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Convictions didn't stop city from hiring applicants

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Manslaughter, drug violations, sex crimes and even a contract murder didn't deter the city from offering jobs to some employees, an investigation by The Augusta Chronicle has found.

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Eric Blocker  Special
Special
Eric Blocker

Sometimes the city knew of the felony convictions and chose to hire the applicant anyway. Other times, applicants failed to fully disclose their criminal past, a deception later revealed by background checks. In the cases The Chronicle uncovered, no disciplinary action was taken against the employee for not being truthful.

Though it became city policy in the 1990s to check the backgrounds of applicants for some jobs, that didn't occur in some cases; others began work before the policy took effect and never were checked.

The Chronicle began its investigation after Augusta meter reader Troy Curry was arrested in July and charged with selling crack cocaine out of a city utilities truck.

From 1986 to 2004, Curry had been in and out of prison more than a dozen times on convictions that ran the gamut from felony fraud to drug possession with intent to distribute, according to a criminal background check in his personnel file.

Curry was hired as a laborer in 2006, although the city's criminal background check showed he'd been convicted in Richmond County Superior Court just 12 months before of possession of cocaine with intent to distribute and sentenced to three years in prison. A year later, he transferred to meter reading. The utilities department supervisor and department head both signed off on the transfer, but both said they did not see his criminal record.

Comparing Augusta Human Resources Department records with conviction records in the Augusta Judicial Circuit District Attorney's Office, The Chronicle found a convicted sex offender working at the landfill, a convicted murderer working out of the city administrator's office, and a utilities worker with a history of DUI and driving offenses that date back two decades driving a city truck at work.

In their defense, Augusta officials contend it's nearly impossible to find workers for low-level, low-paying jobs who don't have some kind of criminal record.

The Equal Opportunity Employment Commission makes it impossible to exclude employees for just having a record unless there's a "nexus," meaning the crime they were convicted of is directly relevant to the job they're seeking, said Augusta Human Resources Director Rod Powell.

An example of a nexus would be someone who has been convicted of stealing money who applies for a job in which he would be handling money. After a certain number of years, criminal records become less of a factor in hiring, Powell said.

The city started running criminal background checks on job applicants in the late 1990s, said now-retired Employment Manager Moses McCauley. The results are sent to department directors.

Human resources might recommend hiring or rejecting an applicant, but the department head has the final say.

"Obviously, each person we hire is an individual case, and in some cases a prior criminal record might not have an impact on hiring, depending on the job, type of offense and the time between the offense and the job offer," said Fred Russell, the city administrator. "A good example would be an offense committed several years ago by an individual applying for a laborer's job. If they've been convicted and served their time, would that really have an impact on their ability to rake leaves and shovel dirt?"

Lying on an application is supposed to be grounds for rejecting an applicant or firing if the deception is later discovered. The Chronicle found several examples of applicants lying or being evasive. In most cases, the deceptions could be documented by reviewing the criminal background forms in their city personnel records.

For example, on his 2006 application, Curry checked "yes" after the questions of whether he had ever been arrested, convicted of or pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor or felony, but wrote that the misdemeanor was a "traffic offense" and "2003" for the felony.

The criminal background check revealed that at that point Curry had 21 arrests, two felony parole violations and three probation revocations.

On the application for meter reader in 2008, Curry wrote "to be discussed at interview" beside the questions.

Case details

DONALD E. D'ANTIGNAC, murder

Many employees' files do not contain criminal background reports because they were hired before the city started running them. Such is the case of Donald E. D'Antignac, who works out of the city administrator's office.

Copies of records from D'Antignac's personnel file do not mention his murder conviction or a 1998 arrest in which he was accused of hitting his wife in the head with a bat, a charge that was later dropped. Nor are there any records of three disciplinary grievances filed against him with the city, one for aggressive conduct toward a supervisor in 1996, for which he was reprimanded.

There are no disciplinary reports or other documents concerning his 2001 demotion and $7,123 pay cut after being accused of sexual harassment and intimidation. D'Antignac's supervisor at the time -- Director of Public Works Teresa Smith -- and then-Human Resources Director Brenda Byrd-Pelaez both recommended that he be fired.

A 2005 memo from City Administrator Fred Russell states that D'Antignac was restored to his operations manager title, with an increase in salary. Four months later, in another memo, Russell requested D'Antignac's transfer from the Public Works Road and Bridges Department to the administrator's office. The most recent list of county employees the city provided to The Chronicle , however, lists D'Antignac as an operations manager for the public works department.

