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Teen charged with obstruction, weapons violations

Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012 10:59 AM
Last updated 7:22 PM
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A teen was booked Tuesday morning on weapons charges after he walked away from a Richmond County sheriff’s deputy.

Tarrence Cameron Morgan  SPECIAL
SPECIAL
Tarrence Cameron Morgan


According to an incident report, the deputy noticed the young man standing on the corner of Massoit Drive and Massoit Court around 10 a.m. and stopped to ask why he wasn’t in school.

After the deputy got out of his vehicle, the teen, later identified as 17-year-old Tarrence Cameron Morgan, started walking in the opposite direction and refused to stop at the officer’s request.

Morgan then shoved the deputy who, in turn, tackled him to the ground, the report says.

After Morgan was taken into custody, the deputy found a .25-caliber pistol in the suspect’s pocket.

Morgan was booked into the Richmond County Jail on charges of possession of a pistol under 18 years old, possession of a concealed weapon and felony obstruction of a law enforcement officer.

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Asitisinaug
3
Points
Asitisinaug 01/25/12 - 12:18 pm
0
0
Great Job by a pro-active

Great Job by a pro-active Richmond County Deputy on patrol. This type of action by our law enforcement officers is exactly what helps to prevent criminals from committing crimes. An armed 17 year old walking around who is brazen enough to fight with the police is certainly not good for our community. This deputy may have saved a life today, maybe even the life of the young man he arrested.

Not is school getting an education, armed at 17 with a loaded handgun, keeping his hands in his pockets (had the deputy seen the weapon he would have been justified in shooting simply for failing to follow his instructions placing the deputy in harm’s way) and then the same community that this deputy is trying to protect and make better would turn on him and law enforcement in general. How about doing something now instead to make it known clearly to all young men that they need to be in school, they need not be armed illegally, they need to cooperate with the police and if treated badly should file a report later but cooperate at the time, etc.

This could have ended very badly in many different ways. I personally am very happy the deputy was not shot nor had to shoot this 17 year old man.

This young man is on a path to living in jail or prison for quite a while or ending up becoming another statistic by his death. Somehow, we as a community must reach our youth, hold them accountable for their actions earlier in life, set high expectations for them and ensure they get a good education. If not, then they certainly need to be held accountable by law enforcement and the court system as is now the case with this man.

fatboyhog
2082
Points
fatboyhog 01/25/12 - 12:19 pm
0
0
What do you want to bet that

What do you want to bet that mama will be upset that her precious little boy, who has "never been in trouble before" and is a "model citizen", was "beat down" by the mean Deputy, for no reason, of course. He was probably waiting on the school bus because he's a straight A student who cares about his education and was harassed for no good reason....same old story..

He's 17, with a gun, running away from, and fighting with the police. I can't say what the punishment for this misunderstood youth should be (because I don't want to violate the TOS), but let's just say that rabid animals are dealt with more appropriately.

showboat
365
Points
showboat 01/25/12 - 01:29 pm
0
0
where are this boy parents,
Unpublished

where are

this boy parents, with him hanging out of school?

Cameron Poe
1029
Points
Cameron Poe 01/25/12 - 01:45 pm
0
0
Couple of problems with this

Couple of problems with this situation:

1. The young man is 17 years old. Therefore, in the state of GA he is no required to be in school.

2. Was the search lawful? Because if not the officer put himself and the teen at risk just to have the case thrown out for not following procedure.

3. Who is to say the weapon was not for personal protection?

Sounds like there are many unknowns in this situation. While I will admit logic tells me the officer was doing the right thing at what cost does doing the right thing come at? There are reasons we have certain rules and rights. We as civilians must follow them but the officers are to follow them as well. Cleaning up the streets of Augusta is a number 1 priority but lets do it within the letter of the law so that the criminals stay in jail instead of being released on a technicality.

Again let me state I am not condoning the action of the offender and am in NO WAY condemning the brave officer. I am simply stating that there seems to be too many unknowns to suggest what has been childishly suggested in the above comments.

Little Lamb
47856
Points
Little Lamb 01/25/12 - 01:49 pm
0
0
Usually it is a bad idea to

Usually it is a bad idea to answer questions from a cop without a lawyer present, but it is always a bad idea to run from a cop or to refuse to stop when the officer yells, "Halt."

