Augusta man shot during home invasion Wednesday

Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012 11:40 AM
Last updated 8:41 PM
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An Augusta man was hospitalized after being shot in a home invasion Wednesday morning.



Richmond County sheriff’s Sgt. Dan Carrier said deputies called to the 2100 block of Stevens Road just before
1 a.m. found the injured James Lambert, 34.

Lambert told investigators that he answered a knock at the door to find two men with guns. During a confrontation, Lambert was wounded.

He was taken to Medical Col­lege of Georgia Hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening.

Deputies were called to another home invasion about 3:10 a.m. on Fox Trace Drive.

According to a police report, four men in black clothing and armed with handguns kicked in the back door yelling, “Richmond County Sher­iff’s Office. We have a search warrant.”

A 28-year-old woman at the home told deputies she tried to call 911 but that the men pointed a gun at her and made her get on the floor.

They left without taking anything.

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dichotomy
37677
Points
dichotomy 10/10/12 - 11:35 am
16
1
kicked in the back door of

kicked in the back door of the residence yelling "Richmond County Sheriff’s Office. We have a search warrant.”

And THEREIN lies the problem with "no knock" search warrants. ANYONE who kicks my door in is going to be fired on if I can get to my weapon. Any fool can holler "sheriff's department" and kick your in your door in the middle of the night but that holds no more validity or legality than someone putting flashing lights in the grill of their car and pulling people over on a deserted road. Now that the cops have decided to hood up like thuggies, wear all dark colors like thuggies, and behave like thuggies, I feel no obligation to take that extra few seconds to attempt to get them to verify who they are. ANYONE who kicks my door in during the night will be assumed to be the bad guys and if I live through it I will let the jury sort it out. I would hate to injure or kill a police officer but in the middle of the night I will err on MY side.

There has just been to many cases of sloppy police work, breaking into the wrong residences, and too many thuggies impersonating this technique to take any chances. "No knock" warrants are the ultimate violation of civil rights when the cops bust into the home of an innocent family.

Riverman1
94431
Points
Riverman1 10/10/12 - 12:54 pm
10
2
Dichotomy makes a good point.

Dichotomy makes a good point. Police should have at least one marked car outside so the resident can verify who they are.

Riverman1
94431
Points
Riverman1 10/10/12 - 01:02 pm
7
2
Questions for RCSO

Since there were two last night and it's happened before in the county, I'd like for someone at the RCSO to respond how to handle such a circumstance. What is the RCSO policy about searches and so on? Should the door be answered or should 911 be called?

happychimer
19624
Points
happychimer 10/10/12 - 01:51 pm
7
0
I am not answering my door at

I am not answering my door at that time of night. I don't care who they say they are. If they holler police, I will call 911. If they break in my door, they are going bye bye for good.

Riverman1
94431
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Riverman1 10/10/12 - 03:44 pm
10
2
Yeah, what Happychimer brings

Yeah, what Happychimer brings up is the problem the way I see it, too. It's just unsafe for the resident and law enforcement. If an armed person doesn't answer and someone kicks in the door and everyone is armed, there's no way bullets won't start flying everywhere. I mean just think...the officer is going to confront an armed scared citizen aiming at him. The officer is a better man than I am if he doesn't shoot.

The first thing an innocent resident is going to do when anyone starts beating on their door at night, if he has a gun, is get it. Shooting through the door at someone trying to knock it down wouldn't be unthinkable.

Unless there's some deadly crime going on, I'd think it would be best to let officers with at least one or two uniformed and in a black and white handle it the next day. That's why I'd like to hear a spokesman from RCSO comment on how best to handle this situation since we have a rash of these invasions going on.

An idea would be after officers are in place, they call the resident and tell them to call the RCSO to verify they are law enforcement.

skyblueyez76
2
Points
skyblueyez76 10/10/12 - 08:28 pm
0
1
I seriously don't think I

I seriously don't think I would be answering my door for anyone at that time of the morning. As for the comment about people putting lights in the grill of their vehicles and pulling over people..I think they should be illegal. However, if you are pulled over by someone doing that it's best to get a tag number and call it in. They are not to be used to impersonate law enforcement.

