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Victim testifies Dean touched her, exposed himself

DEAN DENIES ALLEGATIONS

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Former Harlem Mayor and Columbia County Commissioner Scott Dean, accused of molesting one of five adopted daughters, denied any kind of inappropriate kissing or touching after he took the stand Tuesday.

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Former Harlem Mayor and Columbia County Commissioner Scott Dean wipes away a tear as Judge Jim Blanchard dismisses the jury for the day. Dean is accused of molesting one of his five adopted daughters.  JIM BLAYLOCK/STAFF
JIM BLAYLOCK/STAFF
Former Harlem Mayor and Columbia County Commissioner Scott Dean wipes away a tear as Judge Jim Blanchard dismisses the jury for the day. Dean is accused of molesting one of his five adopted daughters.


His denial during his trial’s second day came after the girl testified that Dean crawled into her bed and touched her vaginal area.

Dean, who met the children at an orphanage in Guatemala in 2004 and 2005 before he and his wife adopted them in 2008, said cuddling in bed with the children, including the older girls, was normal.

“All the girls had adjustment issues,” Dean said, adding that he, sometimes his wife or their oldest daughter, Marlin, would curl up in bed with the others as comfort. “We would lie and a lot of times we would talk.”

The girl named as the victim, Dean said, had night terrors for months after arriving at their Harlem home.

“(I would) try and hold her,” he said. “Try and put my arms around her and hold her.”

On another occasion, the teen testified, Dean approached her in a bathroom, opened the towel he was wearing and told her he wanted to have sex.

Dean said that his daughter might have seen him run to the laundry room in a towel but that he never exposed himself to or made advances toward her.

The teen is now in counseling and testified that she has never denied the allegations against Dean.

At a pre-trial hearing Monday, Marlin said she had lied about such activity while she had run away to Mexico to garner sympathy and get money from her family.

The younger girl said Tuesday, however, that she told Marlin that Dean had touched her but left out details out of fear.

The girl also testified that Dean treated Marlin, now 18, “like she was his girlfriend or wife.”

Dean said Marlin has always been affectionate.

“She loves to hug,” he testified. “She loves to hold a hand. It reassures her because she’s still got confidence issues.”

In cross-examination, the younger girl admitted she didn’t get along with Dean’s wife, Renee, and wanted to run away with her sister. She stayed in the home after her sister ran away because Marlin said she’d have a better life here.

She also said she chose to live with foster parents after her initial interviews in October 2010 because she feared Dean would touch her again. But by then, Dean was already removed from the home by a court order and not allowed to return, said his attorney, Pete Theodocion.

On Monday, Superior Court Judge James G. Blanchard Jr. ruled that Assistant District Attorney Parks White could present evidence that Dean committed similar sex acts against other underage girls. West Virginia twin sisters testified that Dean, then 14, molested them when they were 12.

No charges were filed in those cases. Dean testified that it was his first sexual experience and that it was consensual.

The trial is expected to resume at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday.

Comments (46)

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my.voice
4205
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my.voice 12/13/11 - 05:02 pm
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“(The alleged victim) never

“(The alleged victim) never told Marlin Dean, never once, that anything inappropriate happened with Scott Dean.”

That's not much of a defense, children many times don't think they can trust the adults/siblings to protect them, and they just sit on it.

Chillen
16
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Chillen 12/13/11 - 04:24 pm
0
0

Sick......Gross......Wrong

Sick......Gross......Wrong

InChristLove
21972
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InChristLove 12/13/11 - 04:56 pm
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Could it be possible this

Could it be possible this child is making up this stuff in hopes that she can get out of this family (she's admitted to not getting along with her adopted mom) and wants to stay with her older sister who is of age to legally have custody of her or possibly she likes the foster home better and wished to stay there.

" present evidence that Dean allegedly committed similar sex acts against underage girls other than his daughters.

This is in no way in comparrison to what he is being accused of doing now. It occurred 30 years ago and he was 14 years old, the twins 2 years younger? How does this prove he likes young girl....the man was 14 years old at the time. If it had been a 5 year old girl I could see where they could compare the behavior.

