2 Civil War museums in US team up for new center

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RICHMOND, Va. — One museum has among its vast Confederate-centric collection Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson’s sword and the flag that flew at Robert E. Lee’s headquarters. The other museum strives to tell the story of the American Civil War through the eyes of Northerners and Southerners, freed and enslaved blacks, soldiers and civilians.

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Christy Coleman, of the American Civil War Center, and Waite Rawls, of the Museum of the Confederacy, will be CEOs of a new museum combining the two collections at the Tredegar Ironworks in Richmond, Va.  STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
STEVE HELBER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Christy Coleman, of the American Civil War Center, and Waite Rawls, of the Museum of the Confederacy, will be CEOs of a new museum combining the two collections at the Tredegar Ironworks in Richmond, Va.

Now the Museum of the Confederacy and the American Civil War Center are joining forces to build a $30 million museum in Richmond with the goal of creating the top Civil War museum in the nation 150 years after the deadliest conflict ever fought on U.S. soil from 1861-65 between the Northern states and the secessionist Southern states.

The marriage of museums will meld the collection of Confederate battle flags, uniforms, weapons and other historic relics with a narrative-based museum that uses bold, interactive exhibits and living history events to relate its 360-degree telling of the war.

What some might view as an unlikely partnership “makes so much sense” to Christy Coleman, the president of the American Civil War Center, which opened in 2000 at a site where the new museum will rise.

“That’s part of the point,” Coleman said. “They have an incredible collection that is absolutely Confederate strong, but there are a lot of artifacts that have not been able to be fully explored or used to relate to the African-American experience or immigrants or the role of Jews.”

Coleman said the Confederacy museum’s collection will complement her museum’s mission of looking at the social and political stories of the Civil War. “The combination of that is what makes this so exciting to us.”

In a joint announcement, the museums said the new historic attraction in the former capital of the secessionist Confederacy has yet to be named, but $20 million has been committed to its construction. Ground will be broken in 2014, with an expected opening the following year.

The new museum will be located along the James River, at the Tredegar Ironworks, where much of the South’s cannons were forged during the war. It’s also the home of the Civil War Center. The museums said bringing together both institutions will “further establish Richmond as the foremost Civil War destination in the United States.”

Richmond continues to draw from its past to bring tourists to the city. Efforts include the creation of a Slave Trail tracing the city’s past as a lucrative center in the commerce of enslaved people to a more contemporary narrative offering tours that highlight the Thomas Jefferson-designed Capitol and locations in central Virginia used in Steven Spielberg’s film Lincoln.

At the new attraction, Coleman will share the title of CEO with Waite Rawls, the president of the Confederacy museum. It dates to 1890 and traces the origins of much of its collections to the men who fought for the South and their descendants, in particular Lee and other Southern military leaders. The
museums have collaborated in the past. Rawls said the merger is “a natural evolution of that relationship.”

The Museum of the Confederacy claims the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of Confederate artifacts: thousands of carefully preserved battle flags, dolls used to smuggle medicine to troops, Jackson’s sword. Only a fraction of the collection is on display at the downtown Richmond site, next to the former White House of the Confederacy.

Though the Civil War Sesquicentennial has drawn visitors to the museum, overall it has seen a sharp decline in attendance through the years as the Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center and related facilities have grown around it, enveloping both buildings. Finding the museum can be a challenge even for city residents.

The James River location for the new attraction, a little more than a mile from Mu­seum of the Confederacy, offers a more expansive and accessible site. It’s home to the Na­tional Park Service’s Richmond Visitor Cen­ter and already is a popular destination for Civil War buffs. Concerts and other events also draw city-dwellers and tourists to the grassy grounds along the river.


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