Crews clearing out Savannah homeless camps

  • Follow News

SAVANNAH, Ga. — Crews are clearing out some homeless camps east of downtown Savannah.

The Savannah Morning News reports that the cleanup is a joint effort between the city, the Chatham-Savannah Authority for the Homeless and the Savannah Impact Program. It is being done with the help of volunteers.

Behind an area that workers cleared on Saturday, litter lined the wood line, which was still home to several tents and other structures. The structures were mostly devoid of occupants, who were told they needed to leave by July 12 so the area could be cleared to make way for construction staging for drainage projects.

Comments (24) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
nocnoc
57075
Points
nocnoc 07/23/14 - 08:45 am
13
3
How about using Savannah's example AUGUSTA?

There a few such camps downtown and under bridges and near the old Lowe's on Molly Pond Rd.

Sad as it is to say
Sometimes the solution to these reducing these problems is the application of the Bird Feeder Principle.

Less Feed, Less Birds, because when birds see a lack of food at a location, find another place to feed or start learning to feed themselves again.

Dixieman
20113
Points
Dixieman 07/23/14 - 09:09 am
13
2
How about this?

We could put them on a train to Guatemala, Honduras or El Salvador and see how they like it.
Seriously, these people have NO RIGHT to use the outdoors as their toilet, create public health menaces, harass passers-by, etc. They should be required to work for their handouts.

corgimom
45081
Points
corgimom 07/23/14 - 10:49 am
5
9
Dixieman, those people in

Dixieman, those people in those homeless camps are there for a REASON, they aren't able to work and function at a job.

Mental illness, drug and alcohol problems, personality disorders, sex offenders, ex-convicts.

Nobody would want to hire them and nobody would want to work with them.

It takes more skills than people realize to get and keep a job.

KSL
164368
Points
KSL 07/23/14 - 11:02 am
6
2
I agree noc and Dixie. To a

I agree noc and Dixie. To a great degree they are being enabled.

Fiat_Lux
17978
Points
Fiat_Lux 07/23/14 - 12:45 pm
8
1
We need our institutions back

When the liberals, in their limitless wisdom and god-like insight, enacted the wholesale closure of virtually all public mental institutions, those who were turned out did not in fact continue to show up for the medications nor even for their state-provided beds. Rather, they by and large headed out into the great, wide world on their own, with their families left trying to help them stay safe and alive, often without much success.

Yes, kiddies, one way or another, these camps mostly now are the result of our wonderful government helping us live better lives.

dichotomy
42068
Points
dichotomy 07/23/14 - 12:51 pm
7
2
"those people in those

"those people in those homeless camps are there for a REASON, they aren't able to work and function at a job."

More like they are there by CHOICE and refuse to even try to work or function at a job. Alcohol and drugs are not a REASON. They simply choose to be vermin. Yes, some are mentally ill and should be institutionalized. The drunks and drug addicts should be cut off from ALL aid and enablement and be forced to learn that the virtue of being sober and working is EATING regularly. Otherwise, I don't care if they starve to death laying in a pile of bushes somewhere pumped up on their stimulant or depressant of choice. Good riddance. For all intents and purposes they are dead already but still consuming resources.

We've got enough resource leeches already in this country and are importing more every day from Mexico and South America. Quit feeding ALL of them, foreign and domestic, and you would see the unemployment rate drop dramatically...and that sucking wind you would feel would be a lot of Mexicans and South Americans voluntarily deporting themselves back across the border. And the birth rate of bastard children would drop rapidly too.

The biggest problem in this country is that we reward people who are not doing what they should be doing. There is always a bunch of bleeding heart liberals wanting to give them a "helping hand", using MY money, when what they really need is a swift kick in the arse.

We've been told for over 50 years that social welfare programs would improve things. THEY HAVE NOT. WE'VE SPENT TRILLIONS. THINGS ARE WORSE. We have the dumbest, laziest, most worthless population in our history. We have "liberaled" and "it's for the children" ourselves to the point where half of the country is providing either TOTAL LIFE SUPORT or significantly SUBSIDIZING the other half of the country. I say it's time to reopen the mental institutions, build more prisons, and expand the pauper's cemeteries.

Work and contribute, be locked up, or starve. Your CHOICE. I am tired of being guilted into supporting your lame behinds.

