Freddie Mac seeks $10.6 billion more in aid

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WASHINGTON --- Freddie Mac is asking for $10.6 billion in additional federal aid after posting a big loss in the first three months of the year. It's another sign that the taxpayer bill for stabilizing the housing market will keep mounting.

The McLean, Va.-based mortgage finance company has been effectively owned by the government after nearly collapsing in September 2008. The new request will bring the total tab for rescuing Freddie Mac to $61.3 billion.

But the company's CEO, Charles Haldeman, said, "We are seeing some signs of stabilization in the housing market, including house prices and sales in some key geographic areas."

Freddie Mac set aside $5.4 billion to cover credit losses from bad mortgages, down from $7 billion in the final three months of last year.

Haldeman cautioned, however, that the housing market "remains fragile with historically high delinquency and foreclosure levels" and high unemployment.

Created by Congress, Freddie Mac and sibling company Fannie Mae buy mortgages from lenders and package them into bonds that are resold to global investors. As the housing bubble burst, they were unable to raise enough money to stay afloat, and the government effectively nationalized them.

Since then, Uncle Sam's share of the mortgage business has kept getting bigger. Government institutions -- mainly Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, the Federal Housing Administration and the Veterans Administration -- backed nearly 97 percent of home loans in the first quarter of 2010, according to trade publication Inside Mortgage Finance .

Late last year, the Obama administration pledged to cover unlimited losses through 2012 for Freddie and Fannie. Freddie's new request will bring the total taxpayer tab for both companies to about $136.5 billion.

Fannie Mae is expected to release earnings soon and may also request additional financial aid.

With the housing market still on shaky ground, Obama administration officials argue that it is still too early to draft any proposals to reform the two companies or the broader housing finance system.

But Republicans argue that the sweeping financial overhaul before Congress is incomplete without a plan for Fannie and Freddie.

Senate Republicans propose transforming Fannie and Freddie into private companies with no government subsidies, or to shut them down completely.

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speeding
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speeding 05/06/10 - 03:23 pm
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And I'll bet our FOOL

And I'll bet our FOOL president gives it to them.

apex24
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apex24 05/06/10 - 06:41 pm
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This is what happens when

This is what happens when Leftist Liberals are in power. Give me, give me, give me mentality.

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