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Teen accused in Grovetown home invasion held in Juvenile Court

Thursday, Nov. 10, 2011 5:26 PM
Last updated 7:49 PM
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Prosecutors withdrew a motion to transfer one of four teens charged in an October home invasion from Juvenile to Superior Court at an adjudication hearing Thursday.



Assistant District Attorney Madonna Little said she withdrew the motion to transfer Antonio Marquette Davis, 15, after receiving results of a mental evaluation. Little said it showed Davis as borderline mentally retarded.

Davis and four others are accused of an armed home invasion in Grovetown on Oct. 30.

The incident occurred just before 2 p.m. on Oct. 30 in the Lake Royal subdivision off Old Belair Road. A woman called authorities and said a group of young men threatened her at gunpoint.

Nicholas Dwight Blodgett, 17, of Magnolia Parkway in Grovetown, and Mario Lavache Jones Jr., 17; Jermaine Marcell Jones Jr., 14; Zion Howard, 11; and Davis, 15, all of Augusta, are charged with burglary, kidnapping, attempt to commit and possession of a firearm during the commission of a crime.

At the hearing, Davis and Jermaine Jones submitted admissions to the charges and will be sentenced once all investigations and mental evaluations are complete, Columbia County Juvenile Court Judge Doug Flanagan said.

The woman said she was in the kitchen of her boyfriend’s Lake Royal Drive home, where she saw someone approach the front door.

Davis said at the hearing that Blodgett picked them up from Murphy’s Crossing in his truck, brought them to Columbia County to “do a lick.” Davis said Blodgett showed them the house to rob “because they had some guns.”

Blodgett told them to ring the doorbell and put the gun in the face of whoever answered the door, Davis said.

“Nick gave us the guns to do it,” Davis said, adding that Blodgett also told the young men to shoot the homeowner in the leg if he tries anything.

The woman told deputies that she ran to answer the doorbell so it wouldn’t wake up her boyfriend sleeping upstairs. When she opened the door, Davis said he asked if “Bill” was home. When she said no, another teen hiding to the side of the door put a gun in her face, backed her up into the house and made her lay face-down.

When the assailants demanded to know who was home, she warned them not to wake up her boyfriend upstairs.

“He came out with a pump,” Davis said. “He cocked it, so we ran.”

Davis said Blodgett told them to run through the woods to another neighborhood, where he’d be waiting. Deputies saw four young men running and a blue Ford F-150 truck driving slowly in the area.

Davis, Jermaine and Mario Jones, and Howard were arrested a short time later. Once authorities realized Blodgett’s involvement, he was charged early the next morning.

Blodgett is being held in the Columbia County Detention Center on a $90,200 bond, according to jail records. Mario Jones also is in the jail on an $85,300 bond.

Davis, Jermaine Jones and Howard are being held without bond in the Regional Youth Detention Center.

Comments (20) Add comment
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Patty-P
3516
Points
Patty-P 11/10/11 - 06:24 pm
0
0
I'm surprised the three are

I'm surprised the three are still being held in the RYDC.

Taylor B
5
Points
Taylor B 11/10/11 - 09:58 pm
0
0
Lucky kids. Really lucky.

Lucky kids. Really lucky.

macktaylor
29
Points
macktaylor 11/10/11 - 11:09 pm
0
0
I've just been wondering if

I've just been wondering if they were trying to rob the drug house and ended up at the wrong place. This is the type of thing we usually see where drugs or drug money are involved.

Craig Spinks
817
Points
Craig Spinks 11/11/11 - 12:50 am
0
0
"Border-line retarded?"

"Border-line retarded?" Davis, Ms. Little or "Elmer Fudd?"

Who conducted the psychological evaluation? One of the court employees?

Patty-P
3516
Points
Patty-P 11/11/11 - 07:58 am
0
0
Craig, if you look at the

Craig, if you look at the news report on WRDW News12, Davis doesn't appear to be borderline retarded at all to me.

belle
309
Points
belle 11/11/11 - 09:21 am
0
0
mack, they knew exactly what
Unpublished

mack, they knew exactly what house they were going to. From the events of that day I am certain this was not a robbery as much as a set up of the 4 Richmond County boys for the entertainment of others and the injuries to the homeowners would be bonus.

kiwiinamerica
961
Points
kiwiinamerica 11/11/11 - 03:11 pm
0
0
Guaranteed to be heard during
Unpublished

Guaranteed to be heard during the trial:

"Way-ell............mah borh is a guurrd borh...............he jus' gaht hisself inta bay-ed kurm-paneh................."

Craig Spinks
817
Points
Craig Spinks 11/11/11 - 04:23 pm
0
0
Patty-P, I have two graduate

Patty-P,

I have two graduate degrees in Mental Retardation and over a quarter century working with the intellectually disabled in various schools. Most folks like this kid don't act retarded to me, either.

But what do I know when compared with the "knowledge" of Fudd's court-appointed "experts" who "see" MR without evidence of adaptive problems in kids', pre-crime, everyday lives?

Patty-P
3516
Points
Patty-P 11/12/11 - 01:08 pm
0
0
Well Craig I certainly am not

Well Craig I certainly am not an expert on mental retardation. My observation, however, is that this teen is able to answer (in detail) a series of events of which he participated. He was able to carry through with instructions given to him (by Blodgett) without difficulty. The very fact that someone felt he was able to fully understand and answer questions asked to him while he is on the stand means something to me as well.

His age (maturity) in making sound decisions I would think is a factor, but not an excuse. I would like to know who performed the test that determined he was borderline mentally retarded.

