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High-speed chase starts in Augusta, ends in Clearwater

Friday, Nov. 25, 2011 12:43 AM
Last updated 1:24 AM
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What started out as a check on a suspicious person turned into a police chase in two states that reached speeds of 80 mph shortly early Friday morning.

It ended after the suspect crashed his vehicle into a Richmond County sheriff’s deputy’s patrol cruiser.

Richmond County dispatch said a deputy tried to stop a car that was coming out of a closed business near Gordon Highway and Deans Bridge Road at 12:11 a.m. The driver instead fled onto Gordon Highway, and the deputy pursued.

The chase continued across the Savannah River into Aiken County. While the Richmond County deputy kept pursuing, North Augusta Public Safety and the Aiken County Sheriff’s Office were called in for help. The Richmond County deputy said he would keep up until South Carolina units could take over, according to Richmond County police radio broadcasts.

After following the vehicle on U.S. Highway 1, which is called Jefferson Davis Highway in that part of Aiken County, past Interstate 520 and onto South Carolina Highway 421, the Richmond County deputy lost sight of the vehicle. But a couple of minutes later, at 12:22 a.m., the deputy radioed in saying he had the suspect in custody and that the suspect’s car had crashed into the side of the deputy’s patrol cruiser, knocking off the mirror.

By then, units from North Augusta Public Safety and the Aiken County Sheriff’s Office had arrived for assistance. A North Augusta dispatcher said the chase ended on South Carolina 421 near Clearwater Elementary.

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Riverman1
78415
Points
Riverman1 11/25/11 - 07:00 am
0
0
The facts are high speed

The facts are high speed chases are inherently dangerous often resulting in injury to innocent bystanders or the officer.

curly123053
4083
Points
curly123053 11/25/11 - 08:12 am
0
0
I'm glad this thug was

I'm glad this thug was apprehended without loss of life. I'm also glad Richmond County pursued across the state line until Aiken County could get involved. Fleeing criminals sometimes see that state line as a safe haven expecting the officer to stop, regardless of which way they are fleeing.

Patty-P
3516
Points
Patty-P 11/25/11 - 08:22 am
0
0
Glad no one was hurt and that

Glad no one was hurt and that they caught the guy. No names?

YeCats
9802
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YeCats 11/25/11 - 10:19 am
0
0
Good job Officers!

Good job Officers!

sojumaster
19
Points
sojumaster 11/25/11 - 10:43 am
0
0
Riverman, And your point

Riverman, And your point being ?

allhans
22970
Points
allhans 11/25/11 - 10:52 am
0
0
Chases are dangerous but

Chases are dangerous but necessary. If the thugs knew there would be no chase, then they could all just drive off.

Riverman1
78415
Points
Riverman1 11/25/11 - 11:15 am
0
0
The facts simply don't hold

The facts simply don't hold that high speed chases are necessary. Most who run are not committing violent felonies is the truth of the matter. The vehicle should be pursued at safe speeds using radio and so on. As I said, almost half the pursuits will end in accidents where the officer or innocent bystanders are injured.

Many jurisdictions will not approve such a case unless there is good reason to believe a violent felony is taking place. The statistics show in jurisdictions that implement such policies the incidents of those who run does not increase, nor does crime.

The average person is not going to become a runner because he knows a jurisdiction does not allow high speed chases. Some of the biggest proponents of no high speed chases except with probable violent felonies are veteran police officers who have been injured in such chases.

allhans
22970
Points
allhans 11/25/11 - 11:31 am
0
0
Riverman. There are always

Riverman. There are always exceptions.

Riverman1
78415
Points
Riverman1 11/25/11 - 11:41 am
0
0
Allhans, absolutely, and I

Allhans, absolutely, and I generally don't like to get into debates with my conservative friends on this subject because it is emotional as is the actual high speed chase. Previously when we had these discussions I looked up the statistics and read numerous websites addressing studies of high speed chases and they are simply dangerous and unnecessary. Now that's not to say some aren't necessary.

Richmond County requires the supervisor to approve via radio any such chase. Was this done with this 80 mph pursuit through the downtown area into SC?

