Pressure on Bangladesh, retailers to fix factories

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DHAKA, Bangladesh — In the aftermath of a building collapse that killed more than 500 people, Bangladesh’s garment manufacturers might face a choice of reform or perish.

Earth movers work to remove rubble Friday at the site of a factory that collapsed. More than 500 bodies have been recovered from the debris of the building.  ISMAIL FERDOUS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISMAIL FERDOUS/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Earth movers work to remove rubble Friday at the site of a factory that collapsed. More than 500 bodies have been recovered from the debris of the building.

The Rana Plaza tragedy nine days ago followed the deaths of 112 people five months ago in a blaze that swept through the Tazreen Fashions garment factory in Dhaka and the death of seven in a January blaze.

With three disasters in quick succession, the reputation of Bangladesh’s $20 billion garment industry, notorious for its low wages and dismal safety record, has plummeted. International clothing brands and retailers that said they could ensure worker safety in developing countries through self-regulation such as factory inspections have also suffered a blow to their credibility.
Now, Bangladesh’s garment manufacturers fear that a backlash has been set in motion that threatens fortunes and livelihoods in a business that employs more than 3 million people and accounts for about 80 percent of the impoverished country’s exports.

“It’s a crucial time for us,” said Atiqul Islam, the president of the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association. “We are doing our best to improve the safety measures in the factories. We expect our buyers to bear with us and help us to overcome the current crisis.”

The most potent warning so far has come from the European Union, which said it could restrict Bangladesh’s access to the crucial EU market if it doesn’t immediately take steps to ensure basic labor standards are enforced.

Bangladesh is a member of Europe’s “Everything But Arms” program for the world’s poorest nations that exempts it from quotas and tariffs on all exports to the 27-nation EU except armaments. The EU is Bangladesh’s single biggest market with exports of 8 billion euros in 2011.

The United States is also reviewing Bangladesh’s preferential trade status. Garments are not included in the American trade preferences for Bangladesh, but loss of its special market access would further taint its reputation in the U.S., its second largest export market.

As a U.S. decision nears, the building collapse gives additional momentum to members of Congress who wrote to Bangladeshi Prime Minister Shiekh Hasina to protest a climate of fear created by the killing of Aminul Islam, the labor organizer, and lobbied then-U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk to speed up a review of Bangladesh’s trade access after the Tazreen fire.

Signs of dissension are also emerging among clothing brands and retailers who as a group have usually sought to distance themselves from industry disasters.

The chief executive of Canada’s Loblaw Inc., which owns the Joe Fresh clothing line that was being made in Rana Plaza, decried the response of “deafening silence” from what he said were more than two dozen other international retailers who used garment factories in the collapsed building.

After the Tazreen fire where Walt Disney Co. branded clothing was found, the company in March added Bangladesh to a list of countries where it prohibits any of its clothing or merchandize from being produced.

The Bangladeshi garment association met earlier this week with representatives of 40 garment buyers including H&M, JC Penny, Gap, Nike, Li & Fung and Tesco. It said the companies have doubts about whether the industry can meet their production deadlines because of the disasters and political turmoil.

“The reality is that buyers are seriously thinking about their sourcing from Bangladesh,” said Jenefa Jabbar, regional director of JC Penny, according to a garment association statement.

“Bangladesh government has laws, but there is no implementation of those laws. Buyers’ community wants to see credible action,” she was quoted as saying.

The retailers themselves are criticized by labor groups for allegedly shoveling blame and making token efforts to ensure worker safety.

A report by the AFL-CIO umbrella group of American unions published a day before the building collapse says retailers’ intermittent factory inspections and corporate social responsibility reports have failed, and hold “eerie parallels” with the financial self-regulation that helped precipitate the global financial crisis.

The Bangladesh government, however, may be the least willing of all to accept any responsibility.

“I am not worried,” Finance Minister Abul Maal Abdul Muhith said Friday. “These are individual cases of ... accidents. It happens everywhere.”

COLLAPSE IS DOWNPLAYED

Bangladesh’s finance minister downplayed the impact of last week’s factory-building collapse on his country’s garment industry, saying Friday he didn’t think it was “really serious.”

“The present difficulties ... well, I don’t think it is really serious – it’s an accident,” Abul Maal Abdul Muhith said. “And the steps that we have taken in order to make sure that it doesn’t happen, they are quite elaborate and I believe that it will be appreciated by all.”

The government made similar promises after a garment factory fire five months ago that killed 112, saying it would inspect factories for safety and pull the licenses of those that failed. However, that plan has yet to be implemented.

– Associated Press

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Gothamist
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Gothamist 05/04/13 - 05:05 pm
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Wow, I did not know

Wow, I did not know Bangladesh is a right to work state. Explains their dismal safety record. Rumor has it that some of Augustas textile executives have ties to this part of India! 500 hundred Dead this time, 112 in the factory Fire. Time for the American "buyers" to do the right thing and help improve the safety of the garment worker.

"A report by the AFL-CIO umbrella group of American unions published a day before the building collapse says retailers’ intermittent factory inspections and corporate social responsibility reports have failed, and hold “eerie parallels” with the financial self-regulation that helped precipitate the global financial crisis"

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