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Collins teacher lost baby after attack by pupil

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A 13-year-old student's attack on a pregnant Collins Elementary School teacher earlier this year caused the teacher to lose her baby, according to documents filed Thursday in Richmond County Juvenile Court.



The Jan. 20 incident initially wasn't reported to law enforcement. The Richmond County School Safety Department stepped in to investigate only after Lt. Richard Roundtree got a call from a Chronicle reporter.

School officials have thus far refused to comment on the baby's condition, saying only that the teacher was examined by a school nurse, instructed to see her physician and on leave for three school days after the incident.

The teen, a special needs student, is charged with aggravated battery in the attack, during which a teacher -- trying to break up a fight -- was struck repeatedly on her body and "intentionally" in the stomach, according to a complaint Roundtree submitted to juvenile authorities.

A petition filed Thursday by the state Department of Juvenile Justice says the boy committed aggravated battery against the teacher by "rendering a member of her body, to wit: an unborn fetus, useless by punching said victim in the abdomen." Roundtree's report says she was approximately 10 weeks pregnant at the time.

Reports obtained from the school system by The Chronicle say the attack happened as the 13-year-old brought his 12-year-old brother, also a special needs student, to the teacher's class to confront another student who "had been bothering him."

According to one report, the 13-year-old left his class to get his brother, and when they entered the pregnant teacher's room she asked them to leave, "but they refused."

As the two brothers approached the student, the teacher stepped between them "and immediately began being struck in the stomach and arms by (the 13-year-old) offender."

A tribunal report says the older brother "hit a teacher in the eye, knocked over a podium onto a student, causing injury to the student, and hit a pregnant teacher on her arm and in her stomach."

The teacher finally pushed the brothers out of the class and they were taken to the school office.

Initially, the school system's safety office wasn't notified by the school's principal, Thomas Norris, who said he reported the case to the school system's central office.

After learning about the incident five days later, Roundtree initiated an investigation to determine whether criminal charges were warranted.

He said at the time that his office prefers to be called in immediately anytime a teacher or student is injured.

Neither Norris nor Roundtree returned calls Thursday. Superintendent Dana Bedden was in Texas, where he is a candidate to head the Irving Independent School District.

After a Feb. 2 tribunal, the 13-year-old was assigned to Tubman Education Center Alternative Program for two years, but the panel agreed to revise that decision should the student become eligible for the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support program.

His younger brother, who officials said did not strike the teacher, was suspended for five days.

After the teen was charged criminally on Feb. 5, he went to juvenile court for a detention hearing. Judge Ben Allen said he appeared heavily medicated, so he ordered him to be sent to Serenity Behavioral Health to have his medications adjusted.

The judge also ordered that he wear a tracking ankle bracelet and undergo a psychological competency evaluation.

"We need to know something about him, mentally," Judge Allen said.

An arraignment date hasn't been set.

Staff Writer Preston Sparks contributed to this article.

Comments (44) Add comment
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concernednative
28
Points
concernednative 03/12/10 - 02:54 am
0
0
It seems as if the principal

It seems as if the principal and whoever he reported it to @ the central office have some explaining to do.

johnston.cliff
2
Points
johnston.cliff 03/12/10 - 05:49 am
0
0
Does anyone know why this

Does anyone know why this "boy" and his brother are "special needs"? In our politically correct education system (read social engineering) nothing really seems to have a set meaning. By using words with shifting and multiple meaning to set the foundation for an article, we find the meaning of the article can be changed almost at will.

whocareswhatyouthink
0
Points
whocareswhatyouthink 03/12/10 - 06:13 am
0
0
I believe that his "special

I believe that his "special needs" can be adequately met by confining him to an 6 x 8 foot room for the next 5 or 6 decades.
As for the Judges comment that "We need to know something about him, mentally," No we don't. He is an animal and animals belong in cages when they exhibit violent tendencies...

deekster
24
Points
deekster 03/12/10 - 06:21 am
0
0
Special Needs Children means

Special Needs Children means "more federal dollars for the school system". Special Need Children means "more federal dollars" for "the single mom or grandma" who babysits same. The more "special needs people" the more SSI, WIC and welfare. Buy them votes!!!! Absenteeism means "less federal dollars for the school system". If they show up for "breakfast at school" they have given 150%. They are counted present for 180 days. Augusta-RC is a "Special Needs Child".