In this case, if the dude had merely answered, "I'm seventeen. I dropped out of school. My name is Tarrence Morgan. May I leave now?" — he could have avoided all those felony charges.

Cameron Poe
1029
Points
Cameron Poe 01/25/12 - 02:10 pm
0
0
I agree completely Little

I agree completely Little Lamb. But once again we must remember not all citizens are as educated in these matters as some of us are. Clearly you never run from an officer. And you never fight back. The offenders actions after the officer stopped gave way to the results. But if you allow me to play devil's advocate for a second...What kind of precedent are we setting by just stopping random young men on the streets? And let's all be honest the obstruction charge is a trash charge. It is too broad and used too many times as a way to another charge. It is like the tail light charge used for DUI's or drug checks. Again I am only playing devil's advocate here to try and open an honest discussion. And I for one would like to see our criminals put away the right way and not to get out on some technicality.

Riverman1
90141
Points
Riverman1 01/25/12 - 02:13 pm
0
0
Everyone here made good

Everyone here made good points, including Cameron Poe. The problem is our lack of community policing where a policeman is trusted and out among the people. In a situation like that he would see the young guy and say something in a friendly way like, "Why aren't you in school?"

The kid sees the officer all the time, trusts him and says, "I quit school."

The officer smiles and tells him, "You better get serious and make something of yourself."

They both go on their ways.

Little Lamb
47856
Points
Little Lamb 01/25/12 - 02:16 pm
0
0
I agree with you, also,

I agree with you, also, Cameron. The boy was probably exhibiting no suspicious behavior. But we citizens have told our policemen we want to see them on the beat, patrolling and engaging people to prevent crimes. We cannot send those messages and expect them not to do something every now and then.

SAPCS
35
Points
SAPCS 01/25/12 - 02:24 pm
0
0
Cameron Poe--The search was

Cameron Poe--The search was lawful once this "random young man" put his hands on a law enforcement officer. Regardless of the intended use of the weapon, it is illegal in the state of Georgia for a minor to be in possession of a firearm, to say nothing of the fact that he was carrying it concealed. Had he killed someone, people like you would have been the first ones screaming about the lack of action on the part of the RCSD. Keep up the good work, gentlemen.

raul
5500
Points
raul 01/25/12 - 02:41 pm
0
0
Is it 18 or 21 to be able to

Is it 18 or 21 to be able to have a gun?

Asitisinaug
3
Points
Asitisinaug 01/25/12 - 03:25 pm
0
0
1. The young man is 17 years

1. The young man is 17 years old. Therefore, in the state of GA he is not required to be in school. - Although not required to be in school, it is good pro-active COMMUNITY POLICING to stop, enquire and follow up. An officer who merely drives by is not being a pro-active community police officer such as this deputy who did a great job.

2. Was the search lawful? Because if not the officer put himself and the teen at risk just to have the case thrown out for not following procedure. - An officer may conduct a "terry search" for weapons for officer safety. However, in this case, the subject ran from and then fought with the police so he was searched after arrest and it is 100% legal. Funny how some of the same people criticized the deputy at Five Guys for not searching the subjects book bag earlier when a gun was in it.

3. Who is to say the weapon was not for personal protection? It is not legal for a 17 year old to possess a handgun. It is also not legal for anyone to possess an handgun in public concealed without a concealed weapons permit.

Additionally Cameron, the kind of precedent that is being set is that if you want to stop or deter burglaries, vandalism, thefts, drug use, etc. then you must stop and talk with individuals in those areas. All training in police academy teaches you this and it is a prime directive in all community oriented policing. You stop and talk with as many as you can, determine the law abiding from the non-law abiding citizens and deal with the situation as it arises. If all you want is cops in cars responding to calls for assistance they might as well sit at the police station waiting for crime to happen like firefighters - lets guess what that would do to the crime rate in any area. And, since we are being honest, the obstruction charge is a very legitimate and accurate charge in this case - subject refused to cooperate, refused to remove his hands from his pockets (where he had an illegal loaded handgun) and fought with an officer of the law. Any law abiding citizen should 100% fully support this charge and any other that could be added in order to restore law and order and respect for the men and women who are wearing the badge and having to deal with situations like this on a daily basis. If your wife were the police officer that this happened to and she was explaining it to you that night of how she had a close call today that could have resulted in her death while simply trying to do her job I can assure you that you would think differently.