Information obtained by The Chronicle from the district attorney's office shows D'Antignac was convicted of killing 22-year-old David Dunn for $5,000 the day after Christmas in 1974.

Dunn was found dead in his 1965 Pontiac LeMans on a dirt road off Old McDuffie Road, shot three times at "point blank" range by a 12-gauge shotgun, according to a coroner's report.

Police arrested D'Antignac the next day, after finding a sawed-off shotgun in his car and a blood-stained tennis shoe in his home.

After Rhonda J. Taylor was given immunity for testimony against D'Antignac, he pleaded guilty and received a life sentence. He was paroled in 1986 after serving 11 years in prison.

Taylor later received a life sentence for a second contract killing in which police said both had participated -- the Nov. 10, 1974, execution-style slaying of Sgt. Jessie Lavert Williams Jr. Charges against D'Antignac were dropped, however, when his statement to police was found to be inadmissible in court.

D'Antignac was hired by the city in 1986, 30 days after he was released from prison and before background checks became policy. Since the criminal background checks began in 1996, D'Antignac has refused to sign a waiver to allow it.

EDITOR'S NOTE: Donald E. D'Antignac's photo was not available from the Richmond County Sheriff's Office or the Georgia Department of Corrections.

ERIC BLOCKER, registered sex offender

In some cases, there is no criminal background report in an employee's file, although the employee has a criminal record.

For example, when Eric Blocker filled out an application for a truck driver's job in the utilities department in 2004, he checked "yes" to the question of whether he had ever been convicted of a felony.

As an explanation, he wrote: "In 1992 I was dating a young lady, later to find out she was a minor. Lewd act with a minor, five years probation ... Record clean since that time."

According to records in the district attorney's office, Blocker is a registered sex offender and his record has not been clean since 1992.

He was arrested and charged in March 1992 with assaulting an 11-year-old girl with the intent to commit criminal sexual conduct in the second degree, according to Aiken County court records. He was given a 10-year suspended sentence and five years' probation.

In August 1996, he was charged with violating probation. Two months later, he was arrested in Richmond County and charged with violating the Employment Security Law in 2002 and 2003 by receiving $7,375 in unemployment benefits from the Georgia Department of Labor while he was employed at an auto parts store. He was convicted and sentenced to five years' probation.

He is now employed as a heavy-equipment operator at the Richmond County landfill.

ROBERT ALFORD BRADLEY, manslaughter

Robert Alford Bradley, alias Robert Alfred Bradley and James Robert Alford Bradley, went to work as a laborer in the utilities department on Feb. 4, 2002. A criminal background report run eight days earlier found he had been charged with felony murder in Richmond County and had been arrested on four other occasions from 1991 through 1999. He was charged with DUI twice, misdemeanor simple battery twice and reckless conduct.

Chronicle archives show that in September 1984, Bradley was accused of shooting and killing Willie Haynes, 31, at the victim's home in Augusta.

Bradley, then 26, claimed it was self-defense -- that he went to talk to his estranged wife and that Haynes shot at him first. His estranged wife, Vera Bradley, said that they were separated and that Bradley intentionally shot Haynes. He pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter and was sentenced to five years in prison. He was paroled in November 1987. Bradley was fired in February from his job as a property and maintenance supervisor after testing positive for alcohol on a drug test, according to city records.

RICKY DWAYNE WILCHER, assault

On Ricky Dwayne Wilcher's application for a job in the utilities department, he left the conviction questions blank, but he has a record.

In November 1997, he was sentenced to five years in prison for stabbing girlfriend Krystal Olivia Roundtree the day after Valentine's Day.

In March 2006, he was charged with aggravated assault, possession of a weapon during the commission of a crime and possession of a weapon by a convicted felon after being accused of shooting at girlfriend Victoria Nicole Jones. The prosecutor dropped the charges in June of that year after Jones testified for Wilcher at a preliminary hearing.

He was hired in January 2007. Under education, he wrote "Georgia Public Safety Training Course, three years, graphic arts and office assistant, also known as 'prison classes.' "

Wilcher is a water and sewer line locator in the construction and maintenance section of the utilities department.

RONALD CLYDE WRIGHT, DUI, drugs, habitual violator

nother example of an applicant's not telling the whole truth on an application is Ronald Clyde Wright, who replaced Troy Curry after Curry was promoted to meter reader -- the position Curry held when he was accused of selling crack in July.