Willow Bailey
20603
Points
Willow Bailey 11/12/11 - 10:51 pm
0
0
Patty-P apparently Craig is

Patty-P apparently Craig is the expert; but I will say (imho) that from some of my experiences in the classroom and through mentoring others, border line mental retardation would not be recognizable without observing and interacting with the person in regards to their ability to make decisions and process the results of those decisions; or either by viewing the explanations of their psychological testing scores.

Most do seem normal, until you realize they have difficulty processing the consequences of their actions particularly when under the influence of peers. With that said, the boy does need some special consideration, but still should see some consequences followed by counselling, a program to give him direction and lots of follow up.

The poor fellow just doesn't GET IT. Sadly, I don't think that a lot of that help will happen for him.

Patty-P
3516
Points
Patty-P 11/13/11 - 02:50 am
0
0
You are right Willow.

You are right Willow. Unfortunately then, it sounds almost like 99% of 'feral' youth (as Craig would put it) are either fully or borderline mentally retarded. Many of them are committing these acts of violence with what seems like difficulty processing the consequences of their actions, and it seems to be getting worse by the year (youth getting younger and younger). Must be something in the water around here. :)

Craig Spinks
817
Points
Craig Spinks 11/13/11 - 03:12 am
0
0
WB. He will never "get it"

WB.

He will never "get it" that he is responsible for his actions unless he is held liable for them.

He is the product of domestic and school situations wherein mothers, fathers, teachers and principals are phobic that their disciplinary actions will take the, not the feral child invading homes, off the streets.

Those too effete and pusillanimous to establish and enforce strong policies backing assertive parenting and schooling need to go. And it's going to be up to Us, the People, to "go" them.

Craig Spinks
817
Points
Craig Spinks 11/13/11 - 03:13 am
0
0
OOPS: Line 4- not "the" but

OOPS: Line 4- not "the" but "them."

Willow Bailey
20603
Points
Willow Bailey 11/13/11 - 08:56 am
0
0
Where shall we "go them to",

Where shall we "go them to", Craig?

We are talking about the DA's decision not to take Davis out of the court's juvenile division. All of the boys did not have the same results from their psychological evaluations; only one boy in the group did. Should that be ignored?

Craig, I do GET IT. Have always gotten it... and remember getting it from the get go. I also understand about boundaries, responsibilities and consequences. Don't think I said the boy did not need consequences; in fact, I said he did need them. He probably needs them worse than some others, because of his lack of ability to process the end results. The question would be, what should those consequences be and how can he be helped. He's only 15, not time to give up on him yet.

I am sure you know, some learn by wise counsel, others through experience/consequences and some never learn at all. He needs a chance to see where he fits in

I agree there is a disciplinary problem in the entire country. I am not an expert, like you, but I do have personal experience with groups containing various ages, social, educational, financial and familial backgrounds. I've seen people grow, change and overcome their circumstances and unwise decisions. It isn't impossible. Which is the better choice, work with people or build more prisons?

The fact that our educational facilities and dysfunctional homes are out of control, doesn't change the fact that there is a difference between the undisciplined and the mentally challenged undisciplined. I have no statistics, but I would say we have more students today, who fit into a mentally ill diagnosis. Education is in need of reform to include learning the real questions. They are too busy trying to come up with answers without the questions. We could talk all day about why our society is out of control.

I think you've said you are retired, have you considered putting your wisdom and experience to work within small groups to teach and mentor? I think you would be awesome and it would make a difference. The trouble we have is wanting to do it ALL or do nothing. Lives are changed .... ONE AT A TIME, by those who are willing to do small things.

Willow Bailey
20603
Points
Willow Bailey 11/13/11 - 09:00 am
0
0
Can't get a post to work.

Can't get a post to work. Try it in small segements.

Willow Bailey
20603
Points
Willow Bailey 11/13/11 - 09:01 am
0
0
Where shall "we go THEM to",

Where shall "we go THEM to", Craig?

We are talking about the DA's decision not to take Davis out of the court's juvenile division. All of the boys did not have the same results from their psychological evaluations; only one boy in the group did. Should that be ignored?

Willow Bailey
20603
Points
Willow Bailey 11/13/11 - 09:04 am
0
0
Craig, I do GET IT. Have

Craig, I do GET IT. Have always gotten it... and remember getting it from the get go. I also understand about boundaries, responsibilities and consequences. Don't think I said the boy did not need consequences; in fact, I said he did need them. He probably needs them worse than some others, because of his lack of ability to process the end results. The question would be, what should those consequences be and how can he be helped? He's only 15, not time to give up on him yet.

I am sure you know, some learn by wise counsel, others through experience/consequences and some never learn at all. He needs a chance to see where he fits in

Willow Bailey
20603
Points
Willow Bailey 11/13/11 - 09:02 am
0
0
I agree there is a

I agree there is a disciplinary problem in the entire country. I am not an expert, like you, but I do have personal experience with groups containing various ages, social, educational, financial and familial backgrounds. I've seen people grow, change and overcome their circumstances and unwise decisions. It isn't impossible. Which is the better choice, work with people or build more prisons?

Willow Bailey
20603
Points
Willow Bailey 11/13/11 - 09:03 am
0
0
The fact that our educational

The fact that our educational facilities and dysfunctional homes are out of control, doesn't change the fact that there is a difference between the undisciplined and the mentally challenged undisciplined. I have no statistics, but I would say we have more students today, who fit into a mentally ill diagnosis. Education is in need of reform to include learning the real questions. They are too busy trying to come up with answers without the questions. We could talk all day about why our society is out of control.

Willow Bailey
20603
Points
Willow Bailey 11/13/11 - 09:03 am
0
0
I think you've said you are

I think you've said you are retired, have you considered putting your wisdom and experience to work within small groups to teach and mentor? I think you would be awesome and it would make a difference. The trouble we have is wanting to do it ALL or do nothing. Lives are changed .... ONE AT A TIME, by those who are willing to do small things.

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