New rules for lost bags, delays, bumping

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DALLAS --- The U.S. government is adding new protections for travelers when airlines lose their bags, bump them off flights or hold them on the runway for hours. The airlines will also have to more clearly disclose the fees they charge.

Consumer advocates say the wide-ranging regulations announced Wednesday would improve the flying experience. Still, they wanted regulators to get even tougher on bag fees and make it easier to sue airlines over shoddy service.

Beginning in late August, passengers who pay $15 or more to check luggage will get a refund if their bag is lost. They'll also be entitled to more money -- up to $1,330 -- if they're bumped from a flight. Airlines will have to include government taxes and fees in advertised prices.

Delayed international flights won't be allowed to sit on the tarmac for more than four hours, an extension of a year-old rule for domestic flights that greatly reduced three-hour delays.

Some advocates for the airline industry complained that the regulations could raise costs at a time when high fuel prices are threatening the airlines' bottom lines, but the CEO of American Airlines said he didn't see anything particularly alarming in the provisions.

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said the new regulations ensure that airlines treat travelers fairly.

"It's just common sense that if an airline loses your bag or you get bumped from a flight because it was oversold, you should be reimbursed," LaHood said.

Consumer advocates were generally pleased but suggested more could have been done.

Kate Hanni of FlyersRights.org said airlines should refund baggage fees when bags are late, not just when they're lost. And she favored a three-hour holding limit on international flights.

"But overall we're winning," Hanni said, and the new rule includes "a lot of good stuff, a lot of little things that will make people feel better about traveling."

Others said the verdict was mixed.

"These are all baby steps and they're good, but there's more that can be done without bringing the airline industry to its knees," said George Hobica, of airfarewatchdog.com.

Airlines said they're already doing many of the things the Transportation Department wants, including disclosing fees and reporting developing delays. They pointed to government statistics, which show fewer mishandled bags and fewer passengers being bumped from oversold flights.

Some consultants said the four-hour limit on tarmac delays for international flights would increase cancellations, and could leave stranded passengers waiting days for another flight.

Last year, airlines mishandled 2 million bags, although that includes damaged and delayed ones. Airlines bumped 65,000 passengers last year and another 681,000 took voluntary offers to give up their seats. Still, that's a fraction of 1 percent of all travelers.

AIRLINE passenger protections

The government is adding new protections beginning in late August. Changes include:

- Passengers who pay $15 or more to check luggage will get a refund if their bag is lost.

- Passengers bumped off oversold flights will be entitled to greater compensation -- up to $650 or $1,330, depending on how long a passenger waits for a makeup flight. The limits are currently $400 or $800.

- Airlines must prominently disclose on their Web sites all potential fees -- for checking bags, changing reservations, upgrading seats and so on.

- Airlines will also have to include taxes and government-imposed fees in the fares that they advertise. Airlines had argued that car dealers and other businesses don't have to do that.

- Delayed international flights won't be allowed to sit on the tarmac for more than four hours, an extension of a year-old rule for domestic flights that greatly reduced three-hour delays.

-- Associated Press


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