River, you often make reference to community policing, and for good reason. I am 100% behind true community policing and will agree that CC has made a far better effort than RC. At the same time, when you have more than double the call volume per deputy, major budget cuts, etc. community policing in its true from cannot take place - you just don't have the resources. However, in this case, this deputy was riding his beat, speaking with people as he should and he came across a gun toting criminal who has ZERO respect for authority, including police officers. River, your story of the conversation between the two, etc. does sound nice and it would be great if that was the world we lived in. However, in this case if that is what had taken place and then this illegally armed criminal went on to rob & kill someone that day, how do you think you and others would be reacting to the actions of an officer who casually did his job, failed to act on instinct, failed to follow up on the conversation to see if the youth was telling the truth or lying, etc. as any good and hard-working dedicated officer should?

The deputy is lucky to be alive, did a great job and service for our community, is trying to do the right thing and deserves full support from all of us but especially someone who believes in community policing.

Just because they trust a police officer does not mean they will not kill him - case in point is the RCBOE police officer who caught one of his students in an area acting suspiciously and placed him in his car while he attempted to determine what was going on - that decision cost the police officer his life.

Look, there are some cops that do wrong, some that abuse their authority, etc. and you may review any of my past posts to know that I believe officers like that deserve immediate termination and depending on the circumstances, arrest. However, when you have a deputy who as in this case had obviously done a great job, isn’t lazy, follows up and follows through and has made a proper arrest and taken an illegally armed criminal off of the streets and you still have many who second guess and complain is just really baffles me. When cops do wrong they deserve punishment but when they do their job effectively they deserve our praise and support. This deputy did a GREAT JOB and a community service and deserves our praise.

Asitisinaug
3
Points
Asitisinaug 01/25/12 - 02:45 pm
0
0
Raul: Minors (persons under

Raul: Minors (persons under the age of 18) are NOT allowed by Georgia law to possess handguns. For further information on handgun as well as rifles and shotguns, you can visit: http://www.georgiapacking.org/law.php

Little Lamb
47856
Points
Little Lamb 01/25/12 - 02:50 pm
0
0
Uh-oh. Raul must be 19 and

Uh-oh. Raul must be 19 and packing.

Little Lamb
47856
Points
Little Lamb 01/25/12 - 02:53 pm
0
0
SAPCS wrote: . . . it is

SAPCS wrote:

. . . it is illegal in the state of Georgia for a minor to be in possession of a firearm. . . .

Please check this; I don't think it is correct. It may be illegal for a minor to be in possession of a handgun except in the presence of a responsible adult, but it certainly is not illegal for a minor to use shotguns and rifles alone.

Cameron Poe
1029
Points
Cameron Poe 01/25/12 - 03:04 pm
0
0
SACPS, People like me? What

SACPS,
People like me? What kind of person am I? Let's not make this a personal battle. If you take the time to read what I wrote I acknowledged that the young man acted irresponsibly. But I also acknowledged that the young man was doing nothing wrong by simply standing on the street corner. The point being made that clearly you missed was that being a young man on the corner is in no form or fashion probable cause or reasonable suspicion. So, to further clarify what I said, It is important that as a society when we detain, search, and/or arrest people we must make sure that we do so within the confines of the law. Yes once the suspect laid his hands on the officer the search became legal because at that point the suspect was committing a crime in plain view of the officer or in this case the victim. However, what led up to the suspect putting his hands on the officer may not have been by the book. So to summarize one more time...When we take criminals off the street we need to do so legally and by the book so that later he/she can not be acquitted and set free to commit more crimes. We must all follow the law SAPCS civilians and cops. And like I said before I am not condemning the officer for making our streets a safer place. I am simply pointing out that this situation can lead to a very slippery slope.

Asitisinaug
3
Points
Asitisinaug 01/25/12 - 03:06 pm
0
0
Little Lamb, Posession of

Little Lamb, Posession of handguns by minors: Minors (persons under the age of 18) are NOT allowed by Georgia law to possess handguns unless the following exceptions apply:

Attending a hunter education course or a firearms safety course.

