BAE Systems' Aiken plant to cut positions

AIKEN --- BAE Systems' Aiken plant will reduce its work force by 20 percent in November.

 

The Arlington, Va.-based company notified employees on Monday that it would eliminate 45 hourly positions on Nov. 4, according to Shannon Smith, a senior communications specialist.

The company, which manufactures components for military ground combat vehicles and Navy gun systems, said the reduction was a result of completion of two projects, the Iraqi Light Armored Vehicle and the Vertical Launching System and SOCOM requirement, and reduction in parts for the Bradley Fighting Vehicle.

Smith said the company has several government contracts, but the Obama administration's shift in military presence in the Middle East didn't necessarily impact the Aiken plant or its production.

The company added 30 employees to the Aiken location in 2007 for the contract with the Department of Defense, bringing its workforce to about 270 employees. Monday's announcement is the third layoff this year.

Smith said the company currently has 187 employees in Aiken.

However, the company overall hasn't suffered the Aiken plant's fate. Since 2007, the company has added 19,000 employees and currently employs 107,000 people on five continents.

The company, located in the former Avondale Distribution Center in Sage Mill Industrial Park, also produces engine compartments for Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Systems and BAE's wheeled vehicle designed to deal with improvised explosive devices and small arms fire.

BAE Systems is a subsidiary of London-based global defense and aerospace company BAE Systems PLC.

The 45 employees will receive severance packages, but Smith declined to comment on the details. Employees will also receive career transition services, she said.

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