Congress clears health care bill

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WASHINGTON --- Summoned to success by President Barack Obama, the Democratic-controlled Congress approved historic legislation Sunday night extending health care to tens of millions of uninsured Americans and cracking down on insurance company abuses, a climactic chapter in the century-long quest for near universal coverage.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, of California, walks across to the U.S. Capitol with Congressional Democrats as the House prepares to vote on health care reform.  Charles Dharapak/Associated Press
Charles Dharapak/Associated Press
Speaker Nancy Pelosi, of California, walks across to the U.S. Capitol with Congressional Democrats as the House prepares to vote on health care reform.

"This is what change looks like," Obama said a few moments later in televised remarks that stirred memories of his 2008 campaign promise of "change we can believe in."

Widely viewed as dead two months ago, the Senate-passed bill cleared the House on a 219-212 vote. Republicans were unanimous in opposition, joined by 34 dissident Democrats.

A second, smaller measure - making changes in the first - cleared the House shortly before midnight and was sent to the Senate, where Democratic leaders said they had the votes necessary to pass it quickly. The vote was 220-211.
Obama's young presidency received a badly needed boost as a deeply divided Congress passed legislation touching the lives of nearly every American. The battle for the future of the health insurance system - affecting one-sixth of the economy - galvanized Republicans and conservative activists looking ahead to November's midterm elections.

Far beyond the political ramifications - a concern the president repeatedly insisted he paid no mind - were the sweeping changes the bill held in store for Americans, insured or not, as well as the insurance industry and health care providers that face either smaller than anticipated payments from Medicare or higher taxes.

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said the legislation awaiting the president's approval would extend coverage to 32 million Americans who lack it, ban insurers from denying coverage on the basis of pre-existing medical conditions and cut deficits by an estimated $138 billion over a decade. If realized, the expansion of coverage would include 95 percent of all eligible individuals under age 65.

For the first time, most Americans would be required to purchase insurance, and face penalties if they refused. Much of the money in the bill would be devoted to subsidies to help families at incomes of up to $88,000 a year pay their premiums.

The second measure, which House Democrats demanded before agreeing to approve the first, included enough money to close a gap in the Medicare prescription drug coverage over the next decade, starting with an election-season rebate of $250 later this year for seniors facing high costs.

Much of the cost would be covered by the pharmaceutical industry, which made a deal months ago with the White House in which it pledged to spend lavishly on television ads to help pass the bill.

It also included sweeping changes in the student loan program, an administration priority that has been stalled in the Senate for months. It would have the government originate all student loans, denying banks and other private lenders of a lucrative business they have long had. Much of the savings would go into increased Pell Grants for needy college students, but black and Hispanic colleges would also benefit.

For the president, the events capped an 18-day stretch in which he traveled to four states and lobbied more than 60 wavering lawmakers in person or by phone to secure passage of his signature domestic issue. According to some who met with him, he warned that the bill's demise could cripple his still-young presidency, and his aides hoped to use the victory on health care as a springboard to success on bills to tackle stubbornly high unemployment that threatens Democratic prospects in the fall.

Obama watched the vote in the White House's Roosevelt Room with Vice President Joe Biden and dozens of aides, exchanged high fives with Rahm Emanuel, his chief of staff, and then telephoned Speaker Nancy Pelosi with congratulations.

"We proved that we are still a people capable of doing big things," he said later in the White House East Room. "We proved that this government - a government of the people and by the people - still works for the people.

Crowds of protesters outside the Capitol shouted "just vote no" in a futile attempt to stop the inevitable taking place inside a House packed with lawmakers and ringed with spectators in the galleries above.

Across hours of debate, House Democrats predicted the larger of the two bills, costing $940 billion over a decade, would rank with other great social legislation of recent decades.

"We will be joining those who established Social Security, Medicare and now, tonight, health care for all Americans, said Pelosi, D-Calif., partner to Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., in the grueling campaign to pass the legislation.

"This is the civil rights act of the 21st century," added Rep. Jim Clyburn of South Carolina, the top-ranking black member of the House.