Mr. Dean may very well be guilty, but Riverman1 you are a very vindictive person and if Mr. Dean is innocent and is found guilty because of any influence you might have by what you have written not only in this paper but others, I pray for your soul.

my.voice I believe they brought up the fact that the victim did not tell even her older sister that anything inappropriate occurred and they grew up in an abusive home and were extremely close.

Riverman1
70987
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Riverman1 12/13/11 - 07:26 pm
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ICL, what do you think I've

ICL, what do you think I've written in other papers? It's news to me.

Here is the thing about us expressing our opinions about the guilt or innocence of those on trial. Everyone does it. In effect, you are doing it, too.

The Chronicle did it when they ran a lead editorial defending one of their friends who is facing a federal lawsuit. They slammed the U.S. Attorney pretty hard even though I think the facts were pretty obvious. I suspect they let the defendant in that case write the editorial, but I can't say for sure.

When Robin Williams had his trial, someone in the media took up for him saying what he did wasn't criminal, but only him being a forceful lobbyist.

Thus, it's perfectly legitimate for the public and the various media to express their opinions.

Dixieman
10484
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Dixieman 12/13/11 - 07:27 pm
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0

Innocent until proven guilty,

Innocent until proven guilty, folks. Always bear that in mind.

Riverman1
70987
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Riverman1 12/13/11 - 07:39 pm
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See, I think jurors have

See, I think jurors have formed opinions about cases before trials. Most thinking people have read about cases in the news and if they haven't they live in Ludowici. I also bet when jurors are not sequestered, they read the news and comments. I hope so anyway.

KSL
106519
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KSL 12/13/11 - 07:50 pm
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Riverman, have you ever

Riverman, have you ever served on a jury in a criminal case? I have. It was a low profile case, so no, I didn't form an opinion prior to the trial as to guilt or innocence. And I can guarantee you that not one of us 12 jurors thought the guy was innocent after hearing the prosecutor's witnesses. But guess what, we found him innocent. The judge instructed us on the rule of law and that is what we had to do. We had no choice. None of us wanted to let him go, but by law, we had to. The judge convened us after the trial, told us we had done the right thing, but not to worry, he would be back in court and the next time, they would nail him.

Riverman1
70987
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Riverman1 12/13/11 - 07:55 pm
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Dixieman, the whole problem

Dixieman, the whole problem with that is no one believes it including law enforcement, the public and probably lots of defense attorneys. We believe some are guilty, some innocent and maybe we don't know about a few.

I like what Alan Dershowitz, the HARVARD law professor (yeah, I know some people close are Harvard Law grads) and trial lawyer said about it all. He said 99% of the defendants were guilty and the prosecutor, police, judge and defense all knew it. He said one prosecutor gave him a blank check if he ever believed a defendant was not guilty to come to him and he would drop the charges. He never went to the prosecutor.

His greater point was evidence was geared towards getting an outcome they all knew was right and the judges made it fit.

Do I think everyone accused of these type crimes is guilty? Nope. I'll tell you this, without going into detail, I'm very close to a lawyer who just successfully defended a man accused of such a crime and that's pretty rare once the DA has enough cause to proceed with the matter. He said the man was innocent and I believe him. So it is possible, even if I don't believe it in this case.

Riverman1
70987
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Riverman1 12/13/11 - 07:57 pm
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0

ICL said, "...I pray for your

ICL said, "...I pray for your soul."

ICL, I felt a cold chill when I read that and then I felt better. I'm not sure what it meant, but maybe it's that I'm right. It could be it was a feeling of relief and comfort of being on the Lord's side. I appreciate your kind words.

Riverman1
70987
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Riverman1 12/13/11 - 07:59 pm
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KSL, I've been in the jury

KSL, I've been in the jury pool for a murder trial and got kicked off by the defense attorney when I told him I'd read about the case and had formed an opinion. I was honest.

