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SRS aims to use retirees' wisdom

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AIKEN --- Hundreds of Savannah River Site retirees were told Tuesday that their help is needed to mentor thousands of new workers headed to SRS through federal stimulus funding.

"We are looking for your support," Chuck Muns, the president and CEO of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, told the crowd at the SRS Retiree Association's annual meeting at St. Angela Parish Hall in Aiken.

Mr. Muns, whose company is the site's main contractor, said that with the influx of new workers to fill as many as 3,000 jobs, a "safety culture" must be maintained at the site.

"They have to learn this culture," he said after the speech. "It's not easy work."

Mr. Muns said the retirees' knowledge could prove invaluable to new workers.

Mr. Muns also spoke in some detail about the site's plans for the $1.615 billion in stimulus money.

He said the money will be used for cleanup activities that ultimately will reduce the industrial area of the site by 40 percent by 2011.

He said that area could then become available for other projects, possibly focused on energy independence.

He said the work was originally planned for a decade from now, but with the stimulus money, "We now can speed it up."

Also at Tuesday's meeting were U.S. Reps. Joe Wilson and Paul Broun, both Republicans. They pledged to fight to provide the retirees with proper pension and retirement benefits. They also thanked the retirees for their involvement with SRS during the Cold War.

"You won the war against Soviet Russia," Dr. Broun told them.

Reach Preston Sparks at (803) 648-1395, ext. 110, or preston.sparks@augustachronicle.com.

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SCEagle Eye
852
Points
SCEagle Eye 04/15/09 - 09:52 am
0
0
So, if SRS retirees are

So, if SRS retirees are making money from the stimulus doesn't that defeat the goal of short-term jobs for others? This whole stimulus thing could well end up in fewer jobs in the mid-term at SRS and DOE doesn't seem to care about that. And, contractors will take a cut right off the top for administrative fees. This "stimulus" plan is starting to look misguided, right?

Tell it like it is
35
Points
Tell it like it is 04/15/09 - 11:50 am
0
0
pluto boy, your name says it.

pluto boy, your name says it. You must be from a different planet !!

EMAGUY
6
Points
EMAGUY 04/15/09 - 02:43 pm
0
0
Pluto Boy may be on to

Pluto Boy may be on to something. For example, if the 3,000 new jobs pay each worker $50,000/year, this uses only $375 million dollars. Where does the other $1.225 billion get used for? Additionally, this quick boost in job numbers (good for only 30 months) eats into work (and those jobs!) forecast to last for a very long period of time. In the end, fewer jobs will be available over the longer period of time if new programs aren't brought to the Site.

corgimom
26082
Points
corgimom 04/15/09 - 10:22 pm
0
0
Of the 3,000 workers, most of

Of the 3,000 workers, most of them will come from out-of-state. They are certified and trained, and will be contractors. When the job is done, they leave and go to the next site. Just like when they built Plant Vogtle. In all the news stories that talk about 3,000 jobs, they have never said "3,000 people from the CSRA will be hired".

stumpjumper
2
Points
stumpjumper 04/15/09 - 11:03 pm
0
0
I cannot believe they need

I cannot believe they need someone to teach them how to shuffle papers and look for something to do to make them look busy. Been there and know .................

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