On his application, Wright owned up to a misdemeanor obstruction charge in 2001 and driving without a license in 2000. A criminal history record check Jan. 21, 2009 -- five days before he was to start work -- told a different story, though.

According to the report, Wright has a 1975 felony conviction for the purchase, possession, manufacture, distribution or sale of marijuana, for which he was put on two years' probation. He also was charged with DUI and felony habitual violator in 1985, both of which were dismissed.

In 1996, he was convicted of misdemeanor battery and family violence, and in 1997 he was convicted of DUI and driving while his license was suspended. In 1998, he was convicted of driving on a revoked license and hit-and-run, in addition to battery, DUI and driving on a revoked license.

In 1999, he was convicted of battery, and DUI and habitual violator in 2000.

In 2001, he was convicted of being a habitual violator. He was arrested in June 2003 and accused of hit-and-run while driving under the influence and without a license or insurance, and fighting with the arresting officer. The charges were reduced in 2004, and he was convicted of DUI and misdemeanor obstruction.

Wright now works at the utilities lift station in the maintenance group and drives a city truck.

BLAND MASSIE III, drug possession

When Bland Massie III applied for a job with the recreation department in 2009, he listed a 2005 DUI and a 2009 felony conviction for damage to property. There were other charges that could have been taken into account if he had not been put to work before the city received his criminal background report.

In a June 18, 2009, e-mail to Recreation Department Director Tom Beck, then-Employment Manager Moses McCauley asked what he should do because Massie's criminal background check was still pending. Beck e-mailed back to put it on hold, then an hour and a half later gave permission to process Massie for a part-time maintenance job at the tennis center.

Beck said last week he terminated Massie about three months ago, partly because of performance issues and partly because of budget cuts. Beck said he considers the type of crime a person committed in deciding whether he should be hired. Beck said, for example, he wouldn't hire a person convicted of a violent crime for a job where he would interact with the public.

According to Massie's case file in the district attorney's office, he was arrested in October 2005 and charged with possession of illegal drugs after a Richmond County narcotics officer executed a search warrant at his residence and found 61 Seroquel pills and 0.5 grams of powder cocaine. The arresting officer's report stated he had received information from "a confidential and reliable source" that Massie was selling narcotics from his residence. The source stated that Massie sells marijuana and acts as a "middleman" arranging for other persons to purchase other types of narcotics from third parties, the report states.

Massie received first-offender status and probation on the drug possession charge.

In 2006, he was charged with DUI, but the charge was dismissed. In July 2008, he was charged with a probation violation.

In October 2008, he was arrested on charges of aggravated assault and property damage after being accused of shooting at railroad cars when workers were nearby. The charges were reduced to property damage, for which he received four years' probation. The next month he was charged with a probation violation.

KATRINA JONES, cocaine possession

Katrina Jones' conviction for possession of cocaine in 2002 was never discovered by the city's background check. Jones gave a false Social Security number so the criminal records check was of another person's background. Officials had no explanation for why no one verified the Social Security number.

Jones was fired in 2007 after being charged with stealing more than $12,000 from the landfill division. She was later convicted.

JOHNNIE JAMES WILLIAMS JR., drugs, battery, theft

Johnnie James Williams Jr., who was hired in September 2009 as a meter reader in the utilities department, checked yes on his application's convictions questions, and wrote "will explain at interview."

His criminal history includes a 1989 conviction for driving while license suspended; a 1996 battery charge; a 1996 theft conviction; a 2000 drug conviction; a 2001 burglary charge that was pleaded down to misdemeanor; a 2001 drug arrest and probation violation; a 2002 drug arrest with probation violation; and a 2005 felony conviction of manufacture/sell/distribute cocaine.

He was sentenced to one year in prison and eight years' probation for the 2005 case.

Williams, who drives a city truck, was arrested March 16 for driving without insurance and improper registration. He pleaded no contest to the charges.

-- Sylvia Cooper and Sandy Hodson, staff

Comments (113) Add comment
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jamesmonty
0
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jamesmonty 10/17/10 - 02:09 am
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Good work Augusta Chronicle.