Fiat_Lux
17978
Points
Fiat_Lux 07/23/14 - 02:14 pm
6
1
Agree about the social welfare/entitlement programs

Dumping the mentally ill and the borderline functional on the public was part and parcel of that social welfare public policy initiative.

corgimom
45081
Points
corgimom 07/23/14 - 03:43 pm
2
11
Ronald Reagan called for the

Ronald Reagan called for the closing of mental hospitals, just like he closed the ones in California.

To suggest that it was a "liberal policy" just isn't true.

corgimom
45081
Points
corgimom 07/23/14 - 04:18 pm
5
7
myfather, your understanding

myfather, your understanding and compassion for people that are mentally ill is truly something. It's something, alright.

Nobody chooses to be mentally ill. Ever.

You think that all mentally ill people should be institutionalized, when they don't present a danger to themselves or others?

You know, like totally ignore their Constitutional rights, and incarcerate them until they die, just because they have the misfortune to be ill even though they are not violent?

How about veterans, that are homeless because they have PTSD from their military service, you think that they should be institutionalized, too?

Mentally ill people are resource leeches? Really? But if they were institutionalized, then they wouldn't be, even though it would cost far more to institutionalize them?

We "reward" mentally ill people?

We have a homeless camp not too far from us, since we are near the Catawba River. And you see them walking up and down very busy roads, carrying on conversations with the voices in their heads. All they do is walk up and down the road, all day long, in all kinds of weather. They don't bother anybody. They aren't violent, they just want to be left alone. We have a convenience store, a Walmart, a McDonald's, a Chick Fil A and an ABC store, everything they need is right there.

And then we have the Federal housing project residents that live across the road.

Given a choice between the homeless and the "residents", I'll take the homeless any time. We didn't need to install an alarm for the homeless people, we had to install one for the "residents" across the way, because they think our housing development should be their source of income from stealing.

Do you understand that a whole lot of the homeless alcoholics and drug addicts are actually mentally ill, and they are self-medicating? And you think they are vermin?

Those are some interesting concepts, alright.

AutumnLeaves
11223
Points
AutumnLeaves 07/23/14 - 04:49 pm
7
4
There is a reason for the old

There is a reason for the old saying, "Never say, never..." corgimom. SOMETIMES people DO choose to become mentally ill. And sometimes they choose NOT to be. Have you ever considered not making so many sweeping generalizations? I understand what you're saying other than that, but still....

SRD
493
Points
SRD 07/23/14 - 05:41 pm
3
3
Compassion

Where is the compassion? It's hard to believe that their are so many unfeeling people out there. Most of these homeless people are mentally ill, veterans, and people who have lost everything and have reason to be mentally ill. I have been to the Golden Harvest food bank handing out clothing and talking to many people who have nowhere to go, no help, and see no way out of their current situation. Remember you reap what you sew and we will all face our Lord one day. What would he say to you? Were you compassionate? Did you do anything other than complain? I challenge all of those who sit here with a hateful, holier-than-thou attitude to get up and defend those who are defenseless and show a little heart!

truthsetmfree
106
Points
truthsetmfree 07/23/14 - 05:50 pm
7
0
homeless

I work and deal with the homeless every day of the week. Most of them get a check from the government, for disability or military service. Most of them are capable of doing some kind of work but choose not to. A large majority of them could have an apartment but they choose not too. The life they live in the largest majority of cases are the way the CHOOSE to live. They don't want the responsibility of a home, or a relationship with families. They are in most cases nice people who could function quite well in everyday life if they so choose to. But they choose to eat free by traveling the soup kitchen circuit everyday, or doing odd jobs around downtown stores to pick up a couple of dollars for cigarettes after their checks run out. They government should start evaluating these folks and the ones who are capable should be helped back into the work place and off the free money roll. This of course does not apply to the Military retirees. These are the ones that have the mental problems and such. They should be housed in government care facilities for life for the sacrifices they made for this country.

KSL
164368
Points
KSL 07/23/14 - 05:57 pm
5
2
How come we didn't have a

How come we didn't have a whole bunch of homeless veterans after WW2?