Republicans readily agreed the bill would affect everyone in America, but warned repeatedly of the burden imposed by more than $900 billion in tax increases and Medicare cuts combined.

"We have failed to listen to America," said Rep. John Boehner of Ohio, leader of a party that has vowed to carry the fight into the fall's midterm elections for control of Congress.

The final obstacle to the bill's passage was cleared at mid-afternoon when Obama and Democratic leaders reached a compromise with anti-abortion lawmakers whose rebellion had left the outcome in doubt. The White House announced the president would issue an executive order pledging that no federal funds would be used for elective abortion, satisfying Rep. Bart Stupak of Michigan and a handful of like-minded lawmakers.

A spokesman for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops expressed skepticism that the presidential order would satisfy the church's objections.

Republican abortion foes also said Obama's proposed order was insufficient, and when Stupak sought to counter them, a shout of "baby killer" could be heard coming from the Republican side of the chamber.

The measure would also usher in a significant expansion of Medicaid, the federal-state health care program for the poor. Coverage would be required for incomes up to 133 percent of the federal poverty level, $29,327 a year for a family of four. Childless adults would be covered for the first time, starting in 2014.

The insurance industry, which spent millions on advertising trying to block the bill, would come under new federal regulation. They would be forbidden from placing lifetime dollar limits on policies, from denying coverage to children because of pre-existing conditions and from canceling policies when a policyholder becomes ill.
Parents would be able to keep children up to age 26 on their family insurance plans, three years longer than is now the case.

A new high-risk pool would offer coverage to uninsured people with medical problems until 2014, when the coverage expansion would go into high gear.

Obama has said often that presidents of both parties have tried without success to achieve national health insurance, beginning with Theodore Roosevelt early in the 20th century.

The 44th president's quest to succeed where others have failed seemed at a dead end two months ago, when Republicans won a special election for a Massachusetts Senate seat, and with it, the votes to prevent a final vote.
But the White House, Pelosi and Reid soon came up with a rescue plan that required the House to approve the Senate-passed measure despite opposition to many of its provisions, then have both houses pass a fix-it measure incorporating numerous changes.

To pay for the changes, the legislation includes more than $400 billion in higher taxes over a decade, roughly half of it from a new Medicare payroll tax on individuals with incomes over $200,000 and couples over $250,000. A new excise tax on high-cost insurance policies was significantly scaled back in deference to complaints from organized labor.

In addition, the bills cut more than $500 billion from planned payments to hospitals, nursing homes, hospices and other providers that treat Medicare patients. An estimated $200 billion would reduce planned subsidies to insurance companies that offer a private alternative to traditional Medicare.

The insurance industry warned that seniors would face sharply higher premiums as a result, and the Congressional Budget Office said many would return to traditional Medicare as a result.

The subsidies are higher than those for seniors on traditional Medicare, a difference that critics complain is wasteful, but insurance industry officials argue goes into expanded benefits.

The President's Response

President Barack Obama's remarks on health care overhaul, delivered Sunday after the House passed the legislation:

Good evening, everybody. Tonight, after nearly 100 years of talk and frustration, after decades of trying, and a year of sustained effort and debate, the United States Congress finally declared that America's workers and America's families and America's small businesses deserve the security of knowing that here, in this country, neither illness nor accident should endanger the dreams they've worked a lifetime to achieve.

Tonight, at a time when the pundits said it was no longer possible, we rose above the weight of our politics. We pushed back on the undue influence of special interests. We didn't give in to mistrust or to cynicism or to fear.

Instead, we proved that we are still a people capable of doing big things and tackling our biggest challenges. We proved that this government - a government of the people and by the people - still works for the people.
I want to thank every member of Congress who stood up tonight with courage and conviction to make health care reform a reality. And I know this wasn't an easy vote for a lot of people. But it was the right vote. I want to thank Speaker Nancy Pelosi for her extraordinary leadership, and Majority Leader Steny Hoyer and Majority Whip Jim Clyburn for their commitment to getting the job done. I want to thank my outstanding Vice President, Joe Biden, and my wonderful Secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sebelius, for their fantastic work on this issue. I want to thank the many staffers in Congress, and my own incredible staff in the White House, who have worked tirelessly over the past year with Americans of all walks of life to forge a reform package finally worthy of the people we were sent here to serve.