Good work Augusta Chronicle. The city puts people in danger because of their seemingly lack of caring about the criminal record of those they hire.

believe
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believe 10/17/10 - 02:21 am
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This is just absurd. I am a

This is just absurd. I am a hard working person who can't find a decent job. I have never had so much as a traffic ticket! My son is 19 yo and he also can not find a job that pays enough to even cover car insurance, let alone college expenses! Just makes me sick!

addisons65
0
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addisons65 10/17/10 - 02:54 am
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Looks like the "good ole'

Looks like the "good ole' boy" system is fully at work in Augusta.Crooks hiring crooks?? I bet it would be a real surprise if an investigation could be carried out of all those who have authority to hire. Surely we are not so desperate as to have to hire "thugs" since there are no other decent people qualified for the jobs. We need to look beyond race, religion, and sex to get the jobs done! The "good ole' boy" system is not meant racially! It is a fact of life in every race.

Asitisinaug
3
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Asitisinaug 10/17/10 - 03:31 am
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Chronicle: Good Job, I am

Chronicle: Good Job, I am impressed. Now, lets have a follow up story ASAP with responses for this disaster from our Mayor, Commissoners and Fred Russell as well as all of those running for these positions currently. Our local government fails to hold employees acountable, fails to follow policies, wastes our money, hires many based on who they know vs. what they know or how qualified they are, keep liars and thieves employed even when the lie to get the job, lie to keep the job or steal from taxpayers while on the job. Enough is enough with this entitlement mentatility.

bettyboop
7
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bettyboop 10/17/10 - 05:33 am
0
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This is completely

This is completely unbelievable!..............What a sad state of affairs when honest hard working folks can't get a job with the city but these thugs can?.....Just who is it that these child molesters murdurers...thieves...drug dealers know over there that allows this? What is it about them that gives them a pass? What could it be?

johnston.cliff
2
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johnston.cliff 10/17/10 - 05:58 am
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What type of employee is

What type of employee is being prepared by our government schools? Could it be a....government employee?
The second tier management, the ones who never get seen and never get quoted in the paper, are the ones making the hiring and firing decisions.
The current system is in place. It will take a "top down" clean-up to bring about a lasting change. The question is, will the improvement be worth the expense? Or, from the management perspective, will the improvement be worth the effort?

This excellent report just confirms the facts some of us have known for years. I'm sure many readers will find it just another effort to attack parts of our society.

Brad Owens
4102
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Brad Owens 10/17/10 - 06:12 am
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DON D'ANTIGNAC is a funny

DON D'ANTIGNAC is a funny guy. He calls me his favorite 'Clucker' as in Ku Kluxer but he says "Clucker." He has always been political since I met him and he is 'connected' for sure. Not sure the back story on this one but it was not accident he was hired I am sure.

Anyway, I have mixed feelings. On one hand we say that we want criminals to become reformed and get jobs yet we complain when we find them and are hired.

I do not think that a person having committed a crime should be put on the leper list for getting a job or we will have someone who will turn back to crime.

However, do we want contract killers on the city payroll? Not sure really. I know Don from politics and I have always found him to be funny and involved not dangerous or rotten. But then again, he has an edge to him that you can see. I mean his crime was 35 years ago but it was serious. I wish we had more details on WHAT happened.

I wish that the Chronicle would ask all the Mayor and Commission candidates what they think of this.

Now THAT would be funny. You know that Deke "The Meek" will have no comment but he should be asked.

Brad

Abby-noll
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Abby-noll 10/17/10 - 06:47 am
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I'm with you, Brad. I too

I'm with you, Brad. I too have mixed feelings about this.

I know when I started I was fingerprinted by the Marshall's department for a background. Is that not something all RC employee's do?

Abby-noll
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Abby-noll 10/17/10 - 06:53 am
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I have a brother that was

I have a brother that was convicted of obstruction of a LEO without violence, which is a Felony. Basically, he was drunk at his own home and the police showed up for two girls next door that were fighting and decided to approach him (they had the wrong address) and he couldn't help but run his mouth. Was he right? Heck naw! But he shouldn't miss out on great jobs because when he was 22 he was stupid and mouthy. As Ron White says "He had the right to remain silent, he just didn't have the ability".

bettyboop
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bettyboop 10/17/10 - 07:08 am
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abby I get your point....but

abby I get your point....but these guys are not mouthy drunks....we're talking Child molesters...murder for hire....drug dealers....big difference.

