Georgia facing massive Medicaid shortfall

Friday, June 15, 2012 8:35 AM
Last updated 8:40 AM
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ATLANTA — A state health official says Georgia’s massive Medicaid program is facing a shortfall of more than $300 million in the coming fiscal year.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports the Georgia Department of Community Health plans to ask state lawmakers for about $308.2 million to make up the gap for fiscal 2013.

Vince Harris, the agency’s chief financial officer, updated board members on the situation Thursday.

The looming deficit comes at a time when the state health agency is also facing the addition of another 600,000-plus Georgians to its Medicaid rolls starting in 2014, as part of the program’s expansion under the health care law.

Commissioner David Cook called the budget numbers “very daunting.”

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Little Lamb
46040
Points
Little Lamb 06/15/12 - 08:54 am
4
2
Eligibility

Quote:

The state health agency is also facing the addition of another 600,000-plus Georgians to its Medicaid rolls starting in 2014, as part of the program’s expansion under the health care law.

Here is a good reason to elect Romney and elect Republican senators to take back control of the Senate.

We need to >strong>reduce eligibility for Medicaid, not increase it.

Ken2010
45
Points
Ken2010 06/15/12 - 10:32 am
1
3
Good Reason to Elect Republicans

The irony is that we are talking about the State of Georgia. A state that has been a conservative, Republican controlled state for decades. And a state where every state-wide elected office is headed by a Republican. Kind of ruins your argument in my opinion. Is the problem a lack of funds, poor planning or Republican mismanagement?

robaroo
755
Points
robaroo 06/15/12 - 10:57 am
0
1
Good Government

Regardless of which party is in power at the time, planning is required.

This is an example of good government. The Georgia Department of Community Health identified the problem in advance. Now the politicians have to find a way to deal with it.

burninater
9605
Points
burninater 06/15/12 - 01:42 pm
1
2
LL, the additional coverage

LL, the additional coverage requirements mentioned here are a red herring for expenditures at the state level:

The federal government will assume 100 percent of the Medicaid costs of covering newly eligible individuals for the first three years that the expansion is in effect (2014-2016). Federal support will then phase down slightly over the following several years, and by 2020 (and for all subsequent years), the federal government will pay 90 percent of the costs of covering these individuals.  According to CBO, between 2014 and 2022, the federal government will pay $931 billion of the cost of the Medicaid expansion, while states will pay roughly $73 billion, or 7 percent.

http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3161

Georgia's got a serious problem regardless of who's in office. And if wanted, the state could have ZERO obligation under Medicaid, as state participation in the program is 100% voluntary.

As a net recipient of federal tax revenue, however, I doubt Georgia lawmakers are going to turn down Medicaid funds by leaving the program.

burninater
9605
Points
burninater 06/15/12 - 01:54 pm
1
2
If Georgia stays in, a rough

If Georgia stays in, a rough estimate of its increased annual costs under the expansion of eligibility would be $73 billion / 7 years / 311 million people in the US x 9.8 million GA residents = $328,617, or less than 0.1% of the current shortfall.

Clearly, the future Medicaid expansion is not the problem here.

Little Lamb
46040
Points
Little Lamb 06/15/12 - 02:37 pm
5
0
Decades?

Ken2010 must have just recently moved to Georgia. The Democrats controlled state government from just after Reconstruction through the entire twentieth century. Republicans have only recently gained a majority in state government. They're not doing much better than the Democrats did, however.

Ken2010
45
Points
Ken2010 06/15/12 - 06:02 pm
1
3
Decades

LL, Sorry, I got carried away. Maybe it just seems like decades? My point is given that the Republicans have had this century to work their magic, the state leads the nation in multiple negative categories that are not reflective or indicative of a 'good reason to elect Romney and elect Republican senators to take back control of the Senate'. I'm also not in favor of one party control. Bush started with a modest budget surplus, a majority Republican Senate, House and Republican appointed majority Supreme Court for the first six of his eight years and we saw how that went down the tubes.

KSL
129904
Points
KSL 06/15/12 - 07:50 pm
2
0
Ken, it goes to credibility

Ken, it goes to credibility and with only your first post you lost yours. You deserve credit for apologizing.

Gage Creed
17256
Points
Gage Creed 06/15/12 - 09:01 pm
0
0
Ken2010...regarding the

Ken2010...regarding the current state of the union "Is the problem a lack of funds, poor planning or Democrat mismanagement?"

Ken2010
45
Points
Ken2010 06/15/12 - 09:28 pm
0
2
Credibility

Tough crowd! lol To be credible one must hold themselves to a certain standard of honesty. Being honest requires personal accountability. We could split hairs about how long Georgia has been a Red state or how powerful for how long? It began with Reagan in 1984. http://www.gagop.org/history-of-the-ga-gop/ http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004/pages/pre/GA/history.html

Ken2010
45
Points
Ken2010 06/15/12 - 09:33 pm
0
1
Democratic Mismanagement?

Cage Creed: A Republican might make that argument? I would like to hear the justification?

Little Lamb
46040
Points
Little Lamb 06/16/12 - 01:04 am
2
0
Back to the Subject

We got a little bit off-topic with the Dem vs. Rep thing. What is important to address is Medicaid eligibility. I say that we need to make it tougher to become eligible for Medicaid. That way, people in the middle will have to toughen up and pay for some of their medical expenses. Health care should not be free. We all need to pay something.

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