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Millions gain health coverage, but Georgia lags behind, reports show

Thursday, July 10, 2014 12:17 AM
Last updated Friday, July 11, 2014 9:16 AM
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The Affordable Care Act allowed the uninsured rate nationally to drop this year from 20 percent to 15 percent among adults 19 to 64 years old, a new report found. But in places such as Georgia, which did not expand Medicaid, the uninsured rate remains high, particularly for the poor.

The report today from The Commonwealth Fund follows research it reported last week in the New England Journal of Medicine that an estimated 20 million people gained coverage. In the new report, looking at those it considers “working age adults” or those 19-64, 9.5 million gained coverage through the marketplace, either in a private health insurance plan or through Medicaid. Of those, 59 percent who chose a private plan had previously been uninsured and 66 percent of those who chose Medicaid had lacked coverage, according to the new report.

The report broke out numbers for the six largest states, including Florida, but not for Georgia. A separate report from WalletHub, however, found Georgia’s uninsured rate is still above 18 percent, the 10th highest rate in the country, despite a 3.5 percent drop attributed to enrollment in the marketplace. That report said more than 316,000 in Georgia enrolled in private insurance through the marketplaces and more than 188,000 in Georgia got Medicaid.

Still, The Commonwealth Fund report shows there is “a substantial decline in the nation’s uninsured rate among working age adults,” President David Blumenthal said. “The greatest gains were among groups who have historically experienced high uninsured rates, including young adults ages 19-34, Latinos and people with low incomes.”

But there were substantial differences among states, particularly among those that expanded Medicaid and those that did not.

In the 25 states and District of Columbia that expanded, the rate among people below the federal poverty level dropped from 28 percent to 17 percent.

In the 25 states that did not expand, the rate went from 38 to 36 percent, which was not statistically significant, said Sara Collins, the vice president of health care coverage and access for the group.

In California, which expanded Medicaid, the uninsured rate was cut in half, from 22 to 11 percent, while in Florida, which did not expand, the rate dipped only slightly from 30 percent to 26 percent.

Those that gained coverage seemed to like it. Even among Republicans, 74 percent said they were somewhat or very optimistic about their coverage.

“Large majorities of adults with new coverage regardless of prior insurance status, age, political affiliation or new coverage source are optimistic that their new insurance will improve their ability to get the health care that they need,” Collins said.

About 60 percent of them said they already had used their coverage; among those, 62 percent said they would not have been able to access or afford it without the new plan, Collins said.

“Three-quarters of people who were uninsured when they enrolled and had used their new coverage said they would not have been able to get this care prior to getting their new health insurance,” Collins said. “But 44 percent of adults who had insurance when they enrolled also said they would not have been able to get this care before they enrolled in their new plan.”

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seenitB4
97123
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seenitB4 07/10/14 - 06:14 am
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SO DUUUHHH!

Keep the illegals pouring over & you will get less health care BUT some are so blind they can't see that...take off the blinders & VOTE for the USA & what we need in roads---vet care--poor in this country...

Like the old saying "You ain't seen nothing yet!"

Bodhisattva
7148
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Bodhisattva 07/10/14 - 07:14 am
2
3
Illegals don't qualify for ACA benefits

But, then again, neither do South Carolinians or Georgians. Since the Governor of South Carolina refuses the Medicaid expansion, and the Governor of Georgia cowardly (just in case he loses the election this fall) passed he responsiblity from himself to the legislature, who immediately made it illegal for the Governor to make the decision (just in case Nathan loses), typical GOP cowardly dirty politics, tens of thousands can't qualify for Medicaid and tens of thousands of working class and middle class families can't qualify for tax credits (who earn up to 400% of the poverty level) which would make the premiums more affordable. Party above people. The GOP mantra. Why don't the states vote and prohibit their citizens from recieving the deduction for having a child? From deduction mortgage interest payments? Because this is all politics and an anti-Obama game. Part of the oath the GOP swore even before he was inaugurated o oppose anything and everything he tried to do. It doesn't matter if it hurts the country ot the people, if Obama has anything to do with it, try to stop it in its tracks. Who cares if people can't afford to see a doctor, might lose a limb from diabetes or go blind? Might even die? Heck this is politics, and politics is more important than the citizens of your states. Nikki and Nathan, while both professing to be "christians" don't care how much blood you have on your hands. For 3 years it doesn't cost the states a dime, and then the states on have to pick up 10% for covering thens of thousands with health insurance and saving lives, but face it, neither of you care one iota about the people of your states. Either of you would dole out ten times as much for tax breaks to some corporation who doesn't need it, but when it comes to people, you won;t spend a dime. "christians"? Not even close. Politicians? Both of you nailed that one. "Inasmuch as ye did it not to one of the least of these, ye did it not to me." Remember that when you try to sleep at night, and remember the blood on your hands from those who have died from your vindictive and partisan politics. You'll hear it again one day.

seenitB4
97123
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seenitB4 07/10/14 - 07:56 am
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bod ...do you read the paper?

