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Man must serve 20 years for burning his daughter

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An Augusta man will spend the next two decades in prison without the possibility for parole after pleading guilty in Superior Court on Monday to setting his daughter on fire.

Jammie Maurice West was sentenced Monday after pleading guilty to setting his daughter on fire during an argument.   Special
Special
Jammie Maurice West was sentenced Monday after pleading guilty to setting his daughter on fire during an argument.


With his daughter, Bianca West, 20, present in the courtroom, Jammie Maurice West, 39, pleaded guilty to two counts of aggravated assault. Judge Carl C. Brown sentenced him under the recidivist statute, meaning West will not be eligible for parole and the parole on his old charges is revoked, said Richmond County District Attorney Ashley Wright.

West was arguing with the victim's mother on May 9 in the front yard of her Blum Street home when his daughter and her boyfriend stepped in to try to quell the fight. West poured a flammable liquid from a beer bottle onto his daughter and ignited it with a lighter. The girl's mother snuffed out the fire with her robe.

For a time, Bianca West was in critical condition at the Joseph M. Still Burn Center. She suffered second- and third-degree burns to her face, arms and chest. Today, she has some scarring and suffers pain, Wright said. She continues to be monitored by doctors.

"She is in amazingly good condition," Wright wrote in an e-mail. "If you saw the pictures from the hospital, you would wonder if she would ever heal. She also has an amazing attitude and spirit, both of which have helped her survive this ordeal."

West had been paroled in August 2009 after serving 16 years of a 55-year sentence for voluntary manslaughter and possession of cocaine and was living with his daughter and her mother.

In February 1993, West was charged with one count of malice murder, felony murder and possession of a firearm during the commission of a crime.

An indictment charged West with the November 1990 shooting of Anthony Jackson, who was shot in the chest after complaining about a crack cocaine purchase, according to police records.

Another indictment charged West with the December 1992 shooting of Benjamin D. Williams. Williams was parked on Holloway Drive when he was shot in the head through the rear window, according to police records.

West was also indicted twice in 1992 on charges of possession of cocaine with intent to distribute, according to court records.

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happychimer
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happychimer 12/13/10 - 01:32 pm
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He should never have gotten

He should never have gotten out of prison the 1st time.

gustagirl
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gustagirl 12/13/10 - 01:39 pm
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This is why crime is rampant

This is why crime is rampant in Richmond County, you commit a crime, even murder and you are back out on the street. This joker should have been give at least 99 years without the possibility of parole. Come on justice system what happened with the 1993 case? Malice murder and felony murder?

Labatt
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Labatt 12/13/10 - 01:45 pm
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20 years is BS. Should have

20 years is BS. Should have been life.

TripleBlack
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TripleBlack 12/13/10 - 01:46 pm
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Agree with @happychimer & @

Agree with @happychimer & @ gustagirl at minimum and perhaps more. I would consider that heinous crimes deserve a "public" heinous sentence to be implemented.

KingJames
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KingJames 12/13/10 - 01:48 pm
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Adam, please differentiate

Adam, please differentiate between Jammie West and Bianca West.

"Today, West has some scarring and suffers pain in the burned area"

"West was paroled in August after serving 16 years of a 55-year sentence for voluntary manslaughter and possession of cocaine and was living with his daughter and her mother."

Hatfield0278
1
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Hatfield0278 12/13/10 - 01:53 pm
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The punishment(s) do(es) not

The punishment(s) do(es) not fit the crime(s). Our judicial system is a joke.

jones255
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jones255 12/13/10 - 02:02 pm
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No, the punishment does NOT

No, the punishment does NOT fit the crime. He should've been put to death. His intent was that she be scarred for life, or burn to death. He should be on an express lane to Jackson, for classification and execution.

Aroundtown
50
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Aroundtown 12/13/10 - 02:04 pm
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@KingJames: Good

@KingJames: Good observation.

