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Battery thefts attributed to oversight in law

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Battery thefts have increased over the past few weeks, an ironic result of a new Georgia law aimed at stopping metal theft.

Battery thefts have increased over the past month. In order to deter thieves, batteries can be engraved with identifying marks or painted.  SUMMER MOORE/STAFF
SUMMER MOORE/STAFF
Battery thefts have increased over the past month. In order to deter thieves, batteries can be engraved with identifying marks or painted.


Richmond County sheriff’s Investigator Kendall Brown put out a warning at the end of June, before the new law took effect July 1. Because it allowed recyclers to pay cash on the spot for batteries and aluminum cans, Brown predicted battery thefts would increase, which he said has happened over the past month. The law requires recyclers to pay for all other metals with a check.

“A lot of these metal thieves are looking to feed their drug habit,” Brown said. “By making them cash a check, it is easier for law enforcement to follow the paper trail.”

Brown said he has received reports of battery thefts at homes and businesses, especially car lots and automotive repair shops. He said thieves are breaking into everything from cars to dump trucks – even farm equipment.

“Unfortunately the new metal theft law … does not regulate batteries, making it difficult to catch the thieves responsible,” Brown said in a news release.

He offered some preventative tips, saying batteries can be engraved with identifying marks or written on with paint pens. He also recommended coloring batteries with neon paint, which can deter thieves and helps law enforcement identify stolen property when it turns up at recycling centers.

Comments (8)

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OpenCurtain
10049
Points
OpenCurtain 09/17/12 - 07:09 am
5
1

Thieves and junkies

will always find a way to obtain quick cash without earning it.

Does any one else see the pattern here?

1. Government; after years of watching a problem occur, finally responds, but leaves a new side door open.
2. The Problem types figure out the new side door is now open.
3. Go to back to #1.

seenitB4
72618
Points
seenitB4 09/17/12 - 07:54 am
2
1

I agree curtain

Sometimes I feel we are like the cat chasing the tail.....

useful
552
Points
useful 09/17/12 - 09:32 am
3
0

brown was right about more

brown was right about more batteries being stole,but once it gets where you are paid by check for them.there will be more homes broken into,because the drug users are going to need money to feed the habit.

itsanotherday1
34614
Points
itsanotherday1 09/17/12 - 11:27 am
4
0

Simple solution

If I am not mistaken, batteries are serialized. They should require the junker to copy down the serial number and associate it with an ID and photograph of the seller. These countertop cameras attached to computers are cheap, and anyone selling scrap legitimately would not mind the 15 extra seconds it takes to get recorded.

On the consumer side, if you are worried about theft, copy down the serial numbers on your batteries. Shouldn't take any more effort than spray painting it.

OpenCurtain
10049
Points
OpenCurtain 09/17/12 - 01:11 pm
3
0

Just how do you mark a battery for later ID?

*The case is plastic, and any thief will just melt the ID or marking off with a simple $10 wood burning set.

* Spray paint it and the Thief will only spray over it.

Given the above.
I went to the dollar store and purchase a few $1.00 stick on window alarms.

I purchased a Driveway Patrol system ($17.95) at Harbor Freight. I placed the transmitter on the dash and the receiver next to the bed and my pistol. A very KISS car burglar warning system.

Common.sense
445
Points
Common.sense 09/17/12 - 12:58 pm
4
0

OpenCurtain

They make a uv marker that is not visible under regular light. It is recommended by a lot of Sheriff's Office that people mark their belongings with a uv marker. It will help with recovery of the items when placed under ultraviolet lights.

itsanotherday1
34614
Points
itsanotherday1 09/17/12 - 02:42 pm
1
0

"They will burn off markings"

"They will burn off markings" Well then, they just made it unsalable. If a serial number is required for scrapping, they can't scrap it then can they?

Besides, you give the thieves too much credit; I can't imagine they are industrious enough to go to a lot of trouble over a $4 battery.

Bacon Grease
253
Points
Bacon Grease 09/18/12 - 12:03 pm
0
0

Love

They need love and some poetry read to them, perhaps even a big hug.

Simonstar
4
Points
Simonstar 12/11/12 - 11:33 pm
0
0

If everyone knows how to

If everyone knows how to protect their battery from being stolen, the crime would definitely drop. The recyclers have a duty to check all the batteries that come in, whether they have special markings on them or whether these batteries are still fully charged.

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