I almost said something similar about the ambulance that crashed with the Wells Fargo truck the other day. Again, statistics show if you are a patient in an ambulance the best thing for your medical care is for the ambulance to obey all traffic laws in route to the hospital. It just seems natural to speed to the hospital running stop lights and so on.

Vito45
-2
Points
Vito45 11/25/11 - 11:56 am
0
0
Riverman's stats have

Riverman's stats have certainly given me reason to soften my stance on chases, but I still can't see letting someone go scot free if you don't have tag number or some other way to follow up. In cities with aerial surveillance, I have NO problem with just tailing them from the air, then moving in when they get boxed in or stop.

sojumaster
19
Points
sojumaster 11/25/11 - 12:04 pm
0
0
Riverman, I would be curious

Riverman, I would be curious where you obtain your facts and figures. (In no way am I saying it is NOT dangerous, but life is not a bowl of cherries)

Besides the numbers that you state, image how difficult it is going to be to chase a runner, when they are going 80+ MPH, and your going to handcuff the police to 55? How are you going to use radios, when the perp is out of your sight within 30 seconds? Trust me, it takes more than 30 seconds to scramble a few cars to set up a net to trap a speeding car.

I would be interested in what jurisdictions actually will not approve a speed chase unles it is a violent felony? That is a rather broad grounds to allow a perp to speed away without persuit. If I am running because I have a suspended licence or an outstanding bench warrent, then a cop can not chase me in these areas? That is a bit crazy.

MAYBE the average person will not be a runner because the jurisdiction does not allow high speed pursuits but it is your average criminal that WILL now run knowing that. (I for one, do believe that more average Joes will be become a runner)

Edited for grammer clarification

Riverman1
78415
Points
Riverman1 11/25/11 - 12:14 pm
0
0
Sojumaster, I know this

Sojumaster, I know this sounds like a cop out, but I don't have the links handy and am working from memory. I just don't feel like looking it all up again, but I assure you I did previously. If you go back at the older stories about accidents and high speed chases, you will see many of the links and comments I posted. Orlando was the major jurisdiction that implemented the policy.

The facts are the incidents of perps running does not increase, nor does crime taking advantage of the policy. What does happen is the officers and the public are much safer. Doesn't the Richmond Cty policy call for the supervisor to approve any chase?

sojumaster
19
Points
sojumaster 11/25/11 - 01:09 pm
0
0
Riverman, I will have to ask

Riverman, I will have to ask some of my friends who are of the Richmond County's finest. So I will get back with you on that, I am not able to find their policies and procedures online. (I would hope they are NOT posted for public view). But under the assumption they have to, that is a good safe guard. It would allow the proper focus and allocation of resources to end the chase as quickly and safely as possible. I know that in LA, they will terminate a high-speed pursuit if they deem it too dangerous.

As for Orlando, you are right, as in a more restricted policy that is in place. I have not been able to find any study conducted after it was implemented in 1996 to show if the numbers actually go up or down. I do not know if perps are actually asked WHY they ran from the police after everything is done. (In fact all case study references that I was able to find were dated from the mid 90's and earlier, granted it was not an exhustive search)

I am still curious how you are going to conduct a pursuit with the police ONLY doing the speed limit and the perp has all the speed?

sojumaster
19
Points
sojumaster 11/25/11 - 01:13 pm
0
0
Riverman, BTW, I was going to

Riverman, BTW, I was going to look for these previously mentioned posts of yours, by when I looked at your profile and you had some 13,000+ posts. It is not going to happen, esp. since the brilliant minds that put the code together for this site decided that you should view ONLY 5 comments at a time, with no search function nor the ability to change the number of comments per a page.

Patty-P
3516
Points
Patty-P 11/25/11 - 02:17 pm
0
0
I'm for police chases if it

I'm for police chases if it is not a condensed area like shopping malls, etc. People usually run because they have done something wrong or have something to hide. The time of day (though this was the eve of Black Friday) is important. On a normal night not too many folks are out so it decreases the chance for accidents.

sojumaster
19
Points
sojumaster 11/25/11 - 02:29 pm
0
0
Patty-P .. I agree. That is

Patty-P .. I agree. That is why you should call in for permission first. Let someone who is outside of the situation, make a coolhead decision on further courses of action. I do not believe that a pursuit should be limited to only certain crimes. If you run, you're wrong. period.

