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Gun violence more likely in Richmond County than in Georgia, US

US, state rates topped

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It’s three times more likely that a gun will be involved in an aggravated assault in Rich­mond County than the nation as a whole, according to the latest crime data from the FBI.

The FBI’s 2010 Uniform Crime Report showed that 56 percent of aggravated assaults in Richmond County ended in someone being shot. The national average is 18 percent; in Georgia, 25 percent.

The Richmond County percentage is actually down from previous years. In 2007 and 2008, more than 70 percent of aggravated assaults were shootings – four times the U.S. rate and nearly three times Georgia’s rate. Data for 2009 were not available.

Lt. Calvin Chew oversaw the Richmond County Sher­iff’s Office’s violent crimes division until January, when he became the administrative lieutenant over criminal investigations. He attributed the county’s high numbers to the wide availability of guns, legal or otherwise.

“It’s not a hard thing to do to get your hands on a gun,” Chew said. “Guns are just more available in the South and the criminal element is well-armed.”

William Reese, a professor of criminal justice and sociology at Augusta State Univer­sity, said the area’s high rate of gun violence could be attributed to two major factors: Augusta’s location and the culture of the South in general.

“Here in the South, there’s a tendency to settle interpersonal disputes with violence instead of discussion or calling the police to intervene,” he said. “Firearms also carry prestige around here. It’s a symbol of status and kids want that reputation, that mark of manhood.”

Reese also said Augusta is part of a long corridor of illegal guns regularly moving up the East Coast. Weapons come to the South on boats and planes and make their way up the coast, especially to New York, he said.

Reese said the corridor was becoming more evident on the federal level. He thinks many illegal weapons finish their journey north early when they find their way into the hands of area criminals.

“The availability of the guns is really all you need to know,” Reese said. “When the culture dictates that you solve those things with violence, shootings become statistically predictable.”

Chew said the tide has turned in the battle to get guns off the street and that the situation is improving.

“This became our main concern – to make the public safe,” he said. “Getting illegal guns off the street is a great way to do so, and we’re not going to stop until there are no illegal guns out there being
used during violent crimes.

“We’ve seen violent crimes and assaults committed with guns decrease every year since 2008. The progress from year to year has been gradual, but dropping from 73 percent in 2008 to 56 percent in 2010 is a huge step.”

Chew said recent sting operations – Operation Augusta Ink, Operation Fox Hunt and Operation Smoke Screen – led to the drop. The three undercover stings in the past five years resulted in more than 200 arrests and the seizure of at least 600 firearms.

Despite those successes, the battle against gun violence
is far from over, Chew said.

“We’ve let the criminals know we’re going to be actively going after them,” he said.

AGGRAVATED ASSAULTS

AREA - 2007 TOTAL - WITH GUNS

United States - 855,856 - 158,059 (18%)

Georgia - 22,569 - 6,042 (26%)

Richmond County - 185 - 133 (72%)

AREA - 2008 TOTAL - WITH GUNS

United States -  834,885 - 153,476 (18%)

Georgia - 20,206 - 5,476 (27%)

Richmond County - 238 - 174 (73%)

AREA - 2010 TOTAL - WITH GUNS

United States - 778,901 -  138,403 (18%)

Georgia - 20,287 - 5,160 (25%)

Richmond County - 273 - 153 (56%)

Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation, Richmond County Sheriff’s Office. All statistical information was pulled from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reports, 2007-2010 or from Richmond County Sheriff’s Office monthly crime reports. The 2009 Uniform Crime Report for Richmond County did not include a breakdown of the weapons with which violent crimes were committed, The 2011 report is yet to be released in its entirety.

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Riverman1
81426
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Riverman1 08/20/12 - 04:43 pm
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Harley, segregation in the

Harley, segregation in the South was officially sanctioned until about 1965. Much later in subtle ways. That's going to take awhile to get past. Longer than 45 years. Your part about government inspired dependence with welfare and so on is abolutely correct.