cristinadh
6
Points
cristinadh 03/12/10 - 06:32 am
0
0
This student sounds to me

This student sounds to me like what they classify as an emotional behavioral disorder which has nothing to do with whether he can learn or not.. what he lacks is home training and discipline from the parents.. the parents are to blame for this and the loss of this human life that didn't even have a chance..

southernguy08
532
Points
southernguy08 03/12/10 - 06:48 am
0
0
We're going to have armed
Unpublished

We're going to have armed guards and alarm buttons in every classroom in public schools pretty soon. What do we expect when these fatherless kids are dumped on the schools with the attitude, "They're your problem til this afternoon?" Lock these punks up and throw away the key. Make them an example to others or this WILL happen again!

sgachief
0
Points
sgachief 03/12/10 - 07:56 am
0
0
special need alright, animals

special need alright, animals need to be caged!!!

MomInRC
0
Points
MomInRC 03/12/10 - 08:14 am
0
0
Deekster, You hit the nail on

Deekster,
You hit the nail on the head. Special needs used to mean learning disabilities. Now, they lump together all the kids called "bad" ones in our school days. Money has to be the only motive for labeling these kids as such. Granted, some kids have emotional problems (which should be addressed by the parents/doctors/counselors) who are placed in these classes, but the majority simply need discipline.

Little Lamb
48900
Points
Little Lamb 03/12/10 - 08:18 am
0
0
Grouse, your comment is a

Grouse, your comment is a good one. The third paragraph above is poorly written. School officials cannot possibly have any meaningful comment on the “baby's condition.” Hopefully Johnny Edwards will re-write that paragraph.

ZenoElia
1
Points
ZenoElia 03/12/10 - 08:20 am
0
0
Back in my school days we had

Back in my school days we had hall monitors...don't they have this now? Why were kids allowed to roam the halls during class w/o escort? Parenting is the problem, adding fuel to the fire is the meds this kid was probably on...and as said above...too much emphasis on funding for these programs allows an excuse for behavior problem children...make these kids go to a school where cops are stationed outside each classroom and where parents must sign a waiver for strict discipline for these unruly children...once these kids get the message the have no power to misbehave w/o threat of jail or physical restraint, they will behave...don't let these kids play video games or watch tv or listen to gangsta rap...all these media forms encourage the bad behavior on those who are mentally imbalanced very strict routines and controlled environments are the best way to keep the behavior in check...I hope they do lock him up for life...he deserves no less than that for taking another life.

Little Lamb
48900
Points
Little Lamb 03/12/10 - 08:27 am
0
0
I guess law enforcement felt

I guess law enforcement felt they had no choice but to charge the kid with aggravated battery, but I predict that nothing will come of these charges. The school system has all but given this kid a free pass in the juvenile court system by labeling him “special needs.” A good lawyer and a paid psychiatrist will have the court declaring the kid is incompetent to stand trial. He will be back in the mainstream by August. He'll probably have to repeat the grade, and he'll be 14 by then. How crazy is that?

When Preston Sparks first wrote about this incident in February, I asked the question on this forum:

What grade is this 13-year old in?

The Chronicle still has not seen fit to tell us readers.

tinytuna
74
Points
tinytuna 03/12/10 - 09:49 am
0
0
The majority of Special

The majority of Special Education (new name: Special Needs) students have been placed in the general education setting (inclusion). During the past few years, Inclusion has been the big push. Self-contained classes are a thing of the past, really. There aren't many Self-Contained Emotional Behavior Classes anymore (if any). These students really need help and they do well in Self-Contained Classes. To dump these students out into the general population with all other students is such a tragedy for everyone concerned.

survey1
0
Points
survey1 03/12/10 - 09:28 am
0
0
I don't see where the teacher

I don't see where the teacher has blamed anybody for anything. She was trying to keep the boys from beating up an innocent child. I can't believe any sane person would blame the teacher, put the blame where it belongs...I would be willing to bet these kids will be in and out of jail/prison for the rest of their lives. Either way, in or out of jail we will be paying for them for the rest of their lives.....

