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Woman, son sentenced to life for beating, murder

Woman, son plead guilty to 2009 death

Friday, May 11, 2012 11:42 AM
Last updated Friday, March 8, 2013 2:55 PM
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A Columbia County woman and her son pleaded guilty Friday to the 2009 beating death of Laverne “Kay” Parsons.

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Christopher Sean Bowers, 23, and his mother pleaded guilty in the murder case to avoid the death penalty. They had staged a shooting to clear them of suspicion.  JIM BLAYLOCK/STAFF
JIM BLAYLOCK/STAFF
Christopher Sean Bowers, 23, and his mother pleaded guilty in the murder case to avoid the death penalty. They had staged a shooting to clear them of suspicion.


Rebecca Bowers Sears, 44, and Christopher Sean Bowers, 23, offered negotiated guilty pleas during a sentencing hearing in Evans.

Superior Court Judge Sheryl B. Jolly sentenced them to life in prison without parole for murder, life in prison for armed robbery and 20 years for burglary, with the sentences to be served consecutively.

“It was a good resolution to the case to get it done on both defendants that quickly,” District Attorney Ashley Wright said after the hearing. “I hate to say ‘that quickly’ three years later.”

Columbia County sheriff’s deputies found a beaten and bloody Parsons in the garage of her Grovetown home in March 2009.

Authorities accused Sears and Bowers of beating her to death with a bat and a claw hammer.

“She’d been beaten very severely,” Wright said. “She’d been struck numerous times.”

Deputies arrested the pair a few days later. They were indicted on murder, armed robbery and burglary charges in April 2010.

In previous court appearances, prosecutors said Sears had an affair with Parsons’ husband and orchestrated the murder to eliminate her romantic rival.

To try to derail the investigation, Sears and Bowers staged a shooting days after Parsons’ murder. Though Bowers meant only to threaten his mother with a gun before a “witness” listening from Sears’ mobile phone, he actually pulled the trigger and shot her in the leg in front of her Augusta workplace, said Richmond County sheriff’s investigators.

Wright had intended to seek the death penalty.

“I think it is an appropriate case for the death penalty,” Wright said, adding that the pleas avoid the trauma of trials on the families involved. “It is, quite frankly, one of the grisliest murders I have ever seen.”

Attorneys for Sears and Bowers negotiated the guilty plea to avoid the possibility of being sentenced to death.

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Jake
34040
Points
Jake 05/11/12 - 11:49 am
6
0
Justice?

Quite frankly, I believe they should be dealt with in the same manner as which they dealt with their victim. The only problem with that is that no rational human being would want to administer that type of horrendous punishment.

double_standard
166
Points
double_standard 05/11/12 - 12:07 pm
2
4
How could a republican

How could a republican district attorney let them plea out of being sentenced to the needle. When is her term up?

nothin2show4it
120
Points
nothin2show4it 05/11/12 - 12:17 pm
1
1
Warped Justice System!
Unpublished

This is, as Ashley Wright put it, "a good resolution?"

So Parsons gets to die a horrible death and these two dirt bags get to live the rest of their life on tax payers money?

Our system of justice is broke and shouldn't even be call justice. Rather it should be called a black hole for tax payers money.

dichotomy
37418
Points
dichotomy 05/11/12 - 12:16 pm
6
1
Was Kay Parsons allowed to

Was Kay Parsons allowed to negotiate her death sentence? Would she have elected to be confined for life instead of being blugeoned to death?

Some people want to outlaw the death penalty. I say we should do just the opposite. We should keep the death penalty and outlaw the life sentence. We should force jurists to choose between letting murderers walk the streets again or putting them to death. Anything in between is a huge waste of money.

GaStang22
910
Points
GaStang22 05/11/12 - 01:21 pm
1
0
The bleeding heart justice
Unpublished

The bleeding heart justice system we have and bleeding hearts in general make me sick. The least they could do is make wastes of flesh like this have to work sun up til sun down to pay for their care in jail. But nooo the bleeding hearts can't have that. What a joke. They wanted to make a plea so they wouldn't get the death penalty.... yet they had no problem, not only killing, but slowly painfully beating a woman to death. Sorry cowards that do NOT deserve to live. I hope they get what they gave Kay a little at a time for a while so they can see just a fraction of what it must have been like for her and the terror and pain she felt. Then they can finish them for all I care and save us a lot of money caring for these wastes of flesh!!!

GaStang22
910
Points
GaStang22 05/11/12 - 01:27 pm
0
0
The bleeding heart justice
Unpublished

,,,

TrulyWorried
16487
Points
TrulyWorried 05/11/12 - 03:25 pm
1
0
Proven guilty

without the benefit of a doubt and they both get life sentences.