Today's vote answers the dreams of so many who have fought for this reform. To every unsung American who took the time to sit down and write a letter or type out an e-mail hoping your voice would be heard - it has been heard tonight. To the untold numbers who knocked on doors and made phone calls, who organized and mobilized out of a firm conviction that change in this country comes not from the top down, but from the bottom up - let me reaffirm that conviction: This moment is possible because of you.

Most importantly, today's vote answers the prayers of every American who has hoped deeply for something to be done about a health care system that works for insurance companies, but not for ordinary people. For most Americans, this debate has never been about abstractions, the fight between right and left, Republican and Democrat - it's always been about something far more personal. It's about every American who knows the shock of opening an envelope to see that their premiums just shot up again when times are already tough enough. It's about every parent who knows the desperation of trying to cover a child with a chronic illness only to be told "no" again and again and again. It's about every small business owner forced to choose between insuring employees and staying open for business. They are why we committed ourselves to this cause.

Tonight's vote is not a victory for any one party - it's a victory for them. It's a victory for the American people. And it's a victory for common sense.

Now, it probably goes without saying that tonight's vote will give rise to a frenzy of instant analysis. There will be tallies of Washington winners and losers, predictions about what it means for Democrats and Republicans, for my poll numbers, for my administration. But long after the debate fades away and the prognostication fades away and the dust settles, what will remain standing is not the government-run system some feared, or the status quo that serves the interests of the insurance industry, but a health care system that incorporates ideas from both parties - a system that works better for the American people.

If you have health insurance, this reform just gave you more control by reining in the worst excesses and abuses of the insurance industry with some of the toughest consumer protections this country has ever known - so that you are actually getting what you pay for.

If you don't have insurance, this reform gives you a chance to be a part of a big purchasing pool that will give you choice and competition and cheaper prices for insurance. And it includes the largest health care tax cut for working families and small businesses in history - so that if you lose your job and you change jobs, start that new business, you'll finally be able to purchase quality, affordable care and the security and peace of mind that comes with it.

This reform is the right thing to do for our seniors. It makes Medicare stronger and more solvent, extending its life by almost a decade. And it's the right thing to do for our future. It will reduce our deficit by more than $100 billion over the next decade, and more than $1 trillion in the decade after that.

So this isn't radical reform. But it is major reform. This legislation will not fix everything that ails our health care system. But it moves us decisively in the right direction. This is what change looks like.

Now as momentous as this day is, it's not the end of this journey. On Tuesday, the Senate will take up revisions to this legislation that the House has embraced, and these are revisions that have strengthened this law and removed provisions that had no place in it. Some have predicted another siege of parliamentary maneuvering in order to delay adoption of these improvements. I hope that's not the case. It's time to bring this debate to a close and begin the hard work of implementing this reform properly on behalf of the American people. This year, and in years to come, we have a solemn responsibility to do it right.

Nor does this day represent the end of the work that faces our country. The work of revitalizing our economy goes on. The work of promoting private sector job creation goes on. The work of putting American families' dreams back within reach goes on. And we march on, with renewed confidence, energized by this victory on their behalf.
In the end, what this day represents is another stone firmly laid in the foundation of the American Dream.

Tonight, we answered the call of history as so many generations of Americans have before us. When faced with crisis, we did not shrink from our challenge - we overcame it. We did not avoid our responsibility - we embraced it. We did not fear our future - we shaped it.

Thank you, God bless you, and may God bless the United States of America.

-- Associated Press

How They Voted

The 219-212 roll call Sunday by which the House passed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.
A "yes" vote is a vote to pass the bill.

Voting yes were 219 Democrats and 0 Republicans. Voting no were 34 Democrats and 178 Republicans.

There are 4 vacancies in the 435-member House.

ALABAMA
Democrats - Bright, N; Davis, N.
Republicans - Aderholt, N; Bachus, N; Bonner, N; Griffith, N; Rogers, N.

ALASKA
Republicans - Young, N.

