Police seek leads in community after latest homicide

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A common fear returned for some River Glen apartments residents when they once again looked out their windows Tuesday afternoon to see blue lights.

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Neighborhood residents watch as deputies hand out fliers in an attempt to find a lead in the killing of Angelo Quinn Daggett. The man was shot to death at River Glen apartments early Saturday.   Rainier Ehrhardt/Staff
Rainier Ehrhardt/Staff
Neighborhood residents watch as deputies hand out fliers in an attempt to find a lead in the killing of Angelo Quinn Daggett. The man was shot to death at River Glen apartments early Saturday.

Just three days earlier, Keisha Thomas, a mother of two, had jumped from her bed and hit the floor when shots rang out through the neighborhood.

Officers arrived shortly before 12:30 a.m. Saturday and found the body of 23-year-old Angelo Quinn Daggett behind Building Y at the complex at 201 E. Telfair St.

On Tuesday, authorities returned to the area to pass out fliers and talk with residents. A helicopter flew overhead.

"Before (the case) starts going dry and getting cold, we come out to keep people amped up," said Richmond County sheriff's Capt. Scott Peebles. "We don't want people forgetting. We want them to know we're serious."

It's a tactic the sheriff's office has employed before. Within hours after using the same practice for a past investigation at East Augusta Commons, deputies had a suspect in custody.

"We've definitely had our fair share of issues down here," Peebles said as he stood on the sidewalk beside River Glen.

He estimated officers are called to the complex almost daily.

"Our kids need to be safe," said Pamela Scott. "We can't keep our kids locked up. It's about time they stop this."

Mesha Jessie held her hand to her stomach as police roamed her neighborhood. At six months pregnant, she wishes she could move to a safer area.

"They won't transfer us," she said.

Directly across the street from the scene of the killing, young children played on a slide and swing set after just being dropped off from school.

Residents said children can often be seen playing until the early-morning hours. Their concern is that one day, the stray bullets could strike their child.

"(My children) don't play outside. Not here," said a woman who referred to herself as Ms. Lee. She and her children, from newborn to 3 years, live just one building away from the homicide scene.

Daggett did not live at the complex, Peebles said. He had been staying at a west Augusta apartment complex after his recent release from prison.

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wondersnevercease
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wondersnevercease 05/18/11 - 07:05 am
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"Mesha Jessie held her hand
Unpublished

"Mesha Jessie held her hand to her stomach as police roamed her neighborhood. At six months pregnant, she wishes she could move to a safer area."

"They won't transfer us," she said.....

Who won't transfer you?...Are you not free to leave?

dani
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dani 05/18/11 - 12:55 pm
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Is there anyway to find out

Is there anyway to find out why someone needs a transfer to move?
I have never heard of such a thing.
This is a free country, if you have another place to go, why would "they" stop you.

dani
12
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dani 05/18/11 - 12:58 pm
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"They" would have to chain me

"They" would have to chain me to prevent me leaving. If nothing else, maybe I could find some space under the bridge.

Ms.LadyR
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Ms.LadyR 05/18/11 - 03:18 pm
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Please don’t judge these

Please don’t judge these women in this article. We do not know what their situation is. If they cannot afford to move somewhere else or if there is nowhere else they can go that does not mean we have the right to talk about these women. If you have not had to deal with the system and trying to get assistance it is very hard trying to keep living. I can say that I am, a single mother with one child. It is hard. I made a mistake and I have to deal with it. I get assistance and I don’t have a problem letting anyone know. But lucky I have family that is willing to help. We don’t know if these women have the same advantage as others. Plus, it’s not only the police to prevent crime it is the community. If we can all pull together as a community and work together and not judge, some problems could be resolved.

wondersnevercease
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wondersnevercease 05/18/11 - 06:06 pm
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I am not judging this
Unpublished

I am not judging this woman...I simply want to know who "they" are and why "they" are preventing her from moving...is she enslaved by someone?

Patty-P
3516
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Patty-P 05/18/11 - 08:23 pm
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@wonders...it may have

@wonders...it may have something to due with the assistance she is receiving. "They" could mean the Housing Authority.

Suzy Q
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Suzy Q 05/19/11 - 01:06 am
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If you put yourself in the

If you put yourself in the position of having to receive assistance (pregnant and unable to support yourself or your offspring) then you may wind up in a less-than desirable place to live.
Public assistance provides shelter, food and medical care, not a house with a white picket fence in the suburbs.
There are plenty of people who work two or more jobs just to make ends meet and are barely scraping by in neighborhoods that are not so nice, but they are paying taxes to make that public housing available.

If you are receiving said public assistance, you have no right to expect a higher standard of living than the taxpayers who are supporting you.