The population of the old city of Augusta until consolidation in 1994 was 44,000.

harley_52
22825
Points
harley_52 08/20/12 - 04:46 pm
1
1
Thanks....

....seenitB4. Kind of you to say that.

Now that I re-read it, I could have said it better if I'd used 3 sentences instead of one. I seem to get carried away sometimes and get stingy with periods.

seenitB4
84264
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seenitB4 08/20/12 - 04:50 pm
3
1
Also

I want to gently remind RM that our parents & grandparents lived through the Great Depression......if that wasn't a downer I don't know what would be.....some pics of my kin looked like concentration starving skeletons......DIRT POOR...many were......so to say that only the blacks have had obstacles to overcome isn't quite fair....

harley_52
22825
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harley_52 08/20/12 - 05:01 pm
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Riverman...

...segregation wasn't just a Southern issue. Neither was "racism." I grew up in Michigan and Illinois and they were desegregated about the same time. To this day, I believe "racism" is more prevalent North of the Mason-Dixon line than below it.

Nowadays, society, driven by Political Correctness, exacerbates and prolongs "racism" in lots of ways. There are many examples I could give you, but you know them as well as I do. "Black History Month," "One Hundred Black Men In Augusta," the NAACP, Affirmative Action....all of these things accentuate the racial divide and insure we won't be "colorblind" anytime soon.

Personally, I don't believe there are ANY contemporary black citizens who suffer any effects of slavery and the only ones who suffer from "racism" do so at their own doing, or the government's.

But to focus on the crime issue......neither slavery, nor segregation, have anything to do with it and to suggest it does only feeds the PC problem we live with today.

Just my two cents......

Willow Bailey
20580
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Willow Bailey 08/20/12 - 05:15 pm
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Absolutely, harley and all

Absolutely, harley and all the while motivated by their own personal desire for wealth and power. Though the owners have changed hands, The Plantation is alive , but not well. Government does not love the poor, they love their own pocketbooks. Government doesn't care about unborn babies, they covet the votes of women and men who find themselves in this situation. Same scenario for gays, illegals and feminists... using them.

We keep looking to the problem makers for the solution and it is never going to happen. Real change, good change will take place when people stop playing the victim and take responsibility for their own choices.

Like Fiat, now, can I get an Amen?

bdouglas
4835
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bdouglas 08/20/12 - 05:00 pm
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1
Saying Richmond County is

Saying Richmond County is safest among its peers seems a bit pointless to me. Richmond County is also safest among itself, Fulton County, Wayne County (Detroit), Michigan, and Dade County (Miami), Florida. I realize they aren't similar in size at all, but it's like taking the bottom of the barrel and saying one is 'least worse' than the others... If you all have a major problem, but you have the least drastic of a major problem, is that really something to boast about?

harley_52
22825
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harley_52 08/20/12 - 05:02 pm
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Amen....

....sister.

Willow Bailey
20580
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Willow Bailey 08/20/12 - 05:11 pm
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Grimace and give seenitb4 a thumbs up at 4:50!

I'm on her ignore list so she'll miss it. lol.

She's right on target with this one. For some people ADVERSITY builds character like nothing else on this earth. What makes the difference is whether we just go through hard times or whether we learn something from the hard times.

You can't learn if some enabler government removes your responsibility and accountability. If you don't learn at home, school teaches you, if don't learn in school, society will be your teacher, if society can't teach you, the law tries, if that fails, death follows.

harley_52
22825
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harley_52 08/20/12 - 05:26 pm
3
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Why do...

....blondes get more attention than brunettes?

Why do pretty people get hired over ugly ones?

Why do people with pretty smiles get hired before those with crooked teeth?

Why do most Generals' wives have cutesy names like Pixie, or Bambi?

Why do Army promotions favor black officers in percentages far greater than their representation in the force?

Life's a bit....er, stinker. Discrimination is everywhere. One thing you can do is sit around and whine about it and blame it for all your problems. Or, you can choose to rise above it and do the best you can with the way life really is, not worry about how you wish it was.

