Deal's budget doesn't restore cuts to education

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Deal  David Tulis
David Tulis
Deal

ATLANTA — Georgia schools would see a modest financial boost under a budget Republican Gov. Na­than Deal proposed last week, though they would not recoup more than
$1 billion in state funding lost over the past few years.

Deal made education funding a key part of his State of the State address to lawmakers, calling schools the “front line in our effort to create prosperity.” He promised $258 million to help cover growth in enrollment in the state’s K-12 and higher education systems. His plan also contained nearly $56 million to fund regularly scheduled raises for teachers.

Education officials, many of whom are still examining Deal’s proposals, said they were relieved to see the end of the deep funding cuts common during the recession.

If Deal is trying to gradually dig the school system out of a financial hole, schools still have a long climb.

Georgia is supposed to use a standardized formula to determine how much funding schools get from the state. In the current fiscal year, Deal and lawmakers opted to give the K-12 education system more than $1.1 billion less than what’s recommended in the formula, according to the state Department of Education.

“The bottom line is, because of the recession the state is still only sending local systems about 80 percent of what the formula calls for,” said Herb Garrett, the executive director of the Georgia School Superintendents Association.

Rep. Larry O’Neal, the Republican House leader, said he was glad to see Deal propose gradually raising spending on education. O’Neal said he worried that weak schools could prove a deterrent to attracting businesses to Georgia.

“As far as restoring the cuts, there’s not much to restore in the sense that most of the money would have really gone to personnel,” O’Neal said. “And you can’t really restore personnel that could have been here three years ago. You can have personnel going forward to do a better job, and that’s what this governor is trying to do.”

Another of Deal’s education goals comes at a price. His budget would increase the school calendar by 10 days for children enrolled in state-funded pre-kindergarten classes, restoring half of the days he cut last year to help the program stay afloat. Deal would help pay for the extra days by cutting slots for 2,000 pre-K students.

Deal’s proposal also contains money for new programs, including $1.6 million for a mentoring program meant to help students read at their grade level and funding for 400 new medical residency slots.

Verdaillia Turner, president of the Georgia Federation of Teachers, described Deal’s budget proposal as a mixed bag for educators.

She credited Deal with restoring $3.7 million in funding for school nurses, but said it wasn’t enough to make up for past cuts.

“It’s a good-faith effort,” she said. “I’m glad to see the governor values that we do have school nurses in the state. But God knows it’s far from what we really need.”

Turner was more critical of Deal’s proposal to give charter schools $9 million after a Georgia Supreme Court ruling put those schools at risk of losing half their funding. Her public teachers’ association considers those schools an expensive but unproven experiment.

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Little Lamb
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Little Lamb 01/16/12 - 01:35 pm
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Gov. Nathan Deal said: . . .

Gov. Nathan Deal said:

. . . schools are the “front line in our effort to create prosperity.”

In today's public education system students are taught wealth envy, class warfare, an emphasis on racial differences rather than our common humanity, an entitlement mindset, and a blind allegiance to government action. Today's public schools teach that free enterprise is exploitative and that government is benevolent. Those lessons will not create prosperity except for those who go into government for a career.

RCTeacher
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RCTeacher 01/16/12 - 03:24 pm
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I couldn’t disagree with you

I couldn’t disagree with you more. I am a former small business owner and current Business teacher in Richmond County. The majority of the schools in Richmond County have the small business development pathway which consists of introductory business classes, entrepreneurship classes and legal environment of business classes. In our classes we stress the importance of capitalism and a free-market economy. We study successful businesses and entrepreneurs. We write business plans, put budgets together, build websites, develop marketing plans, and explore careers. Our kids are out in the community interning, job-shadowing and making real world connections. I encourage you to get involved and see for yourself. You are more than welcome to come observe my class anytime.

RCTeacher
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RCTeacher 01/16/12 - 03:26 pm
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I couldn’t disagree with you

I couldn’t disagree with you more. I am a former small business owner and current Business teacher in Richmond County. The majority of the schools in Richmond County have the small business development pathway which consists of introductory business classes, entrepreneurship classes and legal environment of business classes. In our classes we stress the importance of capitalism and a free-market economy. We study successful businesses and entrepreneurs. We write business plans, put budgets together, build websites, develop marketing plans, and explore careers. Our kids are out in the community job-shadowing and making real world connections. I encourage you to get involved and see for yourself. You are more than welcome to come observe my class anytime.

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