KSL
106519
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KSL 12/13/11 - 08:03 pm
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Good for you being honest. I

Good for you being honest. I had no opinion before the trial. But I had (we had) no doubt that this dude was guilty of the crime, but the law enforcement had made a bad error.

Riverman1
70987
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Riverman1 12/13/11 - 08:26 pm
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If I were an innocent

If I were an innocent defendant, I'd want the jurors to go home and read everything they could about the case.

Here is an ethical question, not a legal one. What if an attorney friend of Pete Theodocion, both officers of the courts, got on these very boards and made careful comments favorable to his case? Would that be ethical?

InChristLove
21972
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InChristLove 12/13/11 - 08:29 pm
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If you were innocent you

If you were innocent you would want jurors to go home and read all this negative comments and accusations against you to influence their thoughts. Personally, I would rather they judge me on the evidence presented or lack there of.

Ehtical, probably not. Hey, maybe you are a good friend of the Prosecutor and posting careful comments in favor to his case? Is that the game plan, Riverman1? Knew there had to be a reason you appear to be vindictive when truely I don't think you're such a bad guy.

KSL
106519
Points
KSL 12/13/11 - 08:33 pm
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Interesting question,

Interesting question, Riverman. I wish I could ask my dad, an attorney and expert in the law and the Constitution. He died on Christmas day in 2003.

What little I know about the case is what I have read in the comments section of the AC. As to his guilt or innocence, I have no opinion. I would be a perfect juror. But fortunately, I live in Aiken County.

I would never base my decision on what I read in a newspaper or heard reported on TV. The reporters just don't always get it right. Both my husband and I have been quoted in the newspaper in the past, complete with quotation marks, only to read the statements and know that it wasn't exactly what we said.

Riverman1
70987
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Riverman1 12/13/11 - 08:35 pm
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ICL, I don't think you are

ICL, I don't think you are such a bad lady either and I'm glad you asked if I'm friends with the prosecutor. I'm not friends with the prosecutor at all. If you have read my posts in the past, I've often been critical of Wright and the office. So I don't think any friends of the prosecutor are posting here. On the other hand, I'd bet on the other if it wasn't a sin to gamble.

Riverman1
70987
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Riverman1 12/13/11 - 08:38 pm
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KSL, yep, I can relate to a

KSL, yep, I can relate to a lawyer in the family. God bless your departed father. Not picking on you about your statement of being the perfect juror, but what it seems we need for the ideal jury in some people's minds is a bunch of Knownothings. Know what I mean?

grouse
1598
Points
grouse 12/13/11 - 10:03 pm
0
0

I hesitate to comment on this

Unpublished

I hesitate to comment on this until all the facts are in, but I'm troubled about digging up stuff that a 14-year-old allegedly did to those close to his age unless it really was criminal (e.g. aggressive, forceful, etc.), which it appears was not such no charges were filed. Many teens would be in big trouble if every inappropriate action they engaged in were brought to the fore...

grouse
1598
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grouse 12/13/11 - 10:06 pm
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and again, it's "lay" in her

Unpublished

and again, it's "lay" in her bed, not "laid."

mll
471
Points
mll 12/13/11 - 10:28 pm
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For those that were not in

For those that were not in the courtroom, and would like as Paul Harvey would say...the rest of the story.

The article says: "The teen is now in counseling and testified that she has never denied the allegations against Dean." What this article fails to show is that in later testimony, the victim was questioned by Theodocian again asking if the victim had EVER denied the allegations to anyone. The victim again said no. When the victim's younger sister was called to the stand, the sister contradicted the testimony of the victim, and said that yes the two sisters had in fact told two people that the allegations were false.

Additionally, when the expert witness testified as to the victim's comments regarding the 'towel incident' there was no mention of any invitation to have sex. In fact the victim told the expert witness that she was not sure that her father even knew she was in the room. So...either he knew she was in the room and asked her to have sex or he didn't know she was in the room. It can't be both ways.