Have to correct entry - misread the headline about the juvenile sentenced in Columbia County - hope it can be retracted!

1313
119
Points
1313 05/11/12 - 05:03 pm
2
0
Death sentence

Some countries (Mexico/Canada/etc.) refused to extradite killers, rapists ect. back to the U.S. unless we agree to take the death penalty off the table. I suggest we refuse to extradite the same type of people back to them unless they agree to put the death penalty on the table. Let them beg a little bit like we have to do. While we are on the subject of the death penalty, I'm a little tired of the president giving the turkey a pardon at Thanksgiving. We need a president thats willing to follow through and put that boy on the dinner table.

nothin2show4it
120
Points
nothin2show4it 05/11/12 - 05:30 pm
0
0
Austin
Unpublished

Austin, even though your comments from your radio program don't show up here I think you are wrong in your assessment. Just because the DA says this is a good resolution doesn't mean that it is. It still sends a clear signal to criminals that you will not lose your life if you take one.

Secondly how dare them plead to keep their life after they've taken one so callously. The term dirt bag in my previous comment is to good for them.

realitycheck09
312
Points
realitycheck09 05/11/12 - 06:37 pm
3
0
I can understand everyone's

I can understand everyone's frustration due to the nature of the crime, but the DA just saved the taxpayers a LOT of money. A trial would have taken weeks if not months and they would have sat in prison for 20-30 years as their appeals ran through. After spending 5-10 million to prosecute (and defend) these folks, the state could execute them...assuming a jury unanimously voted for the death penalty. And assuming the Georgia Supreme Court let it stand.

That's a lot of assumptions when, today, the DA got a sure thing conviction and insured these folks never leave jail.

KSL
143582
Points
KSL 05/11/12 - 07:02 pm
2
0
Jake, I have to agree with

Jake, I have to agree with you whole heatedly and heartily.

Best regards to you, by the way.

gregleopard
150
Points
gregleopard 05/11/12 - 07:06 pm
1
5
Bloodlust

I enjoy reading of the bloodlust that so many of you seem to profess. I wonder if any of you ever actually had to "make the call"/"pull the trigger"/"push the button" to put someone to death you could actually do it. It is easy to talk a big game about killing when you are all hiding behind your little screen names.

Jake
34040
Points
Jake 05/11/12 - 07:12 pm
2
0
@KSL

And a big howdy to you as well. To stay on topic I would like to ask the ones that did this, "In hindsight, was this worth it? Throw away your lives to take the life of an innocent person? You both must not have been very upstanding people to begin with. I mean who in their right mind would whack a person with a hammer and a bat?".

itsanotherday1
48274
Points
itsanotherday1 05/11/12 - 07:24 pm
3
1
As a pragmatist, I have to

As a pragmatist, I have to agree with realitycheck.

gregleopard: Yes I could, and still sleep well at night. Some people just need killing and we are all better off for it. If I killed someone in an accident, it would be a totally different circumstance. That would be hard to get over.

KSL
143582
Points
KSL 05/11/12 - 07:25 pm
1
0
Absolutely, bloodlust.

Absolutely, bloodlust. Strange name you picked, by the way.

Jake
34040
Points
Jake 05/11/12 - 07:27 pm
2
0
Murder

I have had to put a couple of animals to sleep in my lifetime and I did not enjoy doing it but they were suffering beyond repair. The brutality of this murder should show no mercy as far as I am concerned. If it was a member of my immediate family that was killed then I would put these people to sleep as well. I would not relish doing it but I firmly believe that what you mete out, you should receive. I believe that for myself as well.

KSL
143582
Points
KSL 05/11/12 - 07:27 pm
1
1
Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh. Quick

Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh. Quick name change. Interesting!

KSL
143582
Points
KSL 05/11/12 - 07:39 pm
1
0
I had an elderly cousin who

I had an elderly cousin who was an old maid retired school teacher. She was an excellent teacher of first graders. She had never been married, was in her 90's when she her house was broken into and she was brutally raped by he intruder. The blood, they said, was profuse because she was so old and frail. It damaged her mind. The mood of the small community was not good. The sheriff investigating was well known. I could quote his name and you would have no trouble Googling him and finding a well know case when he was first elected. I didn't live there at the time, but I do know my father was ready to put the worthless perpetrator to sleep.

gregleopard
150
Points
gregleopard 05/11/12 - 07:44 pm
1
4
Specifics

So it is suggested that these people should be shown no mercy and therefore killed. But who should do the killing? Is it relegated only to the aggrieved family members? Do they get a free pass from the laws of the State of Georgia (do they have a time limit to effectuate the release of this anger); or do "we" select a proxy or an agent for our bloodlust. If "we" select a proxy or agent then, by definition, "we" become the killers.