ARIZONA
Democrats - Giffords, Y; Grijalva, Y; Kirkpatrick, Y; Mitchell, Y; Pastor, Y.
Republicans - Flake, N; Franks, N; Shadegg, N.

ARKANSAS
Democrats - Berry, N; Ross, N; Snyder, Y.
Republicans - Boozman, N.

CALIFORNIA
Democrats - Baca, Y; Becerra, Y; Berman, Y; Capps, Y; Cardoza, Y; Chu, Y; Costa, Y; Davis, Y; Eshoo, Y; Farr, Y; Filner, Y; Garamendi, Y; Harman, Y; Honda, Y; Lee, Y; Lofgren, Zoe, Y; Matsui, Y; McNerney, Y; Miller, George, Y; Napolitano, Y; Pelosi, Y; Richardson, Y; Roybal-Allard, Y; Sanchez, Linda T., Y; Sanchez, Loretta, Y; Schiff, Y; Sherman, Y; Speier, Y; Stark, Y; Thompson, Y; Waters, Y; Watson, Y; Waxman, Y; Woolsey, Y.
Republicans - Bilbray, N; Bono Mack, N; Calvert, N; Campbell, N; Dreier, N; Gallegly, N; Herger, N; Hunter, N; Issa, N; Lewis, N; Lungren, Daniel E., N; McCarthy, N; McClintock, N; McKeon, N; Miller, Gary, N; Nunes, N; Radanovich, N; Rohrabacher, N; Royce, N.

COLORADO
Democrats - DeGette, Y; Markey, Y; Perlmutter, Y; Polis, Y; Salazar, Y.
Republicans - Coffman, N; Lamborn, N.

CONNECTICUT
Democrats - Courtney, Y; DeLauro, Y; Himes, Y; Larson, Y; Murphy, Y.

DELAWARE
Republicans - Castle, N.

FLORIDA
Democrats - Boyd, Y; Brown, Corrine, Y; Castor, Y; Grayson, Y; Hastings, Y; Klein, Y; Kosmas, Y; Meek, Y; Wasserman Schultz, Y.
Republicans - Bilirakis, N; Brown-Waite, Ginny, N; Buchanan, N; Crenshaw, N; Diaz-Balart, L., N; Diaz-Balart, M., N; Mack, N; Mica, N; Miller, N; Posey, N; Putnam, N; Rooney, N; Ros-Lehtinen, N; Stearns, N; Young, N.

GEORGIA
Democrats - Barrow, N; Bishop, Y; Johnson, Y; Lewis, Y; Marshall, N; Scott, Y.
Republicans - Broun, N; Deal, N; Gingrey, N; Kingston, N; Linder, N; Price, N; Westmoreland, N.

HAWAII
Democrats - Hirono, Y.

IDAHO
Democrats - Minnick, N.
Republicans - Simpson, N.

ILLINOIS
Democrats - Bean, Y; Costello, Y; Davis, Y; Foster, Y; Gutierrez, Y; Halvorson, Y; Hare, Y; Jackson, Y; Lipinski, N; Quigley, Y; Rush, Y; Schakowsky, Y.
Republicans - Biggert, N; Johnson, N; Kirk, N; Manzullo, N; Roskam, N; Schock, N; Shimkus, N.

INDIANA
Democrats - Carson, Y; Donnelly, Y; Ellsworth, Y; Hill, Y; Visclosky, Y.
Republicans - Burton, N; Buyer, N; Pence, N; Souder, N.

IOWA
Democrats - Boswell, Y; Braley, Y; Loebsack, Y.
Republicans - King, N; Latham, N.

KANSAS
Democrats - Moore, Y.
Republicans - Jenkins, N; Moran, N; Tiahrt, N.

KENTUCKY
Democrats - Chandler, N; Yarmuth, Y.
Republicans - Davis, N; Guthrie, N; Rogers, N; Whitfield, N.

LOUISIANA
Democrats - Melancon, N.
Republicans - Alexander, N; Boustany, N; Cao, N; Cassidy, N; Fleming, N; Scalise, N.

MAINE
Democrats - Michaud, Y; Pingree, Y.