Illegals get more in help from our government than the thousands of poor in Chicago...do you see that!!!

If this place is so great why do we have so many KILLING each other??? Do you ever think JOBS might help the poor right here in the USA...sometimes I wonder what it will take to change the tide in this country...another upheaval in congress, or more killings in cities that are already out of control.

jimmymac
47431
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jimmymac 07/10/14 - 07:57 am
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ACA
Unpublished

GA rightfully didn't expand Medicaid because taxpayers are paying enough for the moochers now just feeding and clothing them. The people needing healthcare are the middle class who have to pay for their own. States that have expanded Medicaid will suffer from the effects when the government subsidy dries up in a few years. Then their taxpayers will be on the hook for the whole cost and the burden will bankrupt many of them.

corgimom
38294
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corgimom 07/10/14 - 08:24 am
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The jobs aren't there and

The jobs aren't there and aren't going to be there.

Between the advent of computers and the loss of the manufacturing jobs, the loss of jobs is staggering.

It used to be that there were plenty of manual labor jobs around. Not any more.

deestafford
31733
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deestafford 07/10/14 - 09:14 am
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Notice there is no mention...

Notice there is no mention as to the amount of money that this is costing the taxpayers for the "subsidies" that these increases are causing.

There is a significant number of these "new" people who are being subsidized by the taxpayer and the states that went along with this are going to be in a financial bind in the near future.

There ain't no such thing as a free lunch. Costs will go up and quality will go down. That is the result when more people are put in the wagon thereby reducing the number of folks pulling the wagon.

Bodhisattva
7148
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Bodhisattva 07/10/14 - 08:05 pm
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Well deestafford

Other than that whopping extra 10% after the 3 years, the states that said "No", just because it was Obama, still get to pay all of the rest of the taxes involved with the program. They're just prevent tens of thousands of their citizens from gaining the benefits of having affordable insurance premiums, will have their hospitals get to eat the costs for uninsured patients (That one's a joke. Hospitals don't eat the costs, they just pass them down to everyone else, or as we've seen and will continue to see with rural hospitals who've begged the Governors to accept the expansions, simply close their doors.), and will God knows how many familes not seek medical care because they can't afford it. Did you worry how much Medicare Part D (which had ZERO options to offset any of its added costs) was going to cost? What about people who have 10 kids and kids a tax writeoff for each one? Heck, what about South Carolina receiving $7.87 back from the fed for every dollar they pay in taxes (GA receives $1.05)? No complaints there? There are enough gimme's and tax breaks for Romney to pay less than 14% for $40 million of income for 2 years (he fudged one year and would have paid around 9%, and guaranteed he filed an amended form the nexy year and got all of that money back), but we have to worry about the costs for providing a tax break for middle class and working class people to have health insurance? Bull droppings. It's all anti-Obama hatred, and everyone who posts against it, and the 2 lying governors who won't help their citizens know it. If this was a Bush program, just like Medicare Part D, they'd have passed it in a heartbeat. They're just partisan hacks who put politics over people every time. Like I said earlier, they both have some nerve calling thenselves "christians", especially Haley, who wears her religious conversion like a badge of honor and uses it like a bludgeon in the bills she promotes and signs against those who believe differently, but won't allow federal law to be followed that expands Medicaid and gives working and middle class familes a tax break for health insurance? She's set up the state (about the same as GA) with so many business and corporaate tax credits, the state can easily lose money on the deal ( a great example is her tax incentives to businesses that have up to 10 years to create up to FORTY JOBS). Woohoo! That vs. paying 10% of policies for people you know are going to use medical care and millions of dollars are going to be paid to your doctors and hospitals that otherwise wouldn't be paid. Like I said, it's nothing but politics over people. Gibe God know how much in incentives to a company that MAY produce a tiny amount of jobs a decade in the future vs. help improve the health of your citizens now. Unemployment has decreased in SC 4% since she came into office, yet the number of people living in poverty has increased by 100,000. It looks like she's focuses the tax incentives in the wrong direction and need to provide them people, not businesses that might create less than 4 dozen jobs in a deacde.

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