Engaging in practice in the use of a firearm or target shooting

Engaging in an organized competition involving the use of a firearm or participating in or practicing for a performance by an organized group

Hunting or fishing pursuant to a valid license if such person has in his or her possession such a valid hunting or fishing license if required; is engaged in legal hunting or fishing; has permission of the owner of the land on which the activities are being conducted; and the pistol or revolver, whenever loaded, is carried only in an open and fully exposed manner (no concealing of the firearm)

Traveling to or from any activity described above, provided that firearm is carried in a unconcealed and unloaded fashion.

Any minor who is on real property under the control of such person's parent, legal guardian, or grandparent and who has the permission of such person's parent or legal guardian to possess a firearm.

Any minor who is at such person's residence and who, with the permission of such person's parent or legal guardian, possesses a pistol or revolver for the purpose of exercising the rights authorized in Code Section 16-3-21 or 16-3-23. (self defense laws, listed further down the page)

The exceptions DO NOT apply to any minor who has been convicted of a forcible felony or forcible misdemeanor, as defined in Code Section 16-1-3, or who has been adjudicated delinquent under the provisions of Article 1 of Chapter 11 of Title 15 for an offense which would constitute a forcible felony or forcible misdemeanor, as defined in Code Section 16-1-3, if such person were an adult.

GA law, even though prohibits minors from possessing handguns except as provided above, does not prohibit minors from possessing rifles and shotguns, unless they have been convicted of a felony or forcible misdemeanor.

Minors may not carry any weapon in a concealed manner.

Cameron Poe
1029
Points
Cameron Poe 01/25/12 - 03:14 pm
0
0
Asistinaug, I think you are

Asistinaug,
I think you are confused by what I am stating. I have clearly stated multiple times that I am not condemning the officer. In fact I am proud that RC police are doing there jobs and making our streets safer. I am also aware of the gun laws and that this suspect was breaking them. I too am aware that to be active the police must stop and talk with community members and check out all suspicious activity. LIKE I SAID I AM NOT CONDEMNING THE OFFICER FOR DOING HIS JOB. I am simply stating that standing on a corner does not make you a suspect or a criminal. Please re read my statement and realize that I support the charge and I support the officer. And as far as the obstruction charge is concerned I was speaking in generalities. Once again re read what I wrote instead of using my words to make some ridiculous tirade that does not even pertain to the message I was attempting to convey.
And for the record all good citizens should question their government. It is what creates an honest government.

david jennings
624
Points
david jennings 01/25/12 - 03:16 pm
0
0
I know this area well, and

I know this area well, and RCSD deputies are a welcome sight. The last few days I have noticed several traffiic stops on Old McDuffie Rd. So of Barton Chapel. This is much appreciated also. The speed limit is 25mph. and largely ignored. Keep up the good work LEOs.

Asitisinaug
3
Points
Asitisinaug 01/25/12 - 03:20 pm
0
0
Cameron, sorry but there is

Cameron, sorry but there is no slippery slope here.

You state that the young man wasn't doing anything wrong. However, in reality he was in fact carrying a concealed weapon. The deputy merely attempted to determine why he was on the corner during school hours (not only legally but his duty) and then re-acted to each circumstance as it arose resulting in the lawful arrest of a felon.

As for a young man being on a street corner not being probable cause or reasonable suspicion in any form or fashion, again you are incorrect. A community police officer or beat deputy who knows his beat knows far better of when to determine that someone is out of place or in a known drug area, etc. and therefore should (we as society expect him to) stop and talk with the person in order to determine if all is ok.

This person was never detained until he refused to remove his hands from his pockets (suspicious activity) AND until he ran from the officer (probable cause). He was not detained or searched prior to these activities taking place.

What led up to this situation was not only by the book but it is dead on. It is exactly what police officers are trained to do and how they are trained to do it. This officer was simply asking a young man a very valid question in an effort to determine what he was doing - community policing at is best.

So, to summarize one more time, this situation was 100% by the book and perfectly legal. Not only that, this occurred exactly the way we should want our police officers to be in our society instead of sitting around and waiting to take a report of a crime.