Wishing and hoping are not methods of achieving success. Neither is whining, or claiming you're a "victim."

Riverman1
81426
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Riverman1 08/20/12 - 05:50 pm
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Harley

Harley, in the north legalized discrimination was not the norm. In the South it was because of many reasons. Look, my ancestors had slaves picking cotton on the part of the plantation I inherited in Aiken County. You can't get anymore realistic than that.

In the Army, you and I dedicated much of our lives to, segregation stopped early and we recognized the fantastic black NCO's we had, and some officers, but that doesn't mean things were right in civilian life.

Don't lose track of the bigger goal of getting lower crime rates in the black community and improved results in our public schools in Richmond County.

CobaltGeorge
153292
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CobaltGeorge 08/20/12 - 06:06 pm
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Hey All, Does This Mean Anything?

From 1993 through 2001 blacks accounted for 46% of homicide victims and 54% of victims of firearm homicide but 12% of the U.S. population.

Yes, I'm still here because I haven't said anything.....but it sure has been great reading because remember I'm the most racist one on here.

harley_52
22825
Points
harley_52 08/20/12 - 06:21 pm
1
1
"Harley, in the north legalized discrimination....

....was not the norm. You're wrong about that statement, pal. I lived there and I can say for sure it was the norm.

"Don't lose track of the bigger goal of getting lower crime rates in the black community and improved results in our public schools in Richmond County."

Thanks for the advice and your efforts to keep me focused. I'm more than willing to discuss either crime rates or public school results. But I'm not so sure that is indeed the "bigger goal." Those issues are, in my opinion, simply symptoms of the REAL "bigger goal," which is equality and colorblindness across society. And I'm suggesting Political Correctness and the denial of of its effects are NOT helping to solve anything, just making things worse.

Riverman1
81426
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Riverman1 08/20/12 - 06:21 pm
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CGee is a realist.

CGee is a realist.

harley_52
22825
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harley_52 08/20/12 - 06:35 pm
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CG....

.....recognizes and admits reality.

Others avoid it and deny it.

Riverman1
81426
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Riverman1 08/20/12 - 06:55 pm
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Harley, "legalized"

Harley, "legalized" discrimination was the norm up north? I thought southern blacks went north to get jobs up there? It could be in your mind past racial discrimination means nothing as far as crime rates by blacks today. Or it could be you don't think the discrimination was significant? If you don't think lowering crime rates and raising public school scores are our main concern, what do you think is?

Riverman1
81426
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Riverman1 08/20/12 - 07:18 pm
2
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This simple, huh?

"Spartacus, you are free."

"Wow, thanks. How do I get my tickets to the Gladiators v. the Lions at the Coliseum?"

CobaltGeorge
153292
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CobaltGeorge 08/20/12 - 07:27 pm
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B4 Loves Reading "Gone With The Wind"

Nothing is better than reading RM, harley, WB and the out of the closet oldfella.

CobaltGeorge
153292
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CobaltGeorge 08/20/12 - 07:28 pm
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By The Way

Gave TP and upper today. one only.

harley_52
22825
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harley_52 08/20/12 - 08:10 pm
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Riverman said...

" I thought southern blacks went north to get jobs up there?"

Of course you did. That's the conventional wisdom, isn't it? And there's obviously some truth to it. But it's a logical error to assume moving someplace for economic gain necessarily means there was no discrimination in the destination. It could mean that the financial gain was worth putting up with some discrimination, couldn't it? Have you ever discussed it with a black family who moved South to escape the discrimination they experienced in the North? I have. Many of them. I think you've fallen victim to the stereotypes.