MARYLAND
Democrats - Cummings, Y; Edwards, Y; Hoyer, Y; Kratovil, N; Ruppersberger, Y; Sarbanes, Y; Van Hollen, Y.
Republicans - Bartlett, N.

MASSACHUSETTS
Democrats - Capuano, Y; Delahunt, Y; Frank, Y; Lynch, N; Markey, Y; McGovern, Y; Neal, Y; Olver, Y; Tierney, Y; Tsongas, Y.

MICHIGAN
Democrats - Conyers, Y; Dingell, Y; Kildee, Y; Kilpatrick, Y; Levin, Y; Peters, Y; Schauer, Y; Stupak, Y.
Republicans - Camp, N; Ehlers, N; Hoekstra, N; McCotter, N; Miller, N; Rogers, N; Upton, N.

MINNESOTA
Democrats - Ellison, Y; McCollum, Y; Oberstar, Y; Peterson, N; Walz, Y.
Republicans - Bachmann, N; Kline, N; Paulsen, N.

MISSISSIPPI
Democrats - Childers, N; Taylor, N; Thompson, Y.
Republicans - Harper, N.

MISSOURI
Democrats - Carnahan, Y; Clay, Y; Cleaver, Y; Skelton, N.
Republicans - Akin, N; Blunt, N; Emerson, N; Graves, N; Luetkemeyer, N.

MONTANA
Republicans - Rehberg, N.

NEBRASKA
Republicans - Fortenberry, N; Smith, N; Terry, N.

NEVADA
Democrats - Berkley, Y; Titus, Y.
Republicans - Heller, N.

NEW HAMPSHIRE
Democrats - Hodes, Y; Shea-Porter, Y.

NEW JERSEY
Democrats - Adler, N; Andrews, Y; Holt, Y; Pallone, Y; Pascrell, Y; Payne, Y; Rothman, Y; Sires, Y.
Republicans - Frelinghuysen, N; Garrett, N; Lance, N; LoBiondo, N; Smith, N.

NEW MEXICO
Democrats - Heinrich, Y; Lujan, Y; Teague, N.

NEW YORK
Democrats - Ackerman, Y; Arcuri, N; Bishop, Y; Clarke, Y; Crowley, Y; Engel, Y; Hall, Y; Higgins, Y; Hinchey, Y; Israel, Y; Lowey, Y; Maffei, Y; Maloney, Y; McCarthy, Y; McMahon, N; Meeks, Y; Murphy, Y; Nadler, Y; Owens, Y; Rangel, Y; Serrano, Y; Slaughter, Y; Tonko, Y; Towns, Y; Velazquez, Y; Weiner, Y.
Republicans - King, N; Lee, N.

NORTH CAROLINA
Democrats - Butterfield, Y; Etheridge, Y; Kissell, N; McIntyre, N; Miller, Y; Price, Y; Shuler, N; Watt, Y.
Republicans - Coble, N; Foxx, N; Jones, N; McHenry, N; Myrick, N.

NORTH DAKOTA
Democrats - Pomeroy, Y.

OHIO
Democrats - Boccieri, Y; Driehaus, Y; Fudge, Y; Kaptur, Y; Kilroy, Y; Kucinich, Y; Ryan, Y; Space, N; Sutton, Y; Wilson, Y.
Republicans - Austria, N; Boehner, N; Jordan, N; LaTourette, N; Latta, N; Schmidt, N; Tiberi, N; Turner, N.

OKLAHOMA
Democrats - Boren, N.
Republicans - Cole, N; Fallin, N; Lucas, N; Sullivan, N.

OREGON
Democrats - Blumenauer, Y; DeFazio, Y; Schrader, Y; Wu, Y.
Republicans - Walden, N.

PENNSYLVANIA
Democrats - Altmire, N; Brady, Y; Carney, Y; Dahlkemper, Y; Doyle, Y; Fattah, Y; Holden, N; Kanjorski, Y; Murphy, Patrick, Y; Schwartz, Y; Sestak, Y.
Republicans - Dent, N; Gerlach, N; Murphy, Tim, N; Pitts, N; Platts, N; Shuster, N; Thompson, N.