As I sit in the courtroom, I keep waiting for what Riverman1 and Austin Rhodes say is coming....this huge piece of evidence that the prosecution has been keeping secret. Oh wait.....the Prosecution rested?? So where is this 'evidence' that they keep saying is just going to blow the case wide open?

Riverman1
70987
Points
Riverman1 12/13/11 - 10:44 pm
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Hey, MLL...Glad to see you

Hey, MLL...Glad to see you created this screenname to keep us informed about what's really happening in the courtroom. If you read my previous posts, in reference to Austin's suggestion that more damaging evidence would be produced, I said I thought there was already enough with what we knew.

shrimp for breakfast
5025
Points
shrimp for breakfast 12/13/11 - 10:55 pm
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0

One way out of jury duty is

One way out of jury duty is to tell the judge you would be a great juror because you can spot guilty people a mile away.

mll
471
Points
mll 12/13/11 - 10:56 pm
0
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Riverman1 I am happy to share

Riverman1 I am happy to share all the inter-court activity with you and anyone else. Especially since you can't be bothered to attend, even though this seems to be the most important event in your life.

seenitB4
73291
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seenitB4 12/14/11 - 07:06 am
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0

Could it be he was aroused

Could it be he was aroused lying in bed with teen girls....sorta reminds me of MJackson a little.....he slept with them he said....the coach in Penn. just showered with them he said....
I don't know if he is guilty or not & sometimes jurors don't get it right either...jmo

Brad Owens
3676
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Brad Owens 12/14/11 - 07:17 am
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Not sure about this one.

Not sure about this one.

Having lived in developing countries for over ten years I have found that folks will say just about anything to get to the U.S.

I am not saying they are not telling the truth, but I had a righthand man in Sierra Leone lie to me to get a visa to "visit" a relative in Maryland. Once he got to America, he never came back. I vouched for him at the embassy and so did some of the embassy staff that had know his the three years he worked for me there.

I had trusted this man with my life and he had never lied to me or not been 100% dependable.

All I am saying is that when it comes to green cards, visa issues and folks from developing countries coming to America, you have to always take that into account. And you also need to understand that people are willing to say or do anything to stay in the U.S. as well.

This would have allowed them to get out of the Dean household without having the residency issues being challenged, not that they would have or that they are not citizens, but that is something I would wonder about if I were investigating this.

I am just saying don't forget that these kids are not from America and they may have different ideas about what to dot o get what they want.

Also, Dean may be guilty of what they are saying; exposing himself, hugging and touching her. The question becomes, if he is sick like that, why is there only a couple of incidents in his house like this and one from 30 years ago when he himself was a minor, not even able to drive?

I don't know Dean, but I wonder how I would feel if these were false charges. Seems everyone has pretty much hung him. But then agian, what if the charges are true and he was exploiting his position of power over this girl.

Complicated and sad either way.

Brad

mll
471
Points
mll 12/14/11 - 08:38 am
0
0

Brad Owens: Your point about

Brad Owens: Your point about customs in foreign countries is a valid one. I would be interested to discover what if any differences in affection from the US and Mexico and Guatemala?

Riverman1
70987
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Riverman1 12/14/11 - 08:40 am
0
0

It appears the defense

It appears the defense strategy is attack the children.

mll
471
Points
mll 12/14/11 - 08:45 am
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Riverman: If one of the

Riverman: If one of the alleged victims has shown herself to have lied on the stand to the jury....how is that attacking the children?

mll
471
Points
mll 12/14/11 - 08:51 am
0
0

I think that the media has

I think that the media has been throwing crap on the walls for over a year, trying to get anything to stick. Heck, you have been throwing Soldier Boy against the wall for a year. Nothing like using a US Soldier for personal gain?

Little Lamb
40311
Points
Little Lamb 12/14/11 - 08:54 am
0
0

Defense attorneys are

Defense attorneys are obligated to attack anybody and anything that might help their client.

Riverman1
70987
Points
Riverman1 12/14/11 - 08:58 am
0
0

LL, throwing out the

LL, throwing out the authoritarian generalizations today?

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