Problems fighting Atlanta chemical fire

Monday, June 2, 2014 10:53 AM
Last updated 7:26 PM
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ATLANTA — A new report finds a fire last month that consumed a metro Atlanta chemical plant burned for at least two hours before checks began for dangerous emissions.

A massive fire at a chemical plant outside Atlanta prompted the evacuation of hundreds of people from nearby businesses and spewed black plumes of smoke that were visible from miles away. The fire started shortly after 8 p.m. in a warehouse containing chemicals in Marietta. The warehouse houses Amrep, which manufactures a variety of chemical products, including automotive supplies, according to the company's Web site.   ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
A massive fire at a chemical plant outside Atlanta prompted the evacuation of hundreds of people from nearby businesses and spewed black plumes of smoke that were visible from miles away. The fire started shortly after 8 p.m. in a warehouse containing chemicals in Marietta. The warehouse houses Amrep, which manufactures a variety of chemical products, including automotive supplies, according to the company's Web site.

That’s according to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, which also reported Monday it took about four hours for the U.S. Environmental Protection agency to begin more extensive testing to detect chemicals kept at the warehouse in Marietta.

While officials say they didn’t detect toxic fumes, experts say chemicals are most likely to escape when a fire first starts. Cobb County Battalion Chief Scott Demkowski says, “We honestly don’t know what chemicals were released.”

In addition, the newspaper along with The Marietta Daily Journal reported officials are investigating a fish kill downstream from the warehouse.

Investigators haven’t determined what started the May 23 fire.

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Little Lamb
43931
Points
Little Lamb 06/02/14 - 12:05 pm
3
0
Woeful Reporting

The Associated Press should be embarrassed for releasing a story with such scarcity of details, and that a week and a half after the fire. Officials from the company know full well what chemicals were on site. The reporters should have gotten the name of these chemicals before running the story.

And editors of The Chronicle should not abet the AP by publishing such weak journalistic efforts.

Marinerman1
4319
Points
Marinerman1 06/02/14 - 12:18 pm
4
0
Yep, MSDS

Yes, for every chemical or compound in that facility, there should've been a matching MSDS - Material Safety Data Sheet. Same thing for OTR trucks. When the State did the audit @ the weigh station in Columbia County, we were amazed a just what kinds of hazardous materials roll through the County, each and every day.

Sweet son
9716
Points
Sweet son 06/02/14 - 01:10 pm
2
0
@LL

I watched some of the early video stories on Atlanta TV and I thought the same in that the reporters just wanted to publish video of the extensive fire. They didn't even take the time to ask what chemicals were involved and we also know that company employees knew what they were.

rmwhitley
5526
Points
rmwhitley 06/02/14 - 07:25 pm
0
0
The only requirement
Unpublished

to be an ap reporter is being born a liar then joining the democratic party. Years ago, you had at least a watchdog for the ap, UPI. They were were run out of the business by the characterless ap. Now you have equally unreliable "news" sources in the "huffington post" and "aol".

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