a judge considered this one of those "windfall" cases.

Red Headed Step Child
4042
Points
Red Headed Step Child 03/28/14 - 05:59 pm
6
0
@like-it-is

That's true. People do make deposits for others. In this case it was the account holder that came in, so it was a simple enough thing to do. If someone comes in to make a deposit for another person and 1. doesn't have the account number for that person or 2. can't tell you any other identifying information for that account holder and there is no way to verify which account it needs to go in to or 3. the person making the deposit can't call the account holder to find out the necessary information or give the teller the customer's contact information then the teller would be wise to refuse the transaction until they can be sure it is being applied to the proper account. Just saying...

BTW - I worked in banking for MANY years, so I kind of know what I'm talking about...

Navy Gary
1615
Points
Navy Gary 03/28/14 - 06:00 pm
2
1
RHSC...

I think they would have recourse IF the "teen" spent the money KNOWING it wasn't his. If he can prove the inheritance story, he may have an out. I agree he should pay it back but it will probably be by his choice, except of course for what's left in the account. The bank has already scooped that back up. They also have insurance that'll pay the rest. I doubt $31,000 is going to break them anyways...lol.

Red Headed Step Child
4042
Points
Red Headed Step Child 03/28/14 - 06:13 pm
6
0
@Navy Gary

LOL.. yeah, it's most likely a loss but insurance doesn't pay for situations like this - insurance only pays in the case of a bank robbery. I'd be very surprised if there was any validity to the inheritance story.

TrulyWorried
14024
Points
TrulyWorried 03/28/14 - 06:16 pm
5
0
$31,000 error

An individual depositing such a large sum should be intelligent enough to check his deposit slip - and know his account number. I know I would if I had that much money to deposit (I wish).

Navy Gary
1615
Points
Navy Gary 03/28/14 - 06:21 pm
3
0
LOL,

That's a big ouchy! Oh well, as usual, the cost gets passed on to their customers. Like B of A for instance...they got fined 13 billion and there went my free checking account....lol. The fine becomes a "bank tax" that gets passed down to the banks' customers.

rmwhitley
5547
Points
rmwhitley 03/28/14 - 06:34 pm
0
0
The boy
Unpublished

will make a fine democratic candidate in future elections. No character. Will, in my opinion, commit a more serious crime in the future that could cost someone their life.

Truth Matters
6745
Points
Truth Matters 03/28/14 - 06:57 pm
2
0
Dear Ms. Bank Teller: My

Dear Ms. Bank Teller:
My account number is 987-654-321. You may add money to it at anytime!

signed:
Grateful customer.

corgimom
32142
Points
corgimom 03/28/14 - 07:07 pm
2
2
Red Headed, I wondered about

Red Headed, I wondered about that myself.

At Wells Fargo, if you don't have the info, you have to show id.

corgimom
32142
Points
corgimom 03/28/14 - 07:08 pm
0
4
I don't think an 18 year old

I don't think an 18 year old would know enough about banking laws to know that he couldn't spend the money.

Eighteen year old boys aren't known for their good sense.

Red Headed Step Child
4042
Points
Red Headed Step Child 03/28/14 - 07:37 pm
1
0
@corgi

You definitely have to pay attention to the details - especially when there are common/same names! As in this case, failure to to do so can result in some pretty big problems. As for IDs, you'd be amazed how many people curse out tellers because they have the nerve to ask them for identification!! Woo, I don't miss those days!

galaxygrl
1197
Points
galaxygrl 03/28/14 - 10:43 pm
3
0
The teen is wrong

Corgi,
The teen is wrong but do you know how many 18 year olds can not even write a check now days. My daughter is mathematically talent, a senior in college and I still have to explain banking rules to her. Book smart, yes.

talkrightmommy
58
Points
talkrightmommy 03/28/14 - 11:17 pm
1
0
He needs to return all the money real fast

Those commenters who think the kid has any right to keep any of this money because the bank made a mistake don't know right from wrong and don't understand the law. It's really simple -- if you keep or spend other people's money you are committing a crime called larceny. If he doesn't return the money (all of it) he WILL go to jail.

nocnoc
42411
Points
nocnoc 03/29/14 - 08:22 am
1
0
He can be charged with a Felony

This isn't a game of Monopoly.
Up to the point of removing HIS $$$ from the account he was legal.
He might could have even argued a few hundred over and got off.

BUT When he came back to get more and using a False Statement to acquire the funds, he knew did not belong to him it became Federal Bank Fraud.

See for yourself
http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/1344

He is looking at Federal Charges.
He can now be fined up to $1,000,000 or imprisoned not more than 30 years, or both.
==========================

BTW:
Whatever happen regarding the Cracker Barrel Diamond Ring criminal case and the Female Public Defender Lawyer.
Were the charges dropped quietly and if so why?
Its been well over 360 days, long past typical court calendar duration for a trial.

Also what was the outcome or a "friends" pistol being stolen out a ADA's SUV in the "Court House secured garage".

Too many times Headlines draw us into a story, but we never read conclusion.

Too many of us, it is like never knowing who shot J.R. Ewing.

Bizkit
31244
Points
Bizkit 03/29/14 - 09:31 am
0
0
NocNoc is correct-he is a

NocNoc is correct-he is a felon. But he is in good company-many politicians, some posters, your neighbor. LOL.

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