Schrenko seeks retirement money

Friday, Dec. 16, 2011 10:21 AM
Last updated 10:29 AM
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ATLANTA — A former Georgia schools superintendent who was convicted of stealing more than $600,000 in state public education funds is seeking some of her retirement money back.

Former state school superintendent Linda Schrenko  File
File
Former state school superintendent Linda Schrenko

Linda Schrenko said in a court filing this week to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that the government “illegally forwarded, seized and retained” about $195,000 of her retirement funds.

Prosecutors say Schrenko, of Columbia County, and a computer firm owner stole more than $600,000 in federal education money geared toward programs for honors students and two schools for the deaf. They say some went to Schrenko’s failed GOP gubernatorial campaign in 2002 and another $9,300 went toward a facelift.

She was sentenced to eight years in federal prison in 2006 after she struck a plea bargain in the middle of her trial.

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Chillen
17
Points
Chillen 12/16/11 - 10:47 am
0
0
When she pays back every

When she pays back every penny of the $600,000 she stole, then she can have her $195,000 in retirement funds. Skunk.

Little Lamb
49247
Points
Little Lamb 12/16/11 - 10:51 am
0
0
I read that she was helping

I read that she was helping fellow inmates in prison with their literacy. With time off for good behavior, she might be getting ready for an early release. Her claim of loss of retirement money might have some merit. I'm sure it was an accountant who calculated the amount and a lawyer who is leading the charge.

nothin2show4it
120
Points
nothin2show4it 12/16/11 - 10:55 am
0
0
She should forfeit her
Unpublished

She should forfeit her retirement for committing a crime like that. And yes chillen every penny. If you thought she wasn't a criminal before her arrogance for asking for it now should tell you.

Riverman1
94245
Points
Riverman1 12/16/11 - 11:11 am
0
0
If you spend over one year

If you spend over one year in prison you forfeit your entire military retirement pension.

Willow Bailey
20605
Points
Willow Bailey 12/16/11 - 11:20 am
0
0
No money for Linda.

No money for Linda.

tanbaby
1306
Points
tanbaby 12/16/11 - 12:32 pm
0
0
you have got to be
Unpublished

you have got to be kidding....she STOLE education money and has the nerve to want her retirement money???? and i'm sure the state will cave and give it to her....wonder if i steal from my company, will they then give me some retirement money?????

stillamazed
1488
Points
stillamazed 12/16/11 - 12:37 pm
0
0
I guess the word I called her

I guess the word I called her was considered inappropriate since my comment was removed but anyway, obviously jail has not changed her true colors, she is still self centered and money grubbing......I hope she doesn't get a penny!

billcass
1057
Points
billcass 12/16/11 - 12:48 pm
0
0
Riverman: That is incorrect.

Riverman: That is incorrect. I represent a large number of military members and there is no such rule. When a judge or a jury sentences a military member they can also sentence them to a punitive discharge, but if they don't, and the member is retirement eligible, they will get their retirement after release from confinement. I have represented several service members who got long periods of confinement but were able to keep their retirement once they were released.

Little Lamb
49247
Points
Little Lamb 12/16/11 - 01:06 pm
0
0
She was in the Georgia

She was in the Georgia Teacher's Retirement System for over 30 years. She became vested in the system when she hit 10 years. She is entitled to that retirement.

my.voice
5180
Points
my.voice 12/16/11 - 02:29 pm
0
0
Dear Ms Shrenko: In response

Dear Ms Shrenko:
In response to your reequest, we are granting a refund of your retiirement funds. Please note the following

Original Balance - 195,000
Management Fee - $50,000
Seizure Fee - 41,000
Taxes on Fees - 14,000
Court Fees - 75,000
Gall Fee - 14,999
TOTAL REFUND - 1.00

PS: This doesn't even begin to make us even. You stole money from funding for the deaf.

swcohen
625
Points
swcohen 12/16/11 - 02:30 pm
0
0
My HR person tells me that

My HR person tells me that Schrenko is owed that retirement money regardless of the crime she was convicted of. Still, it'd be nice if it got tied up in court for another decade or two...

Riverman1
94245
Points
Riverman1 12/16/11 - 02:34 pm
0
0
BillCass, thanks for

BillCass, thanks for correcting me. What am I thinking of? Do the payments stop after one year of confinement? Is that it? I know there's something about being incarcerated over a year.

Riverman1
94245
Points
Riverman1 12/16/11 - 02:38 pm
0
0
SWCohen, I'd think she could

SWCohen, I'd think she could have civil suits brought against her to reclaim the $600,000.

Another thing to consider is her retirement is based on her highest years and those were when she was State Superintendent of Education where she was engaged in illegal activity. I don't think you should be able to count the years you were involved in criminal activity as your work years. Realize, she is going to get a huge pension if something isn't done.

David Parker
7923
Points
David Parker 12/16/11 - 02:36 pm
0
0
Long time ago, Linda worked

Long time ago, Linda worked as couselor at South Columbia along with my mother, they became friends. I can recall spending a few Saturday evenings at the Schrenko home watching Star Trek with her daughter while the adults played cards and what not. They may have even taken Square Dancing lessons, crazy kids.

Then I think about the crime she committed and the punishment imposed. I think her time in jail is adequate, and i say this because she is probably doing more time or the equivalent that a first time offending murderer will do.

Do judges typically impose a monetary punishment on murderers? I don't think that's a standard procedure (although i'm wrong a consistent amount of the time). I understand civil suits can be brought, but I'm not referring to that.