Brad Owens
4396
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Brad Owens 05/19/11 - 03:25 am
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Try waterboarding to get some

Try waterboarding to get some answers on 'who done it'

Forethought
15
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Forethought 05/19/11 - 12:31 pm
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If you never stayed in this

If you never stayed in this type of area or lived this life you are not really qualified to comment on the thoughts of a person as such in this article. It is more deep than what you think. I would encourage you to read a book called Freakonomics. Consider the chapter dealing with the college grad who did his thesis statement/paper on why do drug dealers still live with their mothers. And also why gangs attract young members. By the way he was not black or hispanic and he actually moved into the southside chicago area for his research and was accepted by the local gang to write his paper. Hard working citizens cannot understand the logic of folk that seem to not work as hard as they do. Most of them figure that if you are not on their level that means you are not trying and waiting on a hand out.

Suzy Q
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Suzy Q 05/19/11 - 09:31 pm
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Forethought...who said that

Forethought...who said that everyone struggling to get by is waiting on a handout? There are plenty of people out there working two or three low-paying jobs to make ends meet who wouldn't think of accepting a handout. THEY are being taxed to death (along with anyone drawing a regular paycheck) to support people who WILL NOT WORK.
I didn't read Freakonomics, but I'm willing to guess that a drug dealer still lives with his mother because selling crack cocaine isn't a taxable income. He can't show proof of employment and his credit score is non-existent so he can't pass the criteria for renting or buying his own place, even with a pocket full of ill-gotten cash.
What, exactly, is the 'logic' of folks that seem to not work as hard as others to make their own way? Even a low-paying menial job (or several) brings no shame to the one working it when they are making HONEST money.
There is a sense of pride and accomplishment that comes with knowing you are providing for your family, even if you aren't living high on the hog, that no amount of ill-gotten money can give you.

hotgeorgiapeach28
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hotgeorgiapeach28 05/20/11 - 01:01 am
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First thing first for the

First thing first for the woman whose six months pregnant, I believe what she means is that there are no other avalible section 8 housing locations in Augusta,GA that people at riverglen fall under by specific qualification. Which means this is a last resort, despite the freedoms of speech you hold so dearly to your own available options in living standards, being able to move is a luxuary for those who can afford it or for those who live in cities with more than one section 8 housing location.
Secondly, to move with or without proper 30day "written" notice to RG Manangment, if your 12month Housing Authority contract is not up you will lose your benifits for 2 years and posibly any other Gov Benifits along with it for breaking contract, simply by moving before your 12month Housing assistace contract is up, and will not be eligable for Government assistance for a 24month peroid by Law and may exlude you permenantly from the Augusta Housing Authority wait list in the future.

Also, again, Brad, this is not the middle east, you can't just go around water boarding American Citizens.

TO:suzie Q, not everyone in low income housing refuses to work, many are elderly and disabled also, some are victims of domestic abuse or other violent crimes and have no support or childcare options. and some have served honorably for the US Military..big surprise i know right, think before you speak, you should be ashamed of yourself to think that all low income housed individuals look alike, thats almost discrimination. that would be like me saying if you live on the other side of the Augusta River walk your either a corrupt mayor or a senators son. 2 wrongs don't make a right, and just because people can only afford to live in cheap areas doesn't mean they are animals like the drug dealers everyone hears about in the local paper, feel free to do your homework before you make accusations toward less fortunate individuals Suzi Q, you might learn somthing!

Forethought
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Forethought 05/20/11 - 08:53 am
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Suzy Q, either you

Suzy Q, either you missunderstood what i was trying to say or I should reword my statement. What i am saying is that you have people in society looking into the projects and assuming that people there are not trying because they don't have the same material possessions as others and therefore society usually automatically assumed that they are waiting on a handout! Nobody is doubting what you are saying because you are correct, a legal paying job does bring a sense of pride and respect to the job holder. Your assumption about Freakonomics is also wrong. If you have the chance glance thorough the book it is truly an eye opener for anyone who knows nothing about that life style. It makes for good reading.

Suzy Q
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Suzy Q 05/20/11 - 09:43 am
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@hotgeorgiapeach28..."you

@hotgeorgiapeach28..."you should be ashamed of yourself to think that all low income housed individuals look alike, thats almost discrimination."

You claim to know what I think? You must, as I said nothing to support your ridiculous claim.

Instead of telling others to 'think before you speak', perhaps you should work on your reading comprehension skills.

Suzy Q
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Suzy Q 05/20/11 - 09:58 am
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@Forethought....I may have

@Forethought....I may have misunderstood your initial post, and I agree that there are people who will make an assumption based on where someone lives without considering any extenuating circumstances regarding the individuals.
I don't doubt that there are some people who desperately want out of that situation, and are taking the steps to get themselves out. I also don't doubt that there are some who are content to stay in that situation, but my intent wasn't to paint everyone on public assistance with a broad brush.

Regarding Freakonomics, I actually have Super Freakonomics (haven't had a chance to read through it yet), so maybe I'll have to pick up a copy of Freakonomics as well. Thanks for the info on a good read :)

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