KSL
144927
Points
KSL 10/11/12 - 02:38 am
5
1
Do the law enforcement

Do the law enforcement officers tell you not to get out of the car? How do you then get the tag nunber of the car behind you?

KSL
144927
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KSL 10/11/12 - 03:00 am
5
1
Looking for money

Probably looking for money "owed" to them.
Money they are not claiming on their tax returns while staying with the baby mama in the government proviided abode.

KSL
144927
Points
KSL 10/11/12 - 03:01 am
4
1
Not that they even file tax

Not that they even file tax returns.

myfather15
57307
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myfather15 10/11/12 - 05:09 am
3
1
First of all, it is already

First of all, it is already policy for AT LEAST one marked unit (vehicle) to be the first car to pull into the driveway, and at least one uniformed deputy approaches the front door. The vast majority of times, there are many more than one uniformed deputies or officers involved in search warrants (Usually 10 or more). Narcotics investigators are usually the only ones on a search warrant that are wearing plain clothes, and they usually don't lead, going into the house. Thats uniformed deputies. They might go with the uniformed deputies because you want to get in the house as quickly as possible, but they won't lead.

I've been a deputy for 15 years and have participated in hundreds of search warrants. In my 15 years, I've never participated in one where we hit the wrong house or apartment. I know, I know, it has happened before with departments, but with all the requirements needed to get a no knock search warrant today, it's EXTREMELY RARE.

No knock search warrants have many requirements that must be met. You must have a VERY detailed description of the residence, to include windows, window shades, lights normally on, mailboxes, color of residence, color of shades and blinds, and numbers posted on the residence, a detail description of the interior of the residence, to include locations of all bathrooms, bedrooms, kitchen, living room, which is usually obtained from the confidential informant. The magistrate will most times want to see a written detailed layout of the residence and the plan of entry. Which will also be gone over before executing the search warrant. Then for a no knock warrant, you must prove the existence of weapons or firearms, which is usually through the informant and their observations while inside the residence.

It isn't like most of you see on TV. A no knock search warrant requires weeks of investigations. Including but not limited to, personal surveillance of the residence which is usually for MANY hours or days, video surveillance of the residence, numerous informant buys from the residence (NEVER just one purchase). Documentation of all vehicles known to be driven by residents of the house, documentation of all vehicles coming from and going to the house while you're doing surveillance.

The point is that there is so much goes into a narcotics no knock warrant or any no knock warrant, that it's very difficult to get it wrong. We deputies can not help the fact there are gang bangers out here mimmicking law enforcement in their criminal behaviors. I won't comment about this particular person since I don't know him, but most of the situation I've seen where people have done this, it has been gang bangers robbing other drug dealers. Because they have knowledge the person keeps large sums of cash or drugs within the house. Drug dealers robbing drug dealers goes on all the time.

Now, it is difficult to best tell a person how to deal with such a situation. I'm a firm believer in defending ones self and home with force if needed. I also don't want to get shot the next time we are doing a search warrant. Normally when criminals are planning to do a home invasion (these are planned), it involves numerous members just as this one did. You might shoot one of them and scare the rest of them off, but then you might get outgunned after shooting one and lose your life in return. It's very difficult, as each situation is different. But one of the best ways to help yourself is to dial 911 as soon as you can, put the phone down while still on. The dispatcher will be able to hear whats going on and hopefully the invaders won't know the phone is connected to 911. Dispatchers will know whether they have units in that area preforming a search warrant. They will be able to hear whats going on and relay that to responding deputies. Hopefully, while responding, the offenders won't realize whats happening. It's not full proof by any means, but its a pretty good idea and better than taking on a gang of armed criminals.

Besides that, don't sell drugs or hang around those who do, and the chances of it happening to you are slim at best.

CobaltGeorge
177188
Points
CobaltGeorge 10/11/12 - 05:59 am
2
2
Thanks myfather15

for setting everybody straight. That should prevent all the off the wall comments made and to be made.