I wonder if this monster even has remorse.
Thank God that she survived, and hopefully she can have a moving testimony to help others.
Bianca, remember...not all earthly fathers are like yours, but when an earthly father fails us, our Heavenly Father is constant and Loving!

MistaChuckD
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MistaChuckD 12/13/10 - 02:05 pm
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I think (I hope) with his

I think (I hope) with his parole being revoked and this new sentence, the total time he is to spend in jail this time is 69 years.

Here is another small question. Some of you may not think this question belongs here but anyway...

This guy was a convicted felon who was living in public housing. Blum Street is in Allen Homes. Why was he living there. One of the many rules of public housing is no convicted felons are SUPPOSED to be living there.

Maybe, just maybe had mom not let him live there, (in violation of her lease) her daughter may not have been burned by this lunatic.

Farmboy
1043
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Farmboy 12/13/10 - 02:13 pm
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I would love to comment on

I would love to comment on this, but I can't. Sometimes you have to keep your comments to your self, and this is one of those times for me.

Hatfield0278
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Hatfield0278 12/13/10 - 02:14 pm
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MistaChuckD I think that's a

MistaChuckD I think that's a valid question (the felon in public housing). It makes me wonder how many other felons there are benefiting from housing subsidies.

I also found myself questioning if he would have to serve the remainder of his paroled term in addition to his new sentence. Mr. Folk, can you provide any answers here?

Chillen
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Chillen 12/13/10 - 02:29 pm
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Can we just start putting

Can we just start putting these folks out of our misery? We need a swift and certain death penalty.

The taxpayers cannot afford to keep these losers alive. Double offender. Attemped murder. Dealth Penalty was a just punishment.

Additionally the Judge who let this loser out on paraole should lose his (or her) position. There is no excuse for the lax judicial system we have.

bojangles
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bojangles 12/13/10 - 02:32 pm
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A gallon of gas and a match

A gallon of gas and a match are too good for this monster... Is anyone surprised that a felon lived in public housing?

airbud7
1
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airbud7 12/13/10 - 03:12 pm
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Two people murdered, and he

Two people murdered, and he set his daughter on FIRE!!! and yet he will still be FREE in a matter of time!!! Unbelievable???

MistaChuckD
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MistaChuckD 12/13/10 - 03:50 pm
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It is harsh to say, but I

It is harsh to say, but I would not let ANY family member of mine come live in my house after spending 16 years in prison. After that long in prison, you do not know the person.

They didn't know each other after he left prison. The mother brought a stranger into her home and look at what happened.

That guy and his daughter were really just two people sharing the same roof.

realitycheck09
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realitycheck09 12/13/10 - 04:49 pm
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Chillen - Judges don't make

Chillen -

Judges don't make parole decisions. Georgia's department of pardons and paroles do.

Secondly, I totally agree that this was awful. However, a "swift and certain death penalty" really isn't what we need.

If you will review todays news, there is a man who just today in Georgia had DNA evidence cast some doubt on his convictions for killings in Columbus in the late 70s. Texas just last month exonerated a man it executed.

Our system gets it right very, very often. However, anything less than perfection is not enough for a system to dole out the ultimate punishment.

jones255
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jones255 12/13/10 - 04:53 pm
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So the question to be asked

So the question to be asked now is, when is the Augusta Housing Authority going to man up and clean house ?? When are they going to be held accountable, and when they find someone breaking the terms of their lease, are they going to throw their butt out in the street ??

MistaChuckD
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MistaChuckD 12/13/10 - 04:57 pm
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@ Jones255 In order to

@ Jones255

In order to continue getting federal money they have to always have a certain percentage of their units occupied. They will never kick people out the way they should be kicking them out.

Chillen
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Chillen 12/13/10 - 05:04 pm
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realitycheck. I'm no expert

realitycheck. I'm no expert in crime since I've led a clean life, however, I believe that a Judge has to sign off on the parole and can overrule the parole boards decision. And, I say hold the parole board responsible too. The decisions they make affect lives. They should be held accountable.

