Enrollment surges with flexible GI Bill

LAW KEEPS GI BILL FUNDS IN FAMILY

  • Follow Metro

National Guard Staff Sgt. Charlene Newberry would like to eventually pass the college funding benefit she receives to her 1-year-old daughter, Chloe.

Back | Next
Cadet Capt. Monique Horsley studies at Augusta State University, where 286 students enrolled with GI Bill assistance in the fall 2009 semester.  
  Rainier Ehrhardt/Staff
Rainier Ehrhardt/Staff
Cadet Capt. Monique Horsley studies at Augusta State University, where 286 students enrolled with GI Bill assistance in the fall 2009 semester.

With a new GI Bill that went into effect in August, that's now a possibility.

"I'm pretty excited about it because she can get a good college education without it coming out of my pocket," said Newberry, a junior at Augusta State University.

Her husband, who is active-duty Army, will graduate from Troy University next year and also plans to transfer his remaining benefits to Chloe through the new bill.

Unlike the previous Montgomery GI Bill, the post-9/11 GI bill, which was approved by Congress in 2008, allows veterans to transfer remaining college-education benefits to a spouse or child.

The more generous allowance, some say, should swell the ranks of those attending college on GI bill assistance as the bill gains in popularity.

"There is a whole lot of interest in the post-9/11 bill," said Jan Northstar, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Locally, it's a trend that has already been seen at Augusta State University, which had 286 students enroll with GI Bill assistance in fall semester 2009, ASU spokeswoman Tunisia Williams said. That's 61 more than in fall 2008 and 70 more than in fall 2007.

At Augusta Technical College such numbers have slightly increased since fall 2007, with 265 of its more than 5,000 students receiving GI Bill help this winter quarter compared with 239 in fall 2007, according to school records.

The University of South Carolina Aiken's numbers have stayed steady, with 64 students receiving military funding this year and 65 last year, spokeswoman Jennifer Conner said.

Newberry, who served on Army active duty for six years, said most of the military students she has classes with at Augusta State are on the post-9/11 bill.

She said she applied when it became available in August. After a 41/2-month wait caused by a backlog of applicants, she said she decided to go back to the older Montgomery GI Bill.

Newberry said she receives about $1,500 a month.

The new bill offers tuition pay based on a veteran's time of service, a monthly housing allowance and as much as $1,000 a year for books and supplies.

Once she graduates with a psychology degree next year, Newberry said, she plans to again apply for the new bill so she can pass on her remaining benefits to her daughter.

Nationally, about 300,000 veterans are enrolled in higher education, according to the American Council on Education.

As of mid-January, Northstar said, the VA had processed about $1.3 billion in post-9/11 GI Bill payments to more than 167,000 student veterans enrolled for the fall semester. The VA also has received 103,000 spring enrollments under the new bill and has processed more than 72,000.

Learn about the new GI Bill

For more information on the post-9/11 GI Bill, visit either www.gibill.va.gov or the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs' Facebook page on the topic at facebook.com/gibillEducation, making sure to capitalize "Education."

Comments (3) Add comment
ADVISORY: Users are solely responsible for opinions they post here and for following agreed-upon rules of civility. Posts and comments do not reflect the views of this site. Posts and comments are automatically checked for inappropriate language, but readers might find some comments offensive or inaccurate. If you believe a comment violates our rules, click the "Flag as offensive" link below the comment.
deekster
24
Points
deekster 01/31/10 - 11:33 am
0
0
I just asked my wife, "what

I just asked my wife, "what is with all of the advertisement for these satellite colleges". Thank you AC for enlightening us. I should have known if was "federal grant money/entitlement". The GI Bill, I have no problem with same. Military service deserves the GI Bill. But, GENERATIONAL, passed on, compensation. LOL The statement says it all, "I'm pretty excited about it because she can get a good college education without it coming out of my pocket," said Newberry, a junior at Augusta State University. Yes, Newberry, it is coming out of my pocket and my childrens' pockets. They and I paid for their education.

Riverman1
79223
Points
Riverman1 01/31/10 - 11:56 am
0
0
I have no problems with any

I have no problems with any version of the GI Bill, but, in general, we have too many people attending college who shouldn't. The availability of federal money in the 60's due to the GI Bill led to a proliferation of new small colleges. The fact is we have too many people going to college these days when they should be attending hard technical schools learning trades. IQ levels do not improve with college. Few have the inherent ability to use a true college education. That's the hard truth we like to ignore as we make more and more money available for everyone to attend college.

corgimom
27746
Points
corgimom 01/31/10 - 05:30 pm
0
0
Stop offering remedial

Stop offering remedial courses in 4-year colleges. If you need remedial courses in college, you don't belong there, until you raise your level of education and skills. Make entrance exams mean something, like they used to.

Back to Top

Top headlines

Mother of newborn left in car to face possible indictment

Richmond County Civil and Magistrate Court Presiding Judge H. Scott Allen ruled at the conclusion of a preliminary hearing for 20-year-old Alicia Manigault that her case would be bound over to a ...
Search Augusta jobs