Renewable energy facility announced for Augusta Corporate Park

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A new renewable energy facility announced Thursday for Augusta Corporate Park will find its main source of power coming from neighboring Starbucks’ waste.

Augusta Renewable En­er­gy LLC will process used coffee grounds from the new Starbucks soluble plant as its primary renewable-energy source after the facility opens next year, according to an announcement from the Augusta Economic Develop­ment Authority.

Augusta Renewable Energy is spending about $20 million to build its first anaerobic digestion facility in Georgia. The company, a division of Columbia-based First Generation Energy, will create about 10 highly technical positions.

Construction of the site, which will span about eight acres of the industrial park off Mike Padgett Highway, is expected to start before the end of the year and be completed by mid- to late summer, said Daniel Rickenmann, the operating partner for First Generation Energy.

The 180,000-square-foot Starbucks plant has an opening date planned for early 2014.

“Primarily using coffee grounds, Augusta (Renewable) Energy will convert a landfill component into energy,” authority Chairman Henry Ingram said in a news release.

First Generation Energy is a diversified service company that provides zero-waste solutions and small power generation options for industries, food manufacturers, renewable energy and utilities. The company has formed a partnership with environmental technology provider Eisenmann for the installation and technical support during the plant’s implementation process. Caterpillar will assist with the facility, according to the authority. First Generation Energy also will provide a private label line of soil amendments through a partnership with an unnamed Fortune 200 company.

“Green energy is the wave of the future,” Augusta Mayor Deke Copenhaver said in a statement, “and Augusta Renewable Energy will do their part to make sure we are efficient in our energy needs in the years to come.”

ANAEROBIC DIGESTION

Anaerobic digestion is a process in which microorganisms break down organic waste material, such as coffee grounds, in the absence of oxygen and produce a solid residue and biogas, made primarily of methane and carbon dioxide.

Biogas can be used as a source of energy that’s similar to natural gas, and the solid residue can be used in land applications to improve soil.

Anaerobic digestion is beneficial for renewable energy generation, greenhouse gas emissions reduction and waste diversion.

Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

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countyman
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countyman 11/07/13 - 11:27 pm
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Growth in South Augusta

The people who continue to bash Mr. Kwatinetz owe him even more of an apology..

He already helped bring the $172 million Starbucks facility here and now another $20 million building is directly related to the Starbucks facility. On top of the ARC project creating the Mills/Cultural Campuses and the renovation of the former chamber of commerce building.

Riverman1
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Riverman1 11/08/13 - 08:02 am
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Starbucks and Kwatinetz

Starbucks does like these kind of green initiatives. This facility using the coffee grounds sounds like its right up their alley. Great idea.

Concerning Matthew Kwatinetz, he is coming up with interesting ideas. He’s a Harvard educated whiz concerning urban development. But I simply ask how he is being paid? You previously said he was being paid from Copenhaver’s Augusta Regional Collaboration Project funds. It was reported two weeks ago that the county provided $300,000 to fund Copenhaver’s organization. So isn’t the county, in fact, paying Kwatinetz salary? How much is he being paid and does the Commission have any say on the matter considering Copenhaver’s project is being largely funded by the county?

David Parker
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David Parker 11/08/13 - 09:31 am
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Been doing this for years in

Been doing this for years in my backyard for the veggies. j/k. This is good stuff Cman. Augusta is the Garden City, it should be the greenest city in Ga as well, if not Southeast. Keep the momentum up. HIGH FIVES all around!!!

countyman
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countyman 11/08/13 - 11:38 am
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Facts

The city donated $100k to the renovation of the chamber of commerce and $300k towards developing the Mills/Cultural campuses...

The ARC project is paying Mr. Kwatinetz through private donations...

Riverman1
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Riverman1 11/08/13 - 03:30 pm
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Questions

All that I really know is the county gave $300,000 to Copenhaver's ARC project. Where that money is spent I don't think anyone really knows. But if you know definitively, I'll listen. You are saying the ARC project is paying Kwatinetz via private donations. So is the money given to ARC kept separate from that donated by that one "philanthropist"? I really doubt that.

Gage Creed
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Gage Creed 11/08/13 - 08:59 pm
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I wonder if this South

I wonder if this South Augusta "Green" energy plant will ever come to fruition. Hopefully it will not just be a flash-in-the pan, like the BARD-ABS project.

Gage Creed
19395
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Gage Creed 11/09/13 - 08:27 pm
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Ewwwwwwwwww.... groveling is

Ewwwwwwwwww.... groveling is so toady...

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