JustMe
0
Points
JustMe 03/12/10 - 09:38 am
0
0
Read this again bree026. She

Read this again bree026. She didn't step between them when they were fighting. It was prior to any fighting. The school system hasn't commented thus far...that doesn't mean now that means since the beginning. The school system felt it did not have the right to put out private information. That is against the law. It was up to the teacher to do that. When I was growing up there were special ed classes now the govenment wants to streamline these kids...that is just wrong, wrong, wrong.

Veryworriedparent
0
Points
Veryworriedparent 03/12/10 - 09:47 am
0
0
When is this madness gonna

When is this madness gonna stop. In the Pine Hills school on March 10th a student was attacked and stabbed in the eye while a teacher watched. The teacher claims she was afraid of the middle schoolkids. As a result, a student is permanently blinded. But the school has decided to hush this up, because of bad publicity. Home schooling may be the only answer. The schoools can't protect our children. They don't care. And the gov't only wants to keep taking money from the teachers. Who even cares it our children are properly taught.

tinytuna
74
Points
tinytuna 03/12/10 - 09:55 am
0
0
It is amazing what the school

It is amazing what the school system hushes up. Then the Chronicle gets the information. Teachers' hands are tied behind their backs.

Equaltreatmentforall
49
Points
Equaltreatmentforall 03/12/10 - 10:03 am
0
0
Special needs is a broad

Special needs is a broad catch all term. This person has learned he can do what he pleases and "special needs" will cover his back. When others actions impact our lives negatively those actions need to be controlled either by separation or elimination. It seems the victim's rights are being protected less and the perputator's rights are all important. This needs to change.

Little Lamb
48900
Points
Little Lamb 03/12/10 - 10:05 am
0
0
We probably have a hundred

We probably have a hundred schools in the CSRA. There are probably at least a half-dozen fights out of those hundred schools each day. The Chronicle would choke on information overload if the schools systems phoned in all the fights and demanded that the newspaper print the fight stories.

I don't think the school systems are “hushing up” the fight stories. I think they are not all newsworthy.

Veryworriedparent
0
Points
Veryworriedparent 03/12/10 - 10:13 am
0
0
Your right about the amount

Your right about the amount of fights in our schools, but how many have permanent damage being done. I know from people in Pine Hills, they were told to talk to nobody.

walkerjones
3
Points
walkerjones 03/12/10 - 10:32 am
0
0
Wow Veryworriedparent! I

Wow Veryworriedparent! I didn't know about that incident at Pine Hills Middle school. Apparently it was covered up and hush-hushed. As for this story, I am sorry that the teacher, who was concerned for the well-fared of her student, lost her unborn baby. And as for the student who was responsible, I wonder if he feels any remorse, and if he does, is it because he's truly remorseful of ending the life of potential productive citizen or remorseful that he's in trouble.

Johnny Edwards
0
Points
Johnny Edwards 03/12/10 - 11:41 am
0
0
While I always appreciate

While I always appreciate writing advice from an avatar, Little Lamb, what I'm saying in the third paragraph is that we've repeatedly asked school officials to tell us what happened to the baby - including, by the way, Principal Norris - and they've refused. We now know, on the record, that the baby's condition is dead. Do you follow?
And it's not that we've just not seen fit to tell our readers what grade he's in, as if we get some kind of pleasure out of it, it's that we don't know, at least not on the record. Because school officials aren't exactly answering all our questions here, and because Preston Sparks had no luck interviewing the teacher and her family, it took a lot of work for me to get the fact that the baby died from a source I could quote. When we get his grade, we'll print that, too.

Little Lamb
48900
Points
Little Lamb 03/12/10 - 11:32 am
0
0
Thank you, Johnny, for the

Thank you, Johnny, for the clarification. I can appreciate that it would be frustrating for you to have to wrangle information from a government agency that does not want to release the information. It would be frustrating and angering for me, too.

I'm sure you can see my angle about the boy's grade. The name of the school is Collins Elementary School. Normally, such a school would be K through 5th grade. But because of re-structuring at Tubman, some middle-school students have been shuffled around the system. If Collins is now housing (some might say warehousing) middle school students mixed in with the K-5 population, they may be fostering an undesirable condition.

