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Masters guests opt for comfortable fashions on the course

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Cool and comfortable attire has largely replaced the once ubiquitous sundress worn by women at the Masters Tournament.

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Cathy Tucker, of Aiken, shows off the colorful wedges she wore to the practice rounds of the 2013 Masters Tournament.  EMILY ROSE BENNETT/STAFF
EMILY ROSE BENNETT/STAFF
Cathy Tucker, of Aiken, shows off the colorful wedges she wore to the practice rounds of the 2013 Masters Tournament.

The grounds of Augusta National Golf Club were teeming with bright colors Tuesday. Most women and men wore cotton, khaki shorts and collared shirts.

“Less sundresses, more traditional golf attire,” said Amy Roberts, of Venice, Fla.

Donning a light blue, sleeveless sundress patterned with seahorses by designer Lilly Pulitzer, Roberts thought she was a rare sight wearing a dress instead of shorts.

Pulitzer, who became popular in the 1960s for designing colorful, tropical patterned women’s clothing, died Sunday.

“I was so devastated to learn she had passed away,” Roberts said. “I just wore it in tribute.”

Leslie Hixon, of Augusta, wore white shorts with a black, collared Masters shirt. Having attended the golf tournament for several years, she learned to prioritize practical attire over style.

“I go for comfort,” she said.

Wearing comfortable clothing does not mean sacrificing fashion trends, said Emily Hedrick, of Atlanta, who dressed in a J.Crew cotton skirt and light colored T-shirt.

Hedrick brought a cardigan sweater to layer over her outfit during the cooler morning temperatures.

Kathleen Rolison, of Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., lamented the demise of sundresses. She wore an orange, cotton dress with a wedge-heeled sandal that was comfortable for walking the course.

“I chose something that was cool for the weather but stylish,” Rolison said.


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