AWyld1
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AWyld1 10/17/10 - 07:21 am
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I have no problem hire a

I have no problem hire a convicted felon.Depending on the job they will be required to do and the amount of responsibility thatjob would entail.That being said I thought it was a criminal offense to knowingly lie on a job application. Why aren't some of these liars being prosecuted?

OhWell
326
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OhWell 10/17/10 - 07:26 am
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I agree with abby-roll with

I agree with abby-roll with cases such as her brothers, yes these type people should be given a second chance. If society is not going to hire them to be productive their next crime will be even more serious. But RC is setting up for the county to be sued if we hire Child Molesters, Murders etc. I do not have a problem with someone that has a DUI being hired but don't put them in a county vehicle. Seems to me RC needs a new Human Resource Manager that has guidelines to follow that the good old boy system cannot twist to make work for their friends.

Abby-noll
0
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Abby-noll 10/17/10 - 08:10 am
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betty, that's my point. It

betty, that's my point. It has to be taken on a case by case basis. You can't just say "nobody with a criminal background." With the child molesters, murderers etc. I don't think these people should even be free, much less working for RC.

hopefulinaugusta
0
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hopefulinaugusta 10/17/10 - 08:40 am
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Ok then where do people think

Ok then where do people think a convicted felon should work. They have to work when they get out of prison, and when does a person stop paying for the crimes. Mr D'Antignac was released 24 years ago and the crime that he committed and served time for was 35 years ago. If you don't want a person to be reformed and if you don't give them a chance to earn an honest living then what do you think there next move will be. I personally think it is a shame that the chronicle posted this gentlemans record with it being that old, and him obviously being reformed.

TheMaskedMan
7
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TheMaskedMan 10/17/10 - 08:49 am
0
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The best indicator of a

The best indicator of a person's future actions are their past actions. The first people to be fired should be those in Human Resources for not doing their jobs.

TheMaskedMan
7
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TheMaskedMan 10/17/10 - 08:55 am
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D'Antignac should have been

D'Antignac should have been fired in 2005, Fred Russell should be fired for sheltering D'Antignac. Something is really fishy about how at a time the guy should have been fired, he was restored his title, given a raise and transferred to Administration and is still listed as operations manager of public works. Russell and D'Antignac ought to both be fired.

dichotomy
30620
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dichotomy 10/17/10 - 09:02 am
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No, it should not be on a

No, it should not be on a case by case basis. It should be on a conviction for a crime basis. There should be firm rules for convictions for certain crimes....and here is why. If you say "case by case" then you leave the wiggle room for the buddy system, the good ole' boys system to play. And to do a "case by case" you also have to assume that some personnel clerk or manager will take the time to actually investigate the details of a manslaughter conviction, murder conviction, rape conviction, etc. I don't think we should allow a personnel clerk to second guess a jury or a plea bargain (which usually means the actual crime was even worse). Make firm rules of what crimes and what time limits will be ignored and what crimes are show stoppers. A "case by case" leaves things wide open for all criminal backgrounds to be ignored and that is what we have going on right now. We already know that none of our county employees, particularly in the personnel and legal departments, have any judgement. Why would we leave the choice to hire criminals up to these employees? We need firm rules, not good ole' boy rules.

TheMaskedMan
7
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TheMaskedMan 10/17/10 - 09:09 am
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Hopeful - are you kidding me?

Hopeful - are you kidding me? D'Antignac is consistent in continuing his pattern of agressive behaviors. He has not reformed. Go back and read the three disciplinary grievances in 1996 including agressive conduct against his supervisor, the 1998 arrest for hitting his wife in the head with a baseball bat, his 2001 demotion and paycut for sexual harassment and intimidation with recommendations from his supervisor and director of HR to fire him. Then in 2005 Fred Russell restores his title, gives him a raise and then only four months later transfers him to administration. They don't transfer people out of the blue like that - he was moved due to a problem. Fred's afraid and he has every reason to be afraid.

cubbie
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cubbie 10/17/10 - 09:11 am
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So, what'cha gonna do about

So, what'cha gonna do about it ? Just leave them in the jobs ? Augusta gov't will do just that. And continue to march. Some things will never change.

Riverman1
79416
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Riverman1 10/17/10 - 09:12 am
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There's too much wheeling and

There's too much wheeling and dealing with D'Antignac and Fred Russell. What's that all about? It appears D'Antignac gets what he wants and when he wants it. He has someone scared. We need to get to the bottom of it.