RHODE ISLAND
Democrats - Kennedy, Y; Langevin, Y.

SOUTH CAROLINA
Democrats - Clyburn, Y; Spratt, Y.
Republicans - Barrett, N; Brown, N; Inglis, N; Wilson, N.

SOUTH DAKOTA
Democrats - Herseth Sandlin, N.

TENNESSEE
Democrats - Cohen, Y; Cooper, Y; Davis, N; Gordon, Y; Tanner, N.
Republicans - Blackburn, N; Duncan, N; Roe, N; Wamp, N.

TEXAS
Democrats - Cuellar, Y; Doggett, Y; Edwards, N; Gonzalez, Y; Green, Al, Y; Green, Gene, Y; Hinojosa, Y; Jackson Lee, Y; Johnson, E. B., Y; Ortiz, Y; Reyes, Y; Rodriguez, Y.
Republicans - Barton, N; Brady, N; Burgess, N; Carter, N; Conaway, N; Culberson, N; Gohmert, N; Granger, N; Hall, N; Hensarling, N; Johnson, Sam, N; Marchant, N; McCaul, N; Neugebauer, N; Olson, N; Paul, N; Poe, N; Sessions, N; Smith, N; Thornberry, N.

UTAH
Democrats - Matheson, N.
Republicans - Bishop, N; Chaffetz, N.

VERMONT
Democrats - Welch, Y.

VIRGINIA
Democrats - Boucher, N; Connolly, Y; Moran, Y; Nye, N; Perriello, Y; Scott, Y.
Republicans - Cantor, N; Forbes, N; Goodlatte, N; Wittman, N; Wolf, N.

WASHINGTON
Democrats - Baird, Y; Dicks, Y; Inslee, Y; Larsen, Y; McDermott, Y; Smith, Y.
Republicans - Hastings, N; McMorris Rodgers, N; Reichert, N.

WEST VIRGINIA
Democrats - Mollohan, Y; Rahall, Y.
Republicans - Capito, N.

WISCONSIN
Democrats - Baldwin, Y; Kagen, Y; Kind, Y; Moore, Y; Obey, Y.
Republicans - Petri, N; Ryan, N; Sensenbrenner, N.

WYOMING
Republicans - Lummis, N.

Comments (122)

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curly123053
3258
Points
curly123053 03/21/10 - 11:07 pm
0
0

Communism is taking root in

Communism is taking root in America with passage of the Obamanation Obamacare bill. Thank you for all you who voted to take America to socialism. It is time for us to get involved if we do not want to lose anymore of our freedoms.

jack234
676
Points
jack234 03/21/10 - 11:10 pm
0
0

We are very proud of what

We are very proud of what congress has done to insure that all Americans will have health insurance. This is no longer a do nothing congress. This is a new day for our America. HELLO! HELLO! Our president has shown true leadership. HELLO! HELLO! I don't feel like I lost any freedom. I still got my gun. In fact, The president hasn't even mentioned guns. HELLO! HELLO!

jack234
676
Points
jack234 03/21/10 - 11:12 pm
0
0

I hope it will go down in the

I hope it will go down in the history books as Obama Care. (Rush words, not mine) Thank you Rush. HELLO! HELLO! HELLO!

Rolling Eyes
236
Points
Rolling Eyes 03/21/10 - 11:14 pm
0
0

This administration will not

This administration will not listen to what the majority of its citizens want. Well, come November they will hear us whether they like it or not!

dwb619
75481
Points
dwb619 03/21/10 - 11:21 pm
0
0

Good bye Rush, Delta is ready

Good bye Rush, Delta is ready when you are.

baronvonreich
0
Points
baronvonreich 03/21/10 - 11:29 pm
0
0

This harkens the old R.E.M.

This harkens the old R.E.M. song It's The End of the World As We Know It

Southern_Patriot
0
Points
Southern_Patriot 03/21/10 - 11:27 pm
0
0

hey jack234 ignorant is

hey jack234 ignorant is temporary stupid is forever and it's not covered under obamacare

Ole School
0
Points
Ole School 03/21/10 - 11:31 pm
0
0

NOW lets vote them OUT ! we

NOW lets vote them OUT ! we have sat down long enough ...VOTE THE FOOLS OUT !

