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Two women accused of prostituting teen in Augusta will be held without bond

Monday, Nov. 18, 2013 6:54 PM
Last updated 9:40 PM
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Two women accused of prostituting a teenager must remain in custody while awaiting trial in federal court, a magistrate judge ruled Monday.

Allison Barnes and Shelica J. Daniels – as well as William W. Hart and Heather L. Hedrick – were added as co-defendants when federal prosecutors re-indicted Charles H. Castillo last week.

Castillo was arrested Aug. 26 after arranging a “date” between an undercover officer and a 16-year-old girl at his apartment in Augusta.

The girl came to the attention of federal agents after they received a tip from the Nation Center for Missing & Exploited Children, Special Agent Charles McKee testified Monday. The teen was featured in an ad for adult services on an online classified Web site.

Castillo and his girlfriend Hedrick were at the apartment with the girl when agents arrived. McKee testified they also learned that the teen had been prostituted first by Daniels and then by Barnes and Hart, McKee testified.

The crime of child sex trafficking is punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of 15 years in prison.

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willie Lee
423
Points
willie Lee 11/19/13 - 06:17 am
1
10
Dumb A;SS Judges
Unpublished

A bond is for one reason and one reason only, to guarantee the accused will be in court. Bond is supposed to be denied for only one of two reasons; the accused is a flight risk or a danger to the community. This article tells about neither so it is safe to say the judge and the DA are keeping this guy in jail as punishment which is a constitutional violation. But this again is an example of the incompetent judges and the power of the bureaucrats who can't hack it on the outside.

InChristLove
22481
Points
InChristLove 11/19/13 - 07:50 am
5
1
Willie, I'd say they are a

Willie, I'd say they are a danger to the community. Sorry you see it differently. Sure wouldn't want them around my children. I'd say thank you judge!

JRC2024
9341
Points
JRC2024 11/19/13 - 09:51 am
2
1
Willie, who is the DA? I

Willie, who is the DA? I think it is you if you think those kind of people are ok. Thanks to the judge and do what is right and keep them for along time.

Young Fred
18095
Points
Young Fred 11/19/13 - 09:55 am
2
1
Willie has a point. Doesn't

Willie has a point.

Doesn't matter how disgusting the accused offense, there are laws that should be followed. Of course, in today's world, with examples from the president on down, "laws" seem to be a subjective term.

nocnoc
45125
Points
nocnoc 11/19/13 - 10:14 am
2
1
On the Bond Issue

While I may be taking a very unpopular position on this,
and even with myself.

I understand it is hard to stand by the US Constitution and Federal Judicial System guidelines regarding bonding sometimes, like in this case. But each are there to protect the citizens and their Civil Rights from the Government as much as they are to protect us from each other.

YES
Bond should always be set based on the crime, additional harm to the public or suspect if bonded, and the possibility of Failure to show.

So from time to time bond is denied bond to keep the suspects alive until the trial date.

e.g. Denying Bond has been used to prevent Lynchings.
Because in the OLD DAY'S (North and South), Judges would set bail and Vigilante Groups would take up a quick collection, pay the bondsman the whole bail amount, and have the pervert bonded out.

The person later was reported to have skipped bail, or could not make trial due to medical issues. But the problem with Vigilante Groups is they are illegal violate the suspected persons Constitutional Right and they usually only get the real criminal about 1/3 of the time.

In this case we have persons that were likely involved in the kidnapping (or at least after the fact) of this teen, and more than likely pimped her out against her will.

In this case, I would have fought with myself on granting or not granting bail, for more than 1 reason. Mainly knowing if convicted they will likely serve some of the time, and be back at it again in a few years.

Young Fred
18095
Points
Young Fred 11/19/13 - 10:38 am
2
2
nocnoc, Nice history lesson.

nocnoc,

Nice history lesson. I know this is bad...but I just became a fan of granting bond in each and every case!

nocnoc
45125
Points
nocnoc 11/19/13 - 11:24 am
3
1
Its a tough choice

but if and when when bond is granted to suspected vermin they should be required to wear GPS Wrist trackers that are made of Handcuff Steel.

An IF convicted then backtrack every place they visited, other wise delete the data trail.

Come to think of it (No PUN intended)
Now here's an idea GPS every violate Sex Offender as part of their life time Probation requirement.

Likely some Smart $$$ Geek would quickly develop a Tracking APP for that, for the public.

whyme
2002
Points
whyme 11/19/13 - 01:30 pm
0
0
thoughts

Once again I have to mention that you cannot make any assumptions based on the things that you read in the paper, see on tv, hear on the radio, etc. Whether on purpose to get you to read the article (think headlines on the Internet, for example) or whether the author truly does not have all of the information to share, unless you have first-hand knowledge of a situation, it is unwise and unhealthy to make assumptions based on the given data, one way or the other. It's a natural thing to do, and we are all entitled to our opinion but things get carried away when we do not have all of the facts.

With that said, I find it interesting that the comments only focus on whether proper laws were followed and the like. No concern was expressed over the crime perpetrated against this teen, and while there may be people that once again may make assumptions about her and her participation in the given events, human trafficking is such a horrible and prevalent crime that no one should be second-guessing anything.

nocnoc
45125
Points
nocnoc 11/19/13 - 01:38 pm
0
0
QUESTION - Because the Story Fails to SAY IT outright..

Did this happen in Augusta Richmond Co.,
Or was this the incident that happen somewhere else in GA?

Comment based on article as posted on Monday, Nov. 18, 2013
Last updated 9:40 PM

willie Lee
423
Points
willie Lee 11/19/13 - 08:49 pm
0
0
Missing the Point
Unpublished

The US and Georgia constitutions both prohibit excessive bail and no bail is about as excessive as one can get. Sure you can scream and shout, but remember, they might just be innocent. Our rights are based on the concept to protect the innocent and sometimes that means protecting the guilty also. For if we go down that slippery road, we will never come back. Please just sit back and think about this concept and imagine it being you, or a member of your family that is falsely accused, if you think law enforcement is going to help prove your innocence or that the D.A. cares about justice then you misunderstand the system. The innocent until proven guilty is an American myth that is proven every day.

nocnoc
45125
Points
nocnoc 11/19/13 - 09:33 pm
0
0
WL - If I may suggest something

Google each of their names with the word MUGSHOT after it.
A quick check showed 2 had priors.

In all actuality the Judge could be doing them a big favor.

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