General Motors records its highest profit ever

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DETROIT — Just two years after it was rescued and reconstituted through bankruptcy and a government bailout, General Motors Co. cruised through 2011 to post the biggest profit in its history.

The 103-year-old company, leaner and smarter under new management, cut costs by taking advantage of its size around the globe. Also, its new products boosted sales so much that it has reclaimed the title of world’s biggest automaker from Toyota.

GM might have a hard time breaking this record in 2012 because it is losing money in Europe and South America, and U.S. sales growth slowed in the last three months of 2011.

The company’s performance in North America and Asia still helped it earn $7.6 billion for the year, beating the record of $6.7 billion set during the truck boom in 1997.

The profit won’t stop the debate about spending $49.5 billion in taxpayer dollars to save GM, but it did drive up the company’s stock price, which could help the government get more of its money back.

The bailout of GM and Chrysler Group LLC, begun by George W. Bush and finished by Barack Obama, remains a major issue in this year’s presidential campaign.

GM, which released its earnings Thursday, performed best in its home territory, posting a $7.2 billion pretax profit in North America. The numbers were so good that 47,500 blue-collar workers will get $7,000 profit-sharing checks, the maximum allowable under their new union contract.

International Operations, which includes Asia, made $1.9 billion before taxes, but that was down from 2010.

GM’s cost cuts, and its outlook for this year helped to push up the stock price by almost 9 percent to $27.08. The company said it trimmed costs by $500 million in the fourth quarter alone, mainly by consolidating advertising agencies and engineering operations.

A prediction that costs wouldn’t rise this year wowed investors, especially since other automakers have forecast rising costs, said Itay Michaeli, an analyst for Citi Investment Research.

GM also was optimistic about sales and revenue. It sees its global market share holding steady at 11.9 percent, and if global auto sales rise as expected this year, GM’s slice of that would also increase.

That’s especially promising, because GM managed to make money last year with industrywide sales in the U.S. at a historically low 12.8 million. Sales this year could rise to 14 million.

The company expects to charge more for its cars and trucks this year, but warned that the prices could be pressured as the market shifts toward smaller, less-expensive vehicles.

CEO Dan Akerson hinted at a better year for GM in 2012, saying that the company will build on the 2011 results as it brings more products into the market.

That’s good news for the U.S. government, which still owns 26.5 percent of the company and needs more strong earnings to push up the stock price.

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Craig Spinks
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Craig Spinks 02/16/12 - 07:55 pm
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Hopefully the auto industry

Hopefully the auto industry did not mistake temporary "mouth-to-mouth" resuscitation provided by the U.S. Treasury for a long-term hook-up to a ventilator bought by future generations of U.S. taxpayers.

KSL
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KSL 02/16/12 - 08:22 pm
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Pretty easy to have those

Pretty easy to have those high profits when you are taxpayer subsidized. I can't begin to tell you how many GM cars that have been bought by my family and my husband's family back through generations. I have been a satisfied Ford owner since 1997. I will never, ever buy another GM car!

KSL
151869
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KSL 02/16/12 - 08:23 pm
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So when is the government

So when is the government (we, the taxpayers) going to start being paid back?

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