Folks still fight Georgia's history

Truth is the daughter of time.

Francis Bacon

 

In Augusta, we’ve argued the past year over what to name a college. In Savannah, there’s debate over what to name a bridge.

The Savannah Morning News says many people are ready to change the name of the Eugene Talmadge Memorial Bridge – the majestic, 2-mile span over the Savannah River. The legislative delegation might take it up this week.

The debate over the bridge’s name has been around nearly a quarter-century and probably comes down to the fact that its namesake, former Gov. Gene Talmadge, isn’t from Savannah.

That doesn’t sit well with white traditionalists, and black folks, including Savannah Mayor Edna Jackson, despise Talmadge’s use of racial politics to get re-elected four times.

You know, Augusta had its own Talmadge memorial – the hospital built in the 1950s and associated with the medical college. The name was changed in 1976, and I don’t remember anyone being too upset.

Today, the old Talmadge building retains its name as part of Georgia Regents Medical Center, which includes buildings such as the medical office building, the Georgia Radiation Therapy Center, the specialized care center and the Children’s Hospital of Georgia.

 

SPEAKING OF GEORGIA: I was chided this month for not recognizing Georgia Day on Feb. 12. My apologies.

Let me make it up by sharing these Peach State insights offered by pupils in AAA’s Going Places magazine:

• “Georgia was founded by four fathers.”

• “Macon is in Georgia. May­be it is in north Georgia. May­be it is in south Georgia. I do not know. It takes all my knowing to know that Macon is in Georgia.”

• “People and population are not always the same. Just because Atlanta’s population is dense does not mean its people are.”

• “Early pioneers had many exciting times discovering strange places like Atlanta. What made it so strange to them was they had never seen things like tall buildings before.”

• “In the total state of Georgia are found such things as cotton, paper, peaches, clothing and clay. Keeping all this stuff separated is one of the main jobs of Georgiadonians.”

• “If the Altamaha River was straightened out, it would reach much farther. But we must cut government spending somewhere.”

 

TODAY’S JOKE: A cop on his beat noticed a parking meter with a paper sack over it upon which was written: “Broken.”

Skeptical, he removed the bag, inserted a quarter in the meter and turned the dial. It worked perfectly. As he began writing a parking ticket, the car’s owner rushed out of a nearby building.

“What are you doing?” he yelled after a quick glance at the meter. “There’s plenty of time left!”

More

Sun, 12/04/2016 - 20:05

Pardon our mess