Sweet son
9526
Points
Sweet son 11/25/11 - 02:57 pm
0
0
Well, it was 12:11AM.

Well, it was 12:11AM. Typically not a high traffic time and all South Carolinians obey all of the traffic laws especially the speed limit until they get on the Bobby Jones on the Georgia side. Then they do 70 like the rest of us Bad Georgians! Riverman you just like to scrap and it is OK!

Crime Reports and Rewards TV
33
Points
Crime Reports and Rewards TV 11/25/11 - 03:17 pm
0
0
With all the technology we

With all the technology we have now we should be able to send some sort of signal to traffic lights making them flash in some sort of sequence indicating a high speed chase is coming your way. Remember that sweet black lady with kids who was killed during one of Augusta’s recent high speed chases? I know cops need to chase criminals, but being cops they have the power to let the public know by flashing our traffic lights or setting off an alarm of some sort or putting it on all the radio stations or something otherwise another tax payer is going to die. Being tax payers are THE most endangered species of a time we have to do everything to save these rare endangered species or who’s gona pay the taxes? Less than 50% of every person you see is left paying any net taxes now and that number could have shrunk by 20-30 today. You never can tell when a runner will run into a fuel truck, or gas pump, or natural gas container, blowing it to kingdom come & taking only God knows how many poor soul’s with it in a mushroom cloud in the sky. The runner could have headed straight for the Law enforcement center turning his car into an explosive bomb and crashing it into the base of 401 Walton way, then what would we do with our entire jail burning cops to a crisp and setting off all the ordinance there? Other than that, good job Deputy you obviously herded the runner along in a fashion that did not cause any to die and for that we are very grateful.:o)

TCB22
596
Points
TCB22 11/25/11 - 03:19 pm
0
0
As usual, sweetsone expounds

As usual, sweetsone expounds hogwash. Riverman is exactly right! Listen to the man, folks. My child was out at that time last night for black Friday shopping. Is it worth YOUR child being killed because of a high speed chase? Not just no, but HECK NO!

sojumaster
19
Points
sojumaster 11/25/11 - 05:08 pm
0
0
@TCB22 I hate it when people

@TCB22 I hate it when people starting using that argument: "What if it was YOUR Kid/Parent/Loved One" You are taking a debate of ideas, and now just interjecting emotions into the debate.

You can use that line of debate for ANYTHING.

A kid got accidentally shot by the police because they happen to get caught in a cross fire. What if that was YOUR child, Time to get rid of guns for the police.

A child dies because they happen to be in the building that was targeted by a military operation. What if that was YOUR kid? .. Lets get rid of guns for the military.

An ambulance gets in a wreck and kills a child that was in the car it hit, That could have been YOUR child, so lets force ambulances to obey ALL traffic laws.

Your Kid is in an ambulance that had to obey all traffic laws and he dies because they couldn't get to the ER in time. What then?

That line can be used for ANYTHING and it accomplishes nothing but muddy up the waters for any reasonable intellectual debate.

You have to balance the risk with reward. You can not remove risk from life, you can only minimize it.

eagle
94
Points
eagle 11/25/11 - 05:37 pm
0
0
Kudos to all officers
Unpublished

Kudos to all officers involved. Thugs were caught, now let them do some hefty jail time...10-15 years should be good. Put them in one of those nifty neat orange jumpsuits and on the side of the road in a chain gang picking up trash.

TCB22
596
Points
TCB22 11/25/11 - 05:38 pm
0
0
If memory serves, a man was

If memory serves, a man was justifyably shot and killed by police because his vehicle was deemed "a deadly weapon." You can't play it both ways. Either it is or it isn't. You know cars flying willy nilly down the road at those speeds endangers the public and it is never worth it. It is the same as firing a gun into a crowd of people while aiming for a shoplifter. Grow up fellows. This ain't the wild, wild west.

