Georgia Regents joins in Great American Smokeout

Georgia Regents University observed the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smoke­out campaign Thursday with “commit to quit” stations to encourage students, staff and community members to kick the tobacco habit.

Students and research assistants manned tables on both campuses. They offered information on the school’s tobacco cessation programs, along with information on lung screenings and the negative health effects of using electronic cigarettes.

Joshua Nguyen and Michael Colpoys, research assistants for the Georgia Prevention Institute, manned the information table in the student center on the health sciences campus. Both considered raising awareness of smoking and its possible health risks an important part of their work for the university.

“We do have a cancer center here, and smoking is one of the leading causes of lung cancer,” Colpoys said. “Almost 11,000 people die a year due to the effects of smoking or second-hand smoke in Georgia. This is vital information for people to know.”

Smokers can get information about the cancer center’s cessation services at gru.edu/cancer/tobaccofree. The cancer center also offers a free lung cancer screening to qualifying long-term smokers. For more information, visit gru.edu/cancer/lung-screening.

GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT CAMPAIGN

Every year, on the third Thursday in November, the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout Campaign urges smokers to make a plan to quit smoking. Since the 1970s, the event has drawn attention to the numerous deaths and diseases smoking causes.

  • About 42 million people in the United States smoke cigarettes.
  • As of 2012, 13.4 million Americans smoked cigars and 2.3 million smoked tobacco in pipes.
  • Find resources to help smokers quit on the American Cancer Society’s Web site.

Source: American Cancer Society

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