The case you cite is one in a billion. In most cases there is guilt. Especially with cases since about the mid-1980's where DNA evidence was avaiable (this one qualifies).

Dealth penalty. Swiftly. These folks are wasting our money!!!!! Have no mercy on them. We have GOT to get tough on crime.

realitycheck09
312
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realitycheck09 12/13/10 - 05:09 pm
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Chillen - So the fact that

Chillen -

So the fact that we've had wrongful executions in this country or that we've wrongfully put people on death row is of no matter to you?

It's actually not "one in a billion" as more than 200 people on death row have been exonerated in the last 30 years.

Again, I'm all for a death penalty if we had a perfect system. We do not. It's not about mercy, it's about not supporting state sponsored murder (which is what it is when we execute a wrongfully convicted person).

bettyboop
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bettyboop 12/13/10 - 05:29 pm
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burn ..monster...........

burn ..monster...........

MistaChuckD
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MistaChuckD 12/13/10 - 05:31 pm
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@ Realitycheck09 I agree with

@ Realitycheck09

I agree with you that the possibility of putting an innocent person to death is awful but in certain cases the death penalty is the correct move.

Case in point, witnesses watch this man pour a liquid on another human being and set that human being on fire. There is no doubt of his guilt so what is the problem with letting him sizzle in Jackson, Ga.?

realitycheck09
312
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realitycheck09 12/13/10 - 05:36 pm
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MistaChuckD - This is

MistaChuckD -

This is definitely an awful case. The problem is that if we agree that (a) our jury system is not perfect and that (b) an imperfect jury system with a death penalty will, in fact, make errors, then the question becomes where do we draw the line? My choice is to err on the side of no executions rather than err on the side of executing someone innocent.

Also, I guess to a bigger point you make, the US Supreme Court has ruled that executions for (basically) anything other than murder or treason violate the Constitution.

MistaChuckD
0
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MistaChuckD 12/13/10 - 05:56 pm
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I guess we cannot argue with

I guess we cannot argue with the rulings of the Supreme Court. After all, they have the Great Clarence Thomas there don't they.

You are absolutely correct Realitycheck09. I just needed to get that one in and also, I do believe that some people just need to cease existing.

Suzy Q
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Suzy Q 12/13/10 - 06:40 pm
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This man is a MONSTER. He's

This man is a MONSTER. He's a danger to any innocent human being he comes in contact with for the rest of his life. What is it going to take to make the parole boards realize that some (and I use this term loosely) people should never be released back into civilized society?

I bet he wouldn't have made parole the first time if the man he shot had kin on the parole board.......

realitycheck09
312
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realitycheck09 12/13/10 - 07:06 pm
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lol. Touche, ChuckD.

lol. Touche, ChuckD.

tuffenuf4u
0
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tuffenuf4u 12/13/10 - 07:52 pm
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He's got a fire waiting on

He's got a fire waiting on him, and he will not be able to go to the hospital once he is immersed in it. There is no amount of remorse that he could exhibit that would make him fit for society.

augusta citizen
10700
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augusta citizen 12/13/10 - 08:02 pm
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Ok then reality check, let's

Ok then reality check, let's meet in the middle, when there are witnesses (in this case of setting his own daughter on fire) or video recordings, we swiftly give the death penalty. When it's based on other evidence, we let the trial go forth and then it's case by case. At any rate, in my opinion, when there are witnesses or videos they shouldn't even be allowed to plead "not guilty". This man is evil personified.

albertoli
191
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albertoli 12/13/10 - 08:48 pm
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detritus

detritus

realitycheck09
312
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realitycheck09 12/13/10 - 09:13 pm
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augusta citizen - So, we no

augusta citizen -

So, we no longer get the right to trial when there are "witnesses"? I assure you that the next time eyewitnesses are mistaken or lie will not be the first time.

The problem is that either rights are absolute or we have no rights at all.

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