Who is your car?

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WHO IS YOUR CAR?

Recently we asked readers of The Augusta Chronicle to tell us any nicknames they have given their vehicles over the years. Here are the first two readers to reply:

Gerald Byrd, of Augusta: “I bought a 1973 Plymouth Duster new. It was baby blue. My parents actually bought it for me. We kept it and handed it down to my sister. The muffler was rotted out so we put on a Thrush muffler, which made it sound like a school bus. So it was caleed the Blue Goose because it sounded like an old honker. It was the only car my family has ever named.”

Byrd said he once owned a 1971 Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu 350 that he bought from the original owner. It was white with a black vinyl top and black interior. The two-door hardtop was loaded, with power drum brakes, power steering and air conditioning.

“We called it the Wild Eagle because of my name, Byrd,” he said. “I even put that on a license plate in front.”

David Anderson, of Canton, Ga.: “I have actually never named any vehicle I have owned, but I have had others name them for me, and the names seem to have stuck.

“The first was a 1987 Chevrolet Astro Van, two-tone dark metallic blue over gold. It was the Sport Two Tone so only the area at the bottom of the sides below the side trim was gold. The first day that I drove it into work, one of my co-workers, who was obviously smitten with Vanna White, of Wheel of Fortune fame, took one look and christened it Vanna Blue. The Blue was eventually dropped, but it was always known as Vanna.

“The second was the vehicle I just traded out of, a 1996 Chevrolet Suburban, all white. She never really explained to me the reasoning behind it, but my oldest daughter who was 16 at the time immediately christened it Herbie.

“ ‘It just looks like a Herbie!’ she said. She was big on naming her own cars, and the first vehicle she drove, a 1993 Chevrolet S-10, was called Small Fry, simply because it was so much smaller than the Suburban. I eventually started referring to the Suburban as The Great White because of its size and all of the battle scars it proudly wore during its 17 years and nearly 220,000 miles of service!”

– Glynn Moore, staff writer


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