Asitisinaug
3
Points
Asitisinaug 03/22/10 - 12:24 am
0
0

Watch what this does to the

Watch what this does to the unemployment rate. This administration is allowing our schools to close, teachers to loose their jobs, unemployment to far exceed 10%, has spent more tax money in 1 year than Bush or Clinton spent in 8 years, has taken funds from out national security while we are at war, doesn't have a clue on terrorism, is allowing public safety to dwindle by cutting funds to police and fire services and yet they will pass the most expensie and sweeping socalistic program which most Americans do not want. By their own admission, most who voted for the bill don't even have a clue all that it is in it or what it will cost. Our ONLY HOPE NOW is that all of these idiots, especially Pelosi, Reid, Frank and Obama are voted out of office and leaders who listen will replace them soon and revoke this idiotic legislation. We have enough social programs in this country being paid for by the hard working middle class Americans and it is time to stop enabling everyone to rely on the government for everything. This is a very bad day for our Country but hopefully will be a WAKE UP Day for true Americans to get rid of lying politicians who spend our money freely.

hopefulinaugusta
0
Points
hopefulinaugusta 03/21/10 - 11:36 pm
0
0

The administration is a

The administration is a representation of our nation as a whole and the fact that this health care bill has passed says that this is what the majority of our citizens want. And I hope it is the end of the world as we know it. That was the whole point in getting this bill passed.

cleanup
0
Points
cleanup 03/21/10 - 11:45 pm
0
0

Great day for the country.

Great day for the country. Congress has voted the will of the people, whether some of you like it or not. Sour grapes.

cleanup
0
Points
cleanup 03/21/10 - 11:48 pm
0
0

Now, we will see Rush

Now, we will see Rush Limbaugh prove once again that he is a liar. He can't move out of the country anyway. What country would take him?

Frankie-B
48
Points
Frankie-B 03/22/10 - 12:18 am
0
0

- Watch the market tomorrow

- Watch the market tomorrow as the realization that portfolios containing stock in insurance companies just crapped out

- Watch the enrollment in medical schools modulate in response to this

- Watch the conservative grass roots movement turn into a prairie fire

- America; where the indolent have a right to the fruits of their neighbor's hard labor. Atlas Shrugged, indeed.

Asitisinaug
3
Points
Asitisinaug 03/22/10 - 12:28 am
0
0

If you actually think that

If you actually think that just because we elect politicians they actually vote the "will of the people" you are very misinformed. Put this issue to a national vote and it would loose, according to the poles, by 70/30. Better yet, put this to a vote of all Americans who are not felons nor live off of the government dole (as all voting should be) and it would probalby be more like 90/10. As for the 10% that wants to give their money away to the government to mismanage it, please ADD to your taxes this year so the rest of us aren't forced to.

johnston.cliff
2
Points
johnston.cliff 03/22/10 - 12:29 am
0
0

If Obamacare doesn't end all

If Obamacare doesn't end all elections, and we don't know that it doesn't, then the fix on this bill will begin after the November elections. Congress still controls the purse strings and with money cut off, this assault will slow. Between now and November many more bills will pass with nothing but NeoSocialistDem support. The American voter went down the affirmative action diversity road too far and we're going to pay the price for years to come. Think Obamacare. The thirty million new citizens will vote for this obamanition.

johnston.cliff
2
Points
johnston.cliff 03/22/10 - 12:34 am
0
0

Remember when the tobacco

Remember when the tobacco industry was taxed billions / state for selling their evil product and the industry didn't bat an eye, they just increased their product by $3 a pack, initially? Well, the top 2% that is supposed to be taxed to pay for the $2 trillion obamacare will just increase their product cost or service cost so the consumer will pay the new tax. Silly voters, tricks are for the government educated. Thank you obamacare.

