Family reunion brings together centenarians, siblings

Sunday, Aug 10, 2014 1:18 AM
Last updated 4:30 AM
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For Eddie Williams, family reunions are a time for relatives near and far to come together, kick back and share memories of the “good old days.” Few other families can claim to have four members with nearly 400 years of memories at such gatherings.

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Georgianna Brunson-Blocker, who is 105, sits with nephew Eddie Williams at his Hephzibah home. She traveled from New Jersey to attend the family reunion.  SARA CALDWELL/STAFF
SARA CALDWELL/STAFF
Georgianna Brunson-Blocker, who is 105, sits with nephew Eddie Williams at his Hephzibah home. She traveled from New Jersey to attend the family reunion.

On Saturday, family from as far north as New York and as far south as Florida gathered at Williams’ humble Heph­zibah home for this year’s celebration.

While the bulk of the party was outside, where people splashed in an inflatable slide and munched on grilled hamburgers, many piled into the living room to listen to the oldest-living matriarchs and patriarchs, all of whom are siblings.

In one chair sat 105-year-old Georgianna Brunson-Blocker, who came from Newark, N.J. Though her vision isn’t quite what it used to be, she relished in the opportunity to hear the familiar voices of her family.

“I can just imagine seeing the faces of the people here, and that’s warming,” said Brunson-Blocker, who was born in 1909 in Edgefield. “It makes you feel good thinking back to the good times.”

In a chair near the kitchen sat her sister, 107-year-old Lure Brunson-Ryan. She is one of 11 siblings and is the oldest of the surviving four, which include her brothers O’Neal Brunson Sr., 92, and James Willie Brunson, 95.

Brunson-Ryan sat with one hand on Calvin Dicker­son, whom she had raised since he was 7 months old. Each time a new family member entered the room, her face lit up as she called out their name.

“I think it’s a pleasure to see everyone,” she said as she rocked backward into her chair.

Delores Jarrett, who called her aunts and uncles “walking encyclopedias,” said she’s fortunate to have living family members who experienced major events throughout the country’s history. The siblings survived the darkest days of the Great Depression and witnessed the ugliness of segregation.

In World War II, O’Neal Brunson Sr. served in the Air Force and James Brun­son in the Army. Both earned honorable discharges.

“They have all the information that we need,” Jarrett said. “These are our history books, and we’ve tried to embrace that. I can ask them questions that I can’t ask a book.”

Williams said he’s been inspired by his aunts and uncles. They took him in when he needed advice and acted as parents after his mother, Sofia Brunson, died in 1974.

“If I ever needed something or wanted something, I would always go to them,” he said. “They would always advise me, and they were always wise counselors.”

Jarrett said the siblings’ willingness to travel has been nothing short of remarkable, but she said she feels more blessed that all four have survived to share their experiences. She said she hopes to live a life as long as theirs.

When asked about her secret to longevity, Brunson-Ryan laughed and looked up at the ceiling.

“There ain’t no secret to it,” she said. “God can do wonders.”

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corgimom
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corgimom 08/10/14 - 07:30 am
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What a wonderful story, oh,

What a wonderful story, oh, the stories that they could tell.

I wish someone could interview them and get an oral history before it's too late.

historylover
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historylover 08/10/14 - 09:23 am
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I agree Corgimom

I can't even imagine the living history available in that one room. I would have loved to have been there!

AutumnLeaves
10391
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AutumnLeaves 08/10/14 - 10:36 am
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I had hoped to do a project

I had hoped to do a project of oral histories from seniors in Augusta, on the recommendation of someone that said I would be ideal for the purpose, but she was not able to get the necessary funding and I didn't have the means or authority to do it myself. I agree, it would have been fascinating to be in this room with these 107 and 105 year old matriarchs who are personal witnesses to their own legacies.

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