" It could be in your mind past racial discrimination means nothing as far as crime rates by blacks today. Or it could be you don't think the discrimination was significant?" It "could be" lots of things. One of the things it "could be" is that I believe American society has (perhaps for good intentions, perhaps not) spent decades throwing money and special privileges on blacks all in the name of "reparations" for centuries past slavery and decades past racial discrimination. We've spent trillions of dollars teaching blacks they are incapable of taking care of themselves, incapable of rising above their life circumstances, incapable of making it on their own, and NOT responsible for any of their shortcomings. We've destroyed the black family. We've destroyed their self confidence. We've paid them to perpetuate the very problems that prohibit them from living normal lives and rising above the stereotype.

Black crime is, to a large extent, a fairly predictable result of intellectual ignorance, a lack of self, family, and societal discipline, and too much free time. They lack employable skills, they lack motivation, they lack discipline, they lack self confidence, they lack work experience, and they get to a point where they lack desire because they've been convinced it's all "not their fault" and that there's no hope for ever getting out because "whitey" is greedy, selfish, and "in charge."

When I say "they" do I mean all blacks? Of course not. Many rise above it. Many do not consider themselves hapless, helpless "victims." Many do not blame slavery, or discrimination for their problems, but find their own reasons and their own methods to achieve happiness and success.

We need to STOP with all the Politically Correct "poor victim" rationale and government programs that contribute to the problem, not the solution.

That's what I think.

palmetto1008
9782
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palmetto1008 08/20/12 - 08:22 pm
2
1
Briefly, blacks were
Unpublished

Briefly, blacks were definitely discriminated against in the north...particularly during the mid-20th century during the period of suburbanization of major urban areas. Blacks were locked in and left in the decaying urban areas...paying rent to slumlords. They were prevented from accumulating the typical means of wealth for the middle class which is through home ownership.

harley_52
22825
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harley_52 08/20/12 - 08:26 pm
4
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Absolutely, palmetto1008...

It's a myth that the North was free of racial discrimination and the South was a hotbed thereof.

But it's a popular and long standing myth for sure.

palmetto1008
9782
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palmetto1008 08/20/12 - 08:33 pm
2
1
You bet, Harley...it was not
Unpublished

You bet, Harley...it was not as blatant..but similar consequences..and actually buttressed by state and federal government.

Riverman1
81426
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Riverman1 08/20/12 - 08:40 pm
3
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" I thought southern blacks

" I thought southern blacks went north to get jobs up there?"

Of course you did. That's the conventional wisdom, isn't it? And there's obviously some truth to it."

Ha...well, I'll take your admission there is some truth.

Riverman1
81426
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Riverman1 08/20/12 - 08:44 pm
4
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Anybody who says blacks don't

Anybody who says blacks don't commit crimes disproportionate to their numbers is not being realistic. Anybody who says blacks are not coming out of an era of discrimination is not being realistic.

palmetto1008
9782
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palmetto1008 08/20/12 - 08:44 pm
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Hold on boys, river and
Unpublished

Hold on boys, river and Harley. You're both right.

palmetto1008
9782
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palmetto1008 08/20/12 - 08:54 pm
0
1
Your 844 is correct, river
Unpublished

Your 844 is correct, river man. But what is your point?

gargoyle
15566
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gargoyle 08/20/12 - 08:56 pm
2
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I'm sure someone has

I'm sure someone has mentioned this before in this thread ,but in case it hasn't.The charges brought have seemed light in this area for crimes commited. Car thieft for example might only bring a charge of poss. of stolen property.Assault only upped to agravated if it results in very serious injury

palmetto1008
9782
Points
palmetto1008 08/20/12 - 08:59 pm
1
1
Does not have to actually
Unpublished

Does not have to actually result In serious injury, the "threat" is enough. And that is a very subjective call...

Riverman1
81426
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Riverman1 08/20/12 - 09:10 pm
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Palmetto asked, "Your 844 is

Palmetto asked, "Your 844 is correct, river man. But what is your point?"

I dunno.

palmetto1008
9782
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palmetto1008 08/20/12 - 09:17 pm
0
1
Oh, ok...it's the brew.
Unpublished

Oh, ok...it's the brew.

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