It is very important that we as a society hold our police accountable but at the same time appreciate their service and praise them when they do a job well. All of your questions have been properly addressed and further clarification (case laws) can be given as well. You can also "Google" community policing and/or The Broken Windows Theory as used by former Chief's in NYC and LA to greatly lower crimes within their areas and in all cases will see that this officer is being a good and pro-active police officer and is deserving of your praise. Questioning is fine but once you have the answers (and you do) then it is time to step up to the plate and acknowledge that this officer did a good job and removed a criminal from our society.

raul
5500
Points
raul 01/25/12 - 03:34 pm
0
0
@Asisitinaug. Thanks for the

@Asisitinaug. Thanks for the info.
@Little Lamb. LOL. No considerably older, but I do have a permit!

Cameron Poe
1029
Points
Cameron Poe 01/25/12 - 03:46 pm
0
0
Asiitisinaug, I have

Asiitisinaug,
I have acknowledged multiple times that the officer did the correct thing in getting the criminal off the street. I have no dog in this fight but clearly you do. So you must be an officer or a family member of an officer to take such offense to me asking such questions. If you read my first post I said I was only playing devil's advocate. I was opening up a discussion. A discussion that needs to be had in today's world. Of course it is a good thing to take criminals off the street. And of course I am supremely thankful to all of those in our community that put their lives on the line to protect and serve. I am familiar with the broken windows theory and I am also familiar with many of the criticisms of it. It is a theory and like all theories it is not 100% accurate. Once again I have also acknowledged all of the things the suspect did incorrectly or unlawfully. So once again I ask that you re read my posts before you go making outlandish assumptions. As for you suggestion to "Google" well I am sure I can "Google" and find any answer to fit what I want and it will certainly be accurate. Because we all know if it is on the internet then it has to be true. Right?
Now please READ what I have posted and realize that in no way have I supported the criminal and not the officer. Like I will say for the final time I was simply opening a discussion that while you may not like it is necessary. READ MY POSTS AND REALIZE THAT I HAVE PRAISED THE OFFICER MANY MANY MANY TIMES FOR DOING HIS JOB.

Asitisinaug
3
Points
Asitisinaug 01/25/12 - 04:07 pm
0
0
Cameron, I certainly do stand

Cameron, I certainly do stand up for police officers when they do right and I believe more citizens need to do so. I have read your comments and questions more than enough to understand what you were asking as well as what you are implying. My response is not only to you but to the many who don't understand the legalities, etc. especially in the questions you pose and the statements that you make. Your statements that it is a slippery slope for officers to questions individuals and that no probable cause or reasonable suspicion existed does go directly to this case and this officer - Those statements need good clarification because they are simply not correct. I have not nor will I attack you personally for your opinions and I agree that we should question our government. Clarification was also warranted in the fact that your question regarding if the gun was for personal protection is irrelevant because he cannot legally carry the weapon, much less conceal it.

I am glad to hear that you are praising the officer and that you believe he did as he should. If I misunderstood any of your questions or comments, I apologize.

Little Lamb
47856
Points
Little Lamb 01/25/12 - 05:08 pm
0
0
Retired Army wrote: I wonder

Retired Army wrote:

I wonder how many readers of the Chronicle took a look at the photo of the young man in question and thought one of two things after reading the article: A) A brother goes down for standin' around, or B) He really is kinda suspicious looking after all isn't he?

AutumnLeaves
9486
Points
AutumnLeaves 01/25/12 - 05:54 pm
0
0
It was Massoit Drive. We

It was Massoit Drive. We avoid that whole Area!

GaStang22
910
Points
GaStang22 01/25/12 - 06:45 pm
0
0
Cameron where you keep
Unpublished

Cameron where you keep hitting road block with people is you keep saying no cause!!! "I am simply stating that standing on a corner does not make you a suspect or a criminal." Yes it does if you are a child during school hours. At what age should a cop not question a child being in school...5, 10.... 13?? How do you know unless you ask?? Also, what about if you match a description of a BOLO for a robber? Can you just walk away and ignore the cops? Obstruction isnt a bogus charge, it is what it says, you are obstructing the officer from doing his job if he has cause to think you are doing something illegal and you do not give the information needed to satisfy you're not' breaking the law. There was cause if the officer sees a child on the street during school hours and said child can not just ignore him, that is obstruction. Had the guy said I'm 17 given name or ID and was respectful no harm no foul and would have been let go if he was legit. There is a law against children not being in school and the officer has a right to question it!! Do you honestly think that if a cop sees a guy at first friday who appears to be a teen walking with a beer, and the cops stops him to ask for ID he can just keep walking and ignore him? Or a kid smoking??? All these things are illegal for a minor to do and there is no problem with asking someone in public to show they're not breaking the law, no technicality will get them off of that. Yeah cause may be easier with a beer or cig in hand, but the child must prove they are of age.... I've had to do it many times....and if the child looks school age....cause again, not a guy on the corner.... A MINOR.