It might help us understand “something about him, mentally” (to use juvenile court judge Ben Allen’s phrase) to know what grade he is in. If he's a 13-year-old fifth grader versus being a 13-year-old eighth grader, it could make a judge rule differently vis a vis his capacity to be competent to stand trial.

jack
10
Points
jack 03/12/10 - 12:09 pm
0
0
Ever since I was a graduate

Ever since I was a graduate student learning about "maknstreaming" special ed (now sepcial needs) students into the regular classroom, I have iopposed it. These children do have special "needs" and that is a class room enviroment of strict discipline which can not be given in a regular classroom. These kids cheat the other students out of a good education because too much of the teacher's time is spent trying to control the uncontrollable. Putting them in public, regular classes is nothing more than making the school system a day care facility for their parents. The older one in this case should get time in YDC, but I doubt it with the bleeding heart judges we have.

Patty-P
3520
Points
Patty-P 03/12/10 - 12:23 pm
0
0
In other words, the judge is

In other words, the judge is going to make an excuse for this juvenile, give him a slap on the wrist, and send him on his way. Another crime committed by a juvenile and no doubt he will do it again. There can't be hundreds of teens with mental problems here in Augusta. The problem here is grown folks trying to remain 'politically correct', who are condoning youth ignorance and violent behavior. The juvenile system will dip and dodge to the point of being outright dishonest in order to keep these juveniles on the streets doing what they do. And when these kids realize that there really is no consequence for their actions, they repeat the behavior until some innocent person suffers a loss. Lock them up first, figure it out later. Quit with the blame game and the excuses. That is why the crime rate is what it is here in Augusta. And it's going to get worse.

dstewartsr
20393
Points
dstewartsr 03/12/10 - 12:33 pm
0
0
Watching the television news

Watching the television news last night, it reported the 'youth' received five days suspension and was placed on some sort of 'watch list.' In shorter words: Walked scott-free.

DaddyFrog
46
Points
DaddyFrog 03/12/10 - 01:46 pm
0
0
A student "intentionally"

A student "intentionally" beats a teacher in the stomach to kill her baby,a boy shoots & kills a pregnant teenage girl and her baby,a gang
of boys beat an innocent boy nearly to death and gloat about it; has the world gone mad ? What will these kids be like in a few years?They will have no compunction about killing anyone for any trivial reason.The destruction of the family has caused the majority of all this.No social worker no matter how hard they try can take the place of a loving mother AND father.I know this isn't politically correct & will cause a firestorm, but no spiritual guidance in the home has contributed greatly to what is happening with these young people.I firmly believe in the following: " No God..No Peace. Know God..Know Peace."

Lou Stewall
374
Points
Lou Stewall 03/12/10 - 02:00 pm
0
0
At 10 weeks the fetus is the

At 10 weeks the fetus is the size of a small strawberry. As upsetting as it might be, a lawyer will get the retard acquitted because there are many spontaneous abortions in the early stages of pregnancies. Only in the unlikely event there was an autopsy showing physical damages, the 'tard might get sentenced.

Patty-P
3520
Points
Patty-P 03/12/10 - 02:42 pm
0
0
And by the way, a tracking

And by the way, a tracking bracelet is a waste of funding. The agencies that DJJ employs to 'track' these youth don't report anything. These kids are still out at all times of night WITH the bracelet on. It is a waste of time and money. Money paid to these tracking agencies could be used somewhere else. Like in the SCHOOL system, or to build a bigger YDC jail.

belle
311
Points
belle 03/12/10 - 02:48 pm
0
0
ok, here is where I am
Unpublished

ok, here is where I am confused.....no doubt this boy could have and may have caused terminal damage to the fetus but did the baby die then or now, two months later? In which case how can they be certain that it was that attack that ultimately led to loss of the baby?

sassylassie
517
Points
sassylassie 03/12/10 - 04:37 pm
0
0
Where's Lou Svehla on this

Where's Lou Svehla on this one? He seems to have something to say, or an answer, for everything else. He can't answer your questions, Mr. Edwards? Just curious. He's mighty quiet on this one. Because he speaks on Bedden's behalf so much, why can't he call him in Texas and get an answer for you on this one? I'd ask, if I were you.

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