KSL
164368
Points
KSL 07/23/14 - 06:15 pm
3
1
Thanks truth for your

Thanks truth for your insight.

allhans
25528
Points
allhans 07/23/14 - 09:42 pm
3
0
I realize that we are to be

I realize that we are to be our brothers keepers but does this have to be for a certain element and not all. I'll bet many of them have a trade of some sort and could repay their brothers with little chores.

corgimom
45081
Points
corgimom 07/23/14 - 10:25 pm
0
6
Autumn Leaves, I have never

Autumn Leaves, I have never met anybody that chooses to be mentally ill. What an odd thing to say. Nobody would ever choose that. What mental illnesses do people choose to have?

People choose to get better from mental illness every day; they go to their doctors, their therapists, they take their medication. But there are people out there that are so ill, they can't even manage that. Mentally ill people aren't good at handling things like doctors appointments, managing their medication so they don't run out, arranging transportation ahead of time. That's part of their illness.

There is far more mental illness in this country than people realize. And most of them don't get the treatment they need, there aren't enough doctors or therapists or treatment facilities.

As for "why weren't there homeless veterans after WWII"- there were. They were called hobos or bums, and they lived in hobo camps. They were all over the country. It's not a new problem. It was called "shell shock" or "battle fatigue" in those days instead of PTSD.

People who are healthy and well-adjusted don't want to live on the streets. It's a terrible, stressful life, and it's very dangerous.

It takes a lot more skills than people think to get up and go to work every day, and maintain their lives and their homes. And there are people out there that just can't do it.

And an employer requires more than people think. You have to have social skills. You have to be able to get along with people. You have to be able to manage anger and frustration. It takes planning skills to manage your life around your work. It takes planning skills, and the ability to think ahead, to get to work on time every day. You have to be able to relate to people, to handle the people along with your work assignments. They have to be able to work under pressure, to work under deadlines, to organize their work to get it done. They have to be able to take orders from people, and respect authority. They have to be organized, and be able to follow procedures, and have judgment.

People that are healthy take those "soft" skills for granted. But for some, they just can't handle it.

As I've said on here before, my mother suffered from mental illness. She was so sick that she thought that nothing was wrong with her (which is the way that significantly mentally ill people think), although it was clearly obvious to all around her. I still, to this day, have people in my hometown, talk to me about her- and she died 25 years ago.

My mom worked for awhile as a paraprofessional for the school district. But her behavioral problems soon surfaced, because she could only keep things going for so long, and they dropped her. Until the day that she died, she had no idea why she didn't work any more.

All of those "nice people"- they can hold it together for awhile. They can hold it together to deal with somebody in an office, especially if it's something that they need, for a short time. But for 40 hours a week, 5 days a week, week in and week out- they just can't do it. Their illness gets in the way.

They are on disability for a reason, you know? They didn't just get up one morning, pop into an office, and come out with a check.

Allhans, as for "little chores", do you know of anybody that would entrust their business that they spent years building, entrust expensive equipment and their business reputation, so that they could hire a mentally ill person? Why would they do that, when there are healthy people that they could get just as easily?

deestafford
38795
Points
deestafford 07/23/14 - 11:51 pm
7
0
cogi, The deinstitutionalism started not under Reagan..

cogi, The dinstitutionalism started not under Reagan but under Jimmy Carter. He even had his wife as the chairperson of the study committee and found out he could not do that so he made her the honorary chair.

This was a follow on effort he had executed when he was governor of GA in which his wife was the lead person.

Looking at mental health started with JFK in 1963 because of his sister's mental problems.

So, it was JC and not RR whom was the driver of getting people out of MH facilities.

corgimom
45081
Points
corgimom 07/24/14 - 12:15 am
0
6
Dee Stafford, in 1973, Ronald

Dee Stafford, in 1973, Ronald Reagan, Governor of California, announced his intention of closing all 14 California mental hospitals by 1977, with the exception of two that were to be used for criminal offenders.

The Carters pushed for more mental health facilities and more treatment; Ronald Reagan just wanted to shut the hospitals down to save money. And it was widely discussed that he would save money in the short run, but that in the long run, there would be a painful, expensive reckoning.

And that's just what has happened in the US. Penny wise, and pound foolish.

They closed the hospitals to save money- and now have a huge, expensive homeless problem, not to mention the schizophrenics that go out and shoot innocent people.