I say, if they don't impose monetary punishments of this nature to murderers, rapists, etc as a general rule, then why impose it for this ole gal b/c I can attest that she wasn't always the Dr. Evil that some here would have you believe. The only way I justify taking the 195k away from her, is to bring a civil suit against her, then garnish her retirement. But practicing a double standard doesn't sit right with me.

Riverman1
94245
Points
Riverman1 12/16/11 - 03:02 pm
0
0
I know her first husband and

I know her first husband and I've met her a couple of times. She was pretty nice. She just got caught up in it all. Now that was a sad one.

David Parker
7923
Points
David Parker 12/16/11 - 03:12 pm
0
0
Where's ole boy that owned

Where's ole boy that owned the computer firm? How did he fare after all said and done and how dirty were his hands?

createyourfuture
68
Points
createyourfuture 12/16/11 - 03:47 pm
0
0
Yes, Linda should pay back

Yes, Linda should pay back all the money she stole. Every nickel. However, she worked for, and earned her retirement. Now she may have to pay back that money out of her retirement, until her debt is paid. Once it is paid, then her retirement should belong to her.

Sargebaby
4693
Points
Sargebaby 12/16/11 - 04:38 pm
0
0
She's purdy, but purdy don't

She's purdy, but purdy don't make you intelligent! Intelligent folk know they can't beat the law! Yep, purdy.....but dumb!

billcass
1057
Points
billcass 12/16/11 - 04:42 pm
0
0
Riverman: Not sure what you

Riverman: Not sure what you are thinking of (heck, half the time I don't even know what I am thinking of) but when gets more than six months confinement their pay stops 14 days after trial (with some exceptions.) Also, you can't retire while you are in confinement, so the payment would not commence until you are released.

Riverman1
94245
Points
Riverman1 12/16/11 - 05:50 pm
0
0
Thanks, Bill Cass. If I ever

Thanks, Bill Cass. If I ever get locked up and my Army pay stops, I'll come see you. Seriously, that was interesting information.

Willow Bailey
20605
Points
Willow Bailey 12/16/11 - 09:05 pm
0
0
She isn't entitled to

She isn't entitled to anything. When you steal money, there should be complete restitution before qualifying to have any seized assets returned.

SMITHA
0
Points
SMITHA 12/16/11 - 10:32 pm
0
0
Pay her the money.

Pay her the money.

blues550
380
Points
blues550 12/16/11 - 11:55 pm
0
0
Vested LL? Really? Even
Unpublished

Vested LL? Really? Even from you not well thought out.

itsanotherday
0
Points
itsanotherday 12/17/11 - 12:06 am
0
0
Dittos Willow Bailey. A thief
Unpublished

Dittos Willow Bailey. A thief should have every penny seized until those stolen from are made whole.

RunningMan
346
Points
RunningMan 12/17/11 - 07:14 am
0
0
What about all the folks she

What about all the folks she stole from. When are they going to get the money that was taken from them by her?

Truth Matters
8097
Points
Truth Matters 12/17/11 - 07:57 am
0
0
I find it amazing how

I find it amazing how readers/posters want punitive action applied after the verdict for the crime has been rendered. I suppose you will hire her so she can pay her own way; refer her to your boss to hire her; like to see her on welfare then we all pay; or just let her die and go away. It goes without saying that she committed a horrible crime, one against children, no less; however, there is a reason we allow the criminal justice system to seek redress when a crime has been committed against citizens. If we intend to continue to punish people after they serve their time, then skip the courts and leave them on the streets. Now, you don’t have to invite her to dinner, you don’t have to go to the square dance with her, but once time is served, that should be the end of it. If you people were the Christ whose birth we are preparing to celebrate, none of us would have redemption.

Truth Matters
8097
Points
Truth Matters 12/17/11 - 08:00 am
0
0
Oops! I intended to post,

Oops! I intended to post, "after the sentence has been rendered"..

getagrip
0
Points
getagrip 12/17/11 - 08:38 am
0
0
The portion of the retirement

The portion of the retirement she contributed should be hers to be used as repayment for the money she stole. The much larger matching portion her employers paid should be returned to the State and the taxpayers who provided the funds for the expense. Maybe prison life has been difficult on her appearance and she needs another facelift. I certainly don't want any more of my tax dollars funding her vanity.

Willow Bailey
20605
Points
Willow Bailey 12/17/11 - 09:12 am
0
0
Truth Matters: The real

Truth Matters:
The real purpose of putting someone in jail for their crimes is not a punishment of marking time. It is so they will have a serious enough consequence for their former actions, have time to reflect, make true repentance as in having a changed heart and become a new and better person. Without those things happening, they usually return to society and continue to harm themselves and others. This is particularly true regarding stealing.

It's interesting that you bring up Christ but you have mistakenly attributed wrongly to what He says in the matter of stealing from others.

Truth does matter, so you should know that genuine repentance leads to a desire to redress wrongs. Here is just one example:

In Luke 19. Jesus is visiting Zacchaeus’s home, and the people who know the chief tax collector to be a wicked and oppressive man are beginning to talk about His associating with a sinner . “But Zacchaeus stood up and said to the Lord, ‘Look, Lord! Here and now I give half of my possessions to the poor, and if I have cheated anybody out of anything, I will pay back four times the amount.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Today salvation has come to this house, because this man, too, is a son of Abraham