Riverman1
90141
Points
Riverman1 01/25/12 - 06:57 pm
0
0
Asitis and GaStang, yep, I

Asitis and GaStang, yep, I see what you mean. I read a book once about two rookie cops in NYC, nicknamed Batman and Robin. There was a movie made about them. What they had were street smarts and they would just randomly stop people who they had an idea were doing something wrong and they were uncannily right.

Their superiors hated them because they made everyone else look so bad with the number of arrests they made. One of them was punished and made to direct traffic for awhile. He started to pull over cars that looked funny to him and once again, he was successful.

They both became the youngest detectives in NYC history and received all kinds of accolades from the Mayor and media. But as time has gone on and I've thought about it. Why did the veteran cops not like these guys? Were they disruptive to the neighborhoods? When he was pulling over traffic as he stood in the street directing traffic was he missing the point of why he was there? Did the veteran cops have a better understanding of what law enforcment is really about?

allhans
24456
Points
allhans 01/25/12 - 10:53 pm
0
0
I hope his parent/s thanks

I hope his parent/s thanks the cop for his concern. A young man carrying a gun could possibly get in some big trouble.

Asitisinaug
3
Points
Asitisinaug 01/25/12 - 11:21 pm
0
0
Riverman, good points on both

Riverman, good points on both sides of the story there. Without knowing more, I really couldn't elaborate. I will however take a stab at it from s stereotypical point of view.

First, If they were merely stopping cars without probable cause, that is far different from approaching and questioning individuals on the street, etc. You must have probable cause to stop a vehicle unless you have a legitimate road check with signage and supervisory personnel. If they were in fact just making random stops with no reasonably articulable suspicion, no probable cause, etc. then the veteran officers were hopefully giving them good advice that it is always better to miss making a case than to make a case based on the wrong reasons.

On the other hand, it could be the same thing that happens in many places of business but especially in governmental organizations. New employees come in, work hard, make others look bad or lazy and are therefore criticized or ostracized for it. Also, often when police officers receive accolades and awards for some reason others are not happy for them because instead they feel (and sometimes rightfully so) that they work just as hard or have done just as much, etc. - It takes all kinds of officers to get the job done. You have those that are overly nice and extremely community oriented (often end up injured or killed for not being on guard at all times). You have the lazy ones that do the minimum to keep their job, stay out of trouble and basically ride their time until retirement. You have those that are well versed in the law, attempt to make positive changes in the community but also realize that to be successful you need to make cases and remove criminals from society. You also have the aggressive (usually younger) officers who are out to save the world any way possible - they are in it for the right reasons and truly believe that the more bad people they get off of the streets the better of the world will be. Each is right (except the lazy cop) in their own way.

What we need is for every officer to be well educated (a law degree would be nice), well trained and versed in officer safety, community oriented but good at separating law abiding productive members of society from the criminals, perceptive, excellent common sense, in great shape, hardworking, caring yet willing to hold anyone and everyone accountable for their actions under the law. Until we have Robo-Cops, or maybe change the salaries from under $30,000.00 per year to over $100,000.00 per year, I doubt we will achieve these goals.

Our society already has parents, teachers, social workers, counselors, and employers - cops are Law Enforcement Officers and their PRIMARY job is to enforce the laws of the US, State and Local jurisdictions in which they work. Although officers often wear many hats (most of the jobs listed above except employer), their primary purpose and directive is to enforce the laws and properly deal with those who violate it.

Asitisinaug
3
Points
Asitisinaug 01/25/12 - 11:22 pm
0
0
River, what was the name of

River, what was the name of the book or movie if you happen to remember?

JRC2024
9916
Points
JRC2024 01/25/12 - 11:45 pm
0
0
I support the officer.

I support the officer. Period.

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