WilliamRD77
9
Points
WilliamRD77 07/24/14 - 12:17 am
5
0
Reagan called for closing of institutions

WRONG!!! We need to get politics out of this debate because it is the children who are suffering the most. There are families out there living in tents and cars. How do you think these children will fare later on in life? As far as those with mental health problems, deinstitutionalization started in the late l950's/early 1960's when psychotropic drugs were discovered to treat mental illness and many in institutions were returned to their families/communities and did well receiving outpatient treatment at regional facilities (Augusta Area Mental Health behind University Hospital and Georgia Regional on Highway 56 instead of going to Central State). Those with severe problems who did not respond to drug treatment remained in institutions until President Carter pushed further deinstitutionalization. (This group predominate the homeless population that consists of those with mental health problems.) Civil rights extended to those individuals based on treatment in the least restrictive setting allowed them the right to refuse treatment /medications unless they are a "threat to themselves and others". Under President Carter, the focus was on placing them in community resources if families were not available, as well as the right to petition the courts for their release from long term institutionalization. Our prisons are full of those with untreated serious mental health problems. But these individuals are "out of sight".
The "new homeless" (families) we see is a result of the poor economy that has produced more low paying jobs than middle to high paying jobs (under Reagan the economic recovery resulted in more good paying jobs than poor paying jobs). Doubling in gas prices contributing to increase in the prices of commodities also affect a person's ability to pay for shelter. The cultural shift to single parenting has also contributed to increased homelessness. Children are the ones who suffer when single teens decide to have a baby to meet some emotional need they have. A failure of the VA to treat PTSD of returning vets is another reason.
As a social worker for over 35 years, I have dealt with the homeless population. It is the children who are hurt and traumatized the most. They get behind in school; lack good nutrition; observe street violence and are often victims of violence. There are many homeless shelters/programs in Augusta that work with these families to get their lives together. I encourage you to find one and support it financially. Government does little to provide housing for the homeless.
P Dixon. MSW

nocnoc
57075
Points
nocnoc 07/24/14 - 07:16 am
7
0
 


Reagan never emptied out the Mental wards.
The ACLU brought a case to the US Supreme court and won
against state FORCED medication and observation without a court hearing.

Last time I checked the ACLU was not in bed with Reagan.

LillyfromtheMills
15042
Points
LillyfromtheMills 07/24/14 - 09:00 am
5
0
We have told Corgi

a hundred times that it was not Reagan and it was due to the ACLU, etc but she won't believe it.

deestafford
38795
Points
deestafford 07/24/14 - 09:18 am
1
0
The ACLU was started by admitted socialists and ....

The ACLU was started by admitted socialists and communist sympathizers. SC Justice Ginsburg was an official and a lawyer and dyed-in-the wool bedfellow with the ACLU and its goals and agenda.

deestafford
38795
Points
deestafford 07/24/14 - 09:29 am
0
0
Two things that would go a long way...

Two things that would go a long way toward solving the homeless and mental ill situations are forced medication and force institutionalization for the mentally ill. We can't expect people who are mentally incapable of taking care of themselves being nothing but detriments to themselves and society if they are allowed to roam freely as long as they have certain levels of mental illnesses.

As far as the homeless and deprived child situation is concerned the answer is very simple...bring back state and charity run orphanages. We need to get rid of the gag reflex the left portrays of orphanages being those out of a Charles Dickinson novel rather than those like the highly successful Bethesda Orphanage for Boys in Savannah.

There are some wonderful orphanages in the country that produce children who children who are ready to succeed and have thousands have been highly successful in life.

No only would these be for homeless children but it could be for deprived children who are living in the squalor of poverty and mistreatment. It would also be a place a struggling mother could put her child whom she could not adequately support and wanted to give them a better life than she could offer.

Of course, the left comes ungluded whenever this superb idea is put forth.

AutumnLeaves
11223
Points
AutumnLeaves 07/25/14 - 04:42 pm
0
0
Corgimom, just because you

Corgimom, just because you don't know anyone that has jumped off a bridge doesn't mean people never choose to jump off a bridge, ever. My father was a professional in fields that dealt with mental illness. I have no idea of any qualifications you have other than your personal observation to jump to the conclusion that people never choose to be mentally ill, ever, but I'll believe my father's professional observation over your personal one any day.

Back to Top
loading...
Top headlines

Pearl the obese dog gradually losing weight

After six months in the care of DNA rescue and through a careful rehabilitation program, Pearl has lost 15.7 pounds, down from the 76.5 she weighed when she was found as a stray on Kensington ...
Search Augusta jobs