Aliyah
1
Points
Aliyah 03/22/10 - 12:35 am
0
0

WAKE UP IT IS TIME TO REPLACE

WAKE UP IT IS TIME TO REPLACE ALL.THEY ARE NOT LISTENING TO THE PEOPLE.

johnston.cliff
2
Points
johnston.cliff 03/22/10 - 12:51 am
0
0

Many dem votes were bought

Many dem votes were bought with promises of more legislation being forced through before November. Think obambcare

joe hill
9
Points
joe hill 03/22/10 - 12:58 am
0
0

Yes, legislation "forced

Yes, legislation "forced through" against the wishes of the regressive neanderthals who comprise the republican caucus. I'll be looking forward to it!

joe hill
9
Points
joe hill 03/22/10 - 12:59 am
0
0

Might as well do it now,

Might as well do it now, there's nothing stopping them! Ha ha ha ha ha!

justus4
93
Points
justus4 03/22/10 - 01:18 am
0
0

After Scott Brown's election,

Unpublished

After Scott Brown's election, Boss Hog (Rush L.) said, "Obamacare will not pass." so it appears that his ability to CORRECTLY predict political events is flawed. He, being the voice of conservatives are invested in this country's failure, but as usual, the American people prevailed. The President demonstrated what TRUE leadership is all about and history will judge him on that character asset. Now comes the doom predictions by the usual suspects, but if they were WRONG about previous predictions, why would any sane citizen believe them now? Well, it's simple: Republicans placed party politics over the welfare of the country, so expect them now to say & do almost anything. Again, HCR is a win/win for all Americans and as stated before, the republicans are going the way of the Whigs.

Asitisinaug
3
Points
Asitisinaug 03/22/10 - 01:18 am
0
0

So, now you are a nut job and

So, now you are a nut job and a miserable excuse for a human being if you belive that the money you earn should not be going to the government to distribute to others on your behalf. If you belive in enabling others, so be it...give more that what you owe in taxes. Of course since many in this administration have been found to have cheated on their taxes in order to pay less it really is ironic how much "they care" about giving to all the citizens with our money.

Asitisinaug
3
Points
Asitisinaug 03/22/10 - 01:18 am
0
0

.

.

johnston.cliff
2
Points
johnston.cliff 03/22/10 - 01:25 am
0
0

That's right joe hill,

That's right joe hill, nothing stoppin'them until November (if we still have elections then). We agree. There will be many more bills passed without support from Americans. I know you silly people think the gloating is funny, and I guess to a certain level of mentality it could be, but if you ever experience reality your perspective will change.

Aliyah
1
Points
Aliyah 03/22/10 - 01:34 am
0
0

okay you welfare muchers who

okay you welfare muchers who wantted this to pass what are you gonna do when you find out the truth.Who is gonna pay for it?

Augusta resident
1368
Points
Augusta resident 03/22/10 - 02:25 am
0
0

Too soon to tell.

Too soon to tell.

concernednative
28
Points
concernednative 03/22/10 - 04:04 am
0
0

The article says "Crowds of

The article says "Crowds of protesters outside the Capitol shouted "just vote no" in a futile attempt to stop the inevitable taking place inside"- That sums up you right wing nut jobs. Your attempts to stop progress are futile. Next we will have a jobs bill and get everything in place to do well in November.

johnston.cliff
2
Points
johnston.cliff 03/22/10 - 05:14 am
0
0

Again, I'll write very slowly

Again, I'll write very slowly and ask the most simple questions, who's going to pay the bill for you parasites? Was my 12:34am post really that confusing?

Lobosolo
5
Points
Lobosolo 03/22/10 - 06:05 am
0
0

Not confusing at all, pettyt.

Not confusing at all, pettyt. You've always made it clear where you stand with futile attempts at intelligent sarcasm... Parasites? BWAAAAAHAAAHAAA... Delta is ready when you are!!! You'll probably need a new inflatable cushion if you ain't too puckered up from this one... the country is finally growing up (just a little, but nonetheless)... You'll be sitting and stewing all the way to November when you'll really go over the edge by finding out (AGAIN!) how most Americans don't follow your puckered view... Why don't you head on over to your favorite bookstore in Laurens today and re-feed your hate...

Techfan
6461
Points
Techfan 03/22/10 - 06:15 am
0
0

Muchers?

Muchers?

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