Comedian Robin Williams dead in apparent suicide

Monday, Aug 11, 2014 7:23 PM
Last updated 9:49 PM
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SAN RAFAEL, Calif. — Robin Williams, the Academy Award winner and comic supernova whose explosions of pop culture riffs and impressions dazzled audiences for decades and made him a gleamy-eyed laureate for the Information Age, died Monday in an apparent suicide. He was 63.

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FILE - This March 27, 2010 file photo shows actor Robin Williams speaking at The 24th American Cinematheque Awards honoring Matt Damon in Beverly Hills, Calif. Williams, whose free-form comedy and adept impressions dazzled audiences for decades, has died in an apparent suicide. He was 63. The Marin County Sheriff's Office said Williams was pronounced dead at his home in California on Monday, Aug. 11, 2014. The sheriff's office said a preliminary investigation showed the cause of death to be a suicide due to asphyxia.(AP Photo/Dan Steinberg, File)  DAN STEINBERG
DAN STEINBERG
FILE - This March 27, 2010 file photo shows actor Robin Williams speaking at The 24th American Cinematheque Awards honoring Matt Damon in Beverly Hills, Calif. Williams, whose free-form comedy and adept impressions dazzled audiences for decades, has died in an apparent suicide. He was 63. The Marin County Sheriff's Office said Williams was pronounced dead at his home in California on Monday, Aug. 11, 2014. The sheriff's office said a preliminary investigation showed the cause of death to be a suicide due to asphyxia.(AP Photo/Dan Steinberg, File)

Williams was pronounced dead at his home in California on Monday, according to the sheriff’s office in Marin County, north of San Francisco. The sheriff’s office said a preliminary investigation shows the cause of death to be a suicide due to asphyxia.

“This morning, I lost my husband and my best friend, while the world lost one of its most beloved artists and beautiful human beings. I am utterly heartbroken,” said Williams’ wife, Susan Schneider. “On behalf of Robin’s family, we are asking for privacy during our time of profound grief. As he is remembered, it is our hope the focus will not be on Robin’s death, but on the countless moments of joy and laughter he gave to millions,”

Williams had been battling severe depression recently, said Mara Buxbaum, his press representative.

From his breakthrough in the late 1970s as the alien in the hit TV show “Mork and Mindy,” through his standup act and such films as “Good Morning, Vietnam,” the short, barrel-chested Williams ranted and shouted as if just sprung from solitary confinement. Loud, fast, manic, he parodied everyone from John Wayne to Keith Richards, impersonating a Russian immigrant as easily as a pack of Nazi attack dogs.

He was a riot in drag in “Mrs. Doubtfire,” or as a cartoon genie in “Aladdin.” He won his Academy Award in a rare, but equally intense dramatic role, as a teacher in the 1997 film “Good Will Hunting.”

He was no less on fire in interviews. During a 1989 chat with The Associated Press, he could barely stay seated in his hotel room, or even mention the film he was supposed to promote, as he free-associated about comedy and the cosmos.

“There’s an Ice Age coming,” he said. “But the good news is there’ll be daiquiris for everyone and the Ice Capades will be everywhere. The lobster will keep for at least 100 years, that’s the good news. The Swanson dinners will last a whole millennium. The bad news is the house will basically be in Arkansas.”

Following Williams on stage, Billy Crystal once observed, was like trying to top the Civil War. In a 1993 interview with the AP, Williams recalled an appearance early in his career on “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.” Bob Hope was also there.

“It was interesting,” Williams said. “He was supposed to go on before me and I was supposed to follow him, and I had to go on before him because he was late. I don’t think that made him happy. I don’t think he was angry, but I don’t think he was pleased.

“I had been on the road and I came out, you know, gassed, and I killed and had a great time. Hope comes out and Johnny leans over and says, ‘Robin Williams, isn’t he funny?’ Hope says, ‘Yeah, he’s wild. But you know, Johnny, it’s great to be back here with you.’”

In 1992, Carson chose Williams and Bette Midler as his final guests.

Like so many funnymen, he had serious ambitions, winning his Oscar for his portrayal of an empathetic therapist in “Good Will Hunting.” He also played for tears in “Awakenings,” “Dead Poets Society” and “What Dreams May Come,” something that led New York Times critic Stephen Holden to once say he dreaded seeing the actor’s “Humpty Dumpty grin and crinkly moist eyes.”

Williams also won three Golden Globes, for “Good Morning, Vietnam,” “Mrs. Doubtfire” and “The Fisher King.”

His other film credits included Robert Altman’s “Popeye” (a box office bomb), Paul Mazursky’s “Moscow on the Hudson,” Steven Spielberg’s “Hook” and Woody Allen’s “Deconstructing Harry.” On stage, Williams joined fellow comedian Steve Martin in a 1988 Broadway revival of “Waiting for Godot.”