KSL
143582
Points
KSL 05/11/12 - 07:47 pm
2
0
Mercy? You are are kidding.

Mercy? You are are kidding. What mercy was the victim shown?

KSL
143582
Points
KSL 05/11/12 - 07:54 pm
1
0
Who the heck is relegating

Who the heck is relegating the killing to the families of the victims? I won't begin to explain why the DA accepted plea bargain and did not go to trial. I don't begin to claim to second guess that. But what I can understand is the frustration of law abiding people who think that the brutal death they inflicted on the victim deserves more that a life from now on at taxpayer expenses.

realitycheck09
312
Points
realitycheck09 05/11/12 - 08:12 pm
2
1
@KSL - except that it's much

@KSL - except that it's much MUCH cheaper to let them live "life from now on at taxpayer expenses" than to try them, go through the next two decades of appeals (not to mention that the state will have to pay the cost of both prosecuting and defending said appeals), house them on death row, and then maybe - MAYBE - actually get to execute them. DA Wright should be commended for her judgment.

Cynical old woman
1111
Points
Cynical old woman 05/11/12 - 08:18 pm
2
0
Death penalty

Would be way to good for these lowlifes! The victim was brutally murdered these two deserve the same...lethal injection would be the easy way out. Living incarcerated is ridiculous and not nearly enough punishment.

gregleopard
150
Points
gregleopard 05/11/12 - 08:28 pm
0
4
To learn from history or to be destined to repeat it

So we are now back to the myopic concept of an "eye for an eye." I guess the fact that that concept has failed mankind since the origins of human history don't dissuade some of us from continuing the failed concept. That would require us to think rather than to simply act on our emotions.

nothin2show4it
120
Points
nothin2show4it 05/11/12 - 08:31 pm
0
0
gregleopard
Unpublished

!. Why should we let them live and sponge off the law biding tax payer?
2. Putting them to death is more humane that keeping them locked up for the rest of their life.
3. Putting blood thirsty murderers helps to deter other from committing the crime. I won't deter all people but the murder rates will go way down.
4. What makes you think that I should have the moral obligation to give my hard earned money to support the rest of their life?
5. In the grand scheme of life and nature there is life and death. It is a delicate balance of both. Animals kill by instinct for survival. Man has the ability to reason and develop a moral sense of community. When one violates that moral sense of community and rational reason they need to be removed from the community. The community should never be expected to support that person. Then the natural order of law is to put that individual to death so that they do not continue to kill others or promote the killing of others in the community.
6. Yes I could be the person to pull the trigger if need be. Let a person threaten me or my family or try to rob me or a member of my family and see what happens. I wouldn't think twice about pulling the trigger.

gregleopard
150
Points
gregleopard 05/11/12 - 08:39 pm
0
4
Emotion

I have noticed when you comment nothin2show4it, you are usually so eloquent. However, in your last post at 9:28, merely seconds after my own post, and with an unusually high rate of grammatical errors, you seem to be speaking out of rage and frustration to my position rather than from your senses. Your emotional writing makes my point for me. You have let this bloodlust consume you. I think you to be better than that.

realitycheck09
312
Points
realitycheck09 05/11/12 - 08:51 pm
0
1
@nothing2show4it - if the

@nothing2show4it - if the death penalty is such a great deterrent, why are the states with the highest murder rates death penalty states? Seems like it would be the other way around if your talking points weren't totally made up.

gregleopard
150
Points
gregleopard 05/11/12 - 08:55 pm
1
2
Addressing Flawed Logic

Now to address your positions, point by point:
1. The "sponging" (i.e. cost to the taxpayers) will be substantially greater if you give them the death penalty.
2. To suggest that "putting them to death is more humane (than allowing them to live)" doesn't even deserve a response.
3. Statistics overwhelmingly show that the death penalty does not deter crime.
4 and 5. You assert that: The "natural order of law" is to put them to death...so that they dont "promote the killings of others." Aren't you promoting the killing of others? What does your "natural order of law" say about that?
6. You could pull the trigger. But your examples suggest that the crime is about to be committed to you or your family. We are not talking about self defense. We are talking about a representative of the State killing someone long after the crime has been committed.

nothin2show4it
120
Points
nothin2show4it 05/11/12 - 09:04 pm
0
0
Your whole response isn't
Unpublished

Your whole response isn't worth the time. Your mind is made up AND you write like your reasoning is superior to all others. A typical Democrat response. Not saying you are one. I don't know but just pointing out the obvious.

I'm done. Anything else is a waste.

albertoli
191
Points
albertoli 05/11/12 - 09:07 pm
2
0
breathing the air of life,

breathing the air of life, and feeling the warmth of the sun, should be denied them as it was denied the victim

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