CABoatright
188
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CABoatright 10/11/12 - 06:22 am
1
0
Snakeshot
Unpublished

A close friend told me once, that you should load one 'snakeshot' & the rest s/b hollow points...the 'snakeshot' will scatter & scatter the thugs as well. If one of the thugs is stupid enough to stay put after the snakeshot, they will then enjoy a 38 hollow point.

dstewartsr
20393
Points
dstewartsr 10/11/12 - 07:06 am
3
1
Myfather, while I deeply respect you

... and your fellow peace officers, that reply ... well, sucked. Basically, you're telling us not to worry our little heads about it. "No knock search warrants have many requirements that must be met," might be true, or not, but lying to judges for warrants (and convictions) is something that must be taught at the academy, because it's endemic to the "justice" system. For every 'no-knock' warrant wrongly served that makes the news, there are a dozen we don't. Your advice is to lay down and take it. You also do not address the growing problem of "swatting"- where the police are tipped off with false information in order to get them to raid the home of someone the tipster wishes harm.

Calling 911 is a good idea-- depending on where you live. But the notion of greeting a gang with a phone in your hand instead of waiting in a corner with a large magazine fed weapon is nonsense. You seem to be saying don't engage the thugs so you won't be hurt. Bushwah! These days it is safer for them to kill than to leave witnesses, a result of a "justice" system which appears to believe if the homeowner hadn't wanted to be a victim he would not have lived there.

So, don't worry, "the chances of it happening to you are slim at best." How many dead victims in a slim chance?

Little Lamb
49274
Points
Little Lamb 10/11/12 - 07:38 am
2
1
No Knock

I read the above comments thoughtfully. I imagined such an event happening, i.e., officers breaking into a home with a "no-knock" warrant and the home unfortunately being the wrong home. Some of the commenters said they would shoot the intruders as quickly as they could.

If the intruders were burglars (also known as home invaders), you might have a good chance of surviving. But if they were law enforcement, they would have Kevlar on and you would not stand a chance.

Riverman1
94431
Points
Riverman1 10/11/12 - 08:08 am
3
1
Myfather, that was a good

Myfather, that was a good post and cleared up many things. It sounds like a good policy is in place in RCSO using a marked car and uniformed officers. I do note that you said "usually" a lot. I hope it's rare that such procedures are not used.

However, I do remember an incident that happened about 3-4 years ago when two plainclothes officers in an unmarked car confronted a man by surprise as he was backing up in his driveway and bullets flew from both sides killing the man. That case was thoroughly investigated and it was determined the officers had done no wrong. I completely agree with that finding.

This man was involved in drugs, more than likely, and it's understandable bad things happen to bad people. But that incident brings up questions of procedure. Were they going into the house? They were already on his property and surprised him without wearing uniforms.

It's these anomalies that bother me and not the "usual" procedures. However, I agree the "usual" procedures seem to be safe as can be for resident and officer alike.

dstewartsr
20393
Points
dstewartsr 10/11/12 - 08:34 am
3
1
LL, I usually agree with you

... but this time you're wrong. Ask any officer the chances of his vest stopping 7.62 NATO round, or even 7.62 x 39 from an AK-style weapon.* And NOTHING currently issued will resist a 12-gauge close range head shot with OO buckshot.

* About the same as my chances for sainthood.

TK3
562
Points
TK3 10/11/12 - 11:09 am
1
1
Vests

LL even crooks can buy Kevlar that is why you aim a shotgun at face level or practice headshots with a pistol and or as noted, have a respectable cal. rifle like the 7.62x39 that will go through vest like a hot knife in butter.
I shoot anyone who crashes through my door, day or night no matter what they yell out and if Big Brother jack boots makes the mistake of hitting the wrong door, and its mine, some of them at least, without a doubt are NOT going to be able to ever make the same mistake again.

Riverman1
94431
Points
Riverman1 10/11/12 - 05:51 pm
0
0
I'm watching ABC News tonight

I'm watching ABC News tonight with Dianne Sawyer and it's being reported false calls are causing raids on homes across the nation. This is a real problem.

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