Vito45
-2
Points
Vito45 11/25/11 - 06:20 pm
0
0
Well stated sojumaster. It is

Well stated sojumaster. It is the same with using "well, not all" as an argument when you've made a general statement. Drives me nuts.

sojumaster
19
Points
sojumaster 11/25/11 - 07:36 pm
0
0
TCB22, Yes a vehicle can be

TCB22, Yes a vehicle can be considered a deadly weapon. That is why when the perp decides to hit (or attempts to hit) a Police Officer (or a civilian) they are charged with attempted murder or manslaughter. Also that is why you have criminal charges of vehicular manslaughter available. Just simply fleeing from the Police will land you extra time in jail. So to claim that vehicles can be used as deadly weapons is a decent argument but you the use of a kitchen knife should be outlawed also. There is a good handful of murders that are committed with a kitchen knife. While I know that such an statement can bring ridicule, but it demonstrates that there is a lot of everyday items that can be clearly deadly.

(you did discount your point when you start mentioning shooting a gun at a shoplifter, I am VERY hard-pressed to believe that such an incident occurred on face value, which if such an incident occurred I do imagine the police officer is serving many years in jail)

Yes, high-speed pursuits are DANGEROUS. I am not naive to that fact. It is just one of those risks we have to balance for the good order and justice of our society.

kiwiinamerica
922
Points
kiwiinamerica 11/25/11 - 07:51 pm
0
0
There is an interesting
Unpublished

There is an interesting discussion of the pros and cons of police pursuits HERE on the FBI's website. The article references a number of studies which have been done on this issue.

Salient stat: 1% of high speed pursuits result in a fatality.

GaStang22
910
Points
GaStang22 11/26/11 - 01:59 am
0
0
"If memory serves, a man was
Unpublished

"If memory serves, a man was justifyably shot and killed by police because his vehicle was deemed "a deadly weapon." You can't play it both ways. Either it is or it isn't."
sojumaster, answered that one pretty good. Yes it can be both, if said deadly weapon is used as one, but when it is not used as one but used properly is a different story. It can be both ways. Ex" Kitchen knife, baseball bat, fist, etc...

And you know TCB22, the officer and the other innocent people killed by the guy that the officers called the pursuit off of because they didn't know the guy had just killed a few people were someones Son, Dad, Mom, etc... What if that person was yours? You would be mad they didn't chase and stop him. What if the kidnapped kid in the trunk of the guys car they did not chase was yours?

It does go both ways. As sojumaster said, yes they are dangerous and we have to trust the police with a potentially life changing deadly call to when it is worth it or not, and for these pressures and risks to their lives we pay them chicken scratch. Sometimes it takes a life sometimes it saves one. Put the anger where it should be, our bleeding heart justice system these ignorant people have created that allow so many KNOWN dangerous criminals to walk the streets among us due to over crowding, lack of funding, legal loopholes and lack of common sense to see the number of criminals actually rehabilitated does not justify the 20th chance rule and the total lack of deterrence.

Patty-P
3516
Points
Patty-P 11/26/11 - 02:13 am
0
0
gastang....agreed on your

gastang....agreed on your last comment. The system works for criminals but doesn't work for victims and future victims.

Riverman1
78415
Points
Riverman1 11/26/11 - 02:42 am
0
0
You guys know I can bring it

You guys know I can bring it with the comments if I choose, but I believe we are all on the same page here with not wanting bad guys to run. I don't want to slam officers for doing the job the way they've been told. We simply differ in our belief whether it is right to chase runners at high speeds unless we have reason to believe a violent felony has been committed.

The statistics simply say most runners are scared and stupid young people who have not committed serious crimes. They also say the chase has an almost 50% possibility of ending in an accident with innocent people injured. I'd be all for increasing the penalties for runners, by the way. Also, police policies on such matters are public record.

TCB22
596
Points
TCB22 11/26/11 - 07:11 pm
0
0
You will never justify that

You will never justify that the benefits outweigh the risks in high speed chases to me. Adrenaline rushes are temporary. Death is forever.

Vito45
-2
Points
Vito45 11/26/11 - 07:46 pm
0
0
River, that is what I (f.k.a.

River, that is what I (f.k.a. Iceman), said when we debated on the forums; make the penalty for running too painful for "scared and stupid young people who have not committed serious crimes" to do it. Something like mandatory jail time of 2-5 yrs should get their attention. With that, when someone DOES run, it is a safe assumption they have a reason for fleeing and they need to be caught.

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