“I dread the word ‘art,’” Williams told the AP in 1989. “That’s what we used to do every night before we’d go on with ‘Waiting for Godot.’ We’d go, ‘No art. Art dies tonight.’ We’d try to give it a life, instead of making “Godot” so serious. It’s cosmic vaudeville staged by the Marquis de Sade.”

His personal life was often short on laughter. He had acknowledged drug and alcohol problems in the 1970s and ‘80s and was among the last to see John Belushi before the “Saturday Night Live” star died of a drug overdose in 1982.

Williams announced in recent years that he was again drinking but rebounded well enough to joke about it during his recent tour. “I went to rehab in wine country,” he said, “to keep my options open.”

Born in Chicago in 1951, Williams would remember himself as a shy kid who got some early laughs from his mother – by mimicking his grandmother. He opened up more in high school when he joined the drama club and he was accepted into the Juilliard Academy, where he had several classes in which he and Christopher Reeve were the only students and John Houseman was the teacher.

Encouraged by Houseman to pursue comedy, Williams identified with the wildest and angriest of performers: Jonathan Winters, Lenny Bruce, Richard Pryor, George Carlin. Their acts were not warm and lovable. They were just being themselves.

“You look at the world and see how scary it can be sometimes and still try to deal with the fear,” he told the AP in 1989. “Comedy can deal with the fear and still not paralyze you or tell you that it’s going away. You say, OK, you got certain choices here, you can laugh at them and then once you’ve laughed at them and you have expunged the demon, now you can deal with them. That’s what I do when I do my act.”

He unveiled Mork, the alien from the planet Ork, in an appearance on “Happy Days,” and was granted his own series, which ran from 1978-82.

In subsequent years, Williams often returned to television – for appearances on “Saturday Night Live,” for “Friends,” for comedy specials, for “American Idol,” where in 2008 he pretended to be a “Russian idol” who belts out a tuneless, indecipherable “My Way.”

Williams also could handle a script, when he felt like it, and also think on his feet. He ad-libbed in many of his films and was just as quick in person. During a media tour for “Awakenings,” when director Penny Marshall mistakenly described the film as being set in a “menstrual hospital,” instead of “mental hospital,” Williams quickly stepped in and joked, “It’s a period piece.”

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The Savage Madame
627
Points
The Savage Madame 08/11/14 - 07:32 pm
7
0
Great Loss

The world lost something very valuable here.

Just My Opinion
6264
Points
Just My Opinion 08/11/14 - 08:08 pm
5
0
I am surprised at how sad I

I am surprised at how sad I am about his death. I guess it's because he truly brought joy and laughter to so many of us. It seems he was so bent on making us laugh, that we had no idea he was hurting so much inside. Even though my heart hurts now, I also am thankful for being able to enjoy his immense talent. I will miss Robin Williams.

OJP
7738
Points
OJP 08/12/14 - 12:55 am
4
0
@Just My Opinion

Same here. The death of a celebrity has never hit me this hard.

"Seize the day, boys. Seize the day."

ken8375309
1787
Points
ken8375309 08/11/14 - 08:54 pm
6
0
I remember watching the first

I remember watching the first episode of Mork and Mindy..Even though I never met him, I feel like I lost a good friend. There was just something about him.. Robin, thank you for all the laughs and inspiration that you have provided us for the last 35 plus years.. You will be dearly missed..

flipa1
3023
Points
flipa1 08/11/14 - 09:05 pm
5
0
Tragic. Really going to miss

Tragic. Really going to miss Robin Williams...
Prayers for friends and family...

AutumnLeaves
10259
Points
AutumnLeaves 08/11/14 - 09:20 pm
5
0
Nothing to do but cry it out

Nothing to do but cry it out sometimes. This is one of those times. So much going on this week personally and in the world, this just hit my tipping point for tears, no matter what the reason for his death. I know the authorities have to do an investigation, but I hope everyone that loves Robin Williams will be able to grieve in relative peace. Thank you for all the tears of laughter over the years, Robin. I hope you have found peace.

freeradical
1176
Points
freeradical 08/12/14 - 04:58 am
2
0
Multi-Talented Genius

And a great loss who will be sorely missed .

It is a shame that as people such as him and Philip Hoffman make

their final message to the world one that all money , fame ,

power , influence is absolutely worthless in solving the problems

of life's mysteries , that myth will go on in full force today ,

perpetuated with vigorous insistence by everyone from the president

to Entertainment Tonight .

AFjoe
5506
Points
AFjoe 08/12/14 - 07:25 am
1
1
Farewell Mork

NaNu NaNu...

justthefacts
25062
Points
justthefacts 08/12/14 - 08:31 am
1
0
Funniest bit ever- Golf

I can't link it because of colorful language. But, google Robin Williams how golf was invented. Prepare to laugh your behind off.

LillyfromtheMills
14314
Points
LillyfromtheMills 08/12/14 - 08:46 am
1
0
JTF

Tx - too funny- he will be missed!

justthefacts
25062
Points
justthefacts 08/12/14 - 10:50 am
2
0
lilly

"f-no, we make em do it 18 times!!!!!!!!!!!!

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