A contract killer is paroled after serving only 11 years? How do you think the family of the murdered man feels?

Plus, look at D'Antignac's problems since coming to work for the county.

Riverman1
79416
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Riverman1 10/17/10 - 09:17 am
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What about the second

What about the second contract killing he was apparently involved in? His female partner got life, but he was let off on a technicality.

When he got out of prison, he is hired by the county 30 days later. I have a feeling this guy literally knows where the bodies are buried.

dani
12
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dani 10/17/10 - 09:28 am
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One of many reasons we should

One of many reasons we should vote them out. Didn't I hear Fred say that he has been on the job now for 9 years? I hope he wasn't bragging. I

WW1949
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WW1949 10/17/10 - 09:42 am
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Believe, go on down to the

Believe, go on down to the city employment office and apply for the jobs. I am sure you will like the pay Low paying jobs are hard to fill and the people with some kind of records are the ones that apply. That is the way it will always be.

Abby-noll
0
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Abby-noll 10/17/10 - 09:53 am
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dichotomy: "Make firm rules

dichotomy: "Make firm rules of what crimes and what time limits will be ignored and what crimes are show stoppers. "

I didn't mean allow one murderer work and not another... I meant case by case based on the actual crime. You can't just say "any felony" because they are not all equal. I think some charges that are misdemeanors should be a felony, and some things that are a felony should be misdemeanors, IMHO... but I don't make the laws.

Ya know, dichotomy, perhaps you should read someone's entire post before you disagree with them. The last sentence in the post you referred to was "With the child molesters, murderers etc. I don't think these people should even be free, much less working for RC."

getalife
4
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getalife 10/17/10 - 09:48 am
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This article not only points

This article not only points out the hiring practices of the local government, but it should also point out the fact that our justice system is broke. Many of the people in this article should still be in prison. Not sure how murderers get off in a few years and to murder again?? We need a complete overhaul of our so called justice system.

OhWell
326
Points
OhWell 10/17/10 - 09:51 am
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Many times as a manager I

Many times as a manager I wanted to hire someone with a few bones in their closet (not criminal activity but reports from former employees and references) and I could not due to company policy. We had strict hiring as well as firing policies and they worked well. The city of Augusta should have very set in place policies on hiring as well as dismissal policies. I feel that Augusta leaves itself open to some serious legal issues the way human resources works now. If I were a person seeking a job and I knew that job went to one of the above offenders I would be out trying to see if any Labor Rules had been broken with the offender getting the job over someone who was just as qualified but did not have a record.

Brad Owens
4102
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Brad Owens 10/17/10 - 09:52 am
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0
dichotomy, Your attitude on

dichotomy,

Your attitude on this is way wrong. There are plenty of people out there with criminal pasts that are good folks who made a msitake.

I guess in your world we should just kill all law breakers? I mean what is the reason for prison if it is not for society to be paid back for the crimes committed.

And when someone pays that back to us, should we forgive or make them pay for the rest of their life?

Brad

Chillen
17
Points
Chillen 10/17/10 - 09:54 am
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The people who hired these

The people who hired these folks should be fired immediately. The human resources manager & staff should be fired immediately for incompetence. This is inexcusable. Looks to me like the city was going for a certain race of employee no matter what their background.

It should be crystal clear to everyone now that the government is not so pure. Their intentions are not so good. They are as bad or worse than ANY private business I know. They are corrupt and incompetent beyond belief. This is true locally, at the state level and especially at the federal level.

And they are using YOUR tax money to do it. Wake up and vote in some change in November. In all levels of government. I can't take it anymore!

hopefulinaugusta
0
Points
hopefulinaugusta 10/17/10 - 09:54 am
0
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"a 1998 arrest in which he

"a 1998 arrest in which he was accused of hitting his wife in the head with a bat, a charge that was later dropped." You cannot convict a person on a dropped charge, and therefore it has no business in his personel file. Do you really think this man intimidated his way up the ranks or do you think maybe he is a good worker. I personally don't know the man but he has been able to keep his job for some reason.

And with the revolving door that our prison system has become there are definately more felons than these few that have gotten out and are working and making a living and have truly changed, why close a door that is open to them that gives them a chance to prove that they have changed.

hopefulinaugusta
0
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hopefulinaugusta 10/17/10 - 10:00 am
0
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Chillin, what do you mean the

Chillin, what do you mean the city was going for a certain race of employee??? Did you look at all the pictures?

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