Citizens want more rights, fewer taxes

A majority is a majority is a majority. Why Tracy E. Williams Jr. thinks this is a problem confounds me and, I'm sure, others like me.

 

Mr. Williams' letter ("Are Republicans out to destroy us?" Oct. 13) is just another example of name-calling by another liberal. In fact, all of this is becoming juvenile.

From the atmosphere of the herd, to the household, to school, to government, when the demand for one thing outweighs the demand for another -- well, that's the breaks. When it comes to the current state of affairs of the United States, citizens want to keep more of their money along with keeping their rights. I and others understand the importance of paying taxes to keep us safe, etc. But when the tax rates start inching closer to half our income, that is a problem. Mr. Williams surely isn't stating that for every $100 he makes he would gladly give $50 of it away.

I am far from having the income of the wealthiest few Americans, but guess what: Those wealthiest Americans are employing my husband, which keeps food on my table. If the government takes more money away from the rich guy, my family suffers either in the form of lower wages or, worse, a job loss. Why is this so hard to understand?

And as far as health care goes, the real reason why people don't like this is because we were never asked our opinion on something we will have to do! Allowing the government to dictate goods and services I use or buy is embarking on a dangerous road.

The hallowed ground of this country was founded on the premise that Americans are able to make their own choices. If that means that someone chooses to be an actor, I say, "Break a leg." For those who choose to become a doctor, I say, "Bless you." For those who choose to let me take care of them, I say, "Shame on you."

Hopefully this helps Mr. Williams understand the majority of this country right now.

Katherine Wideman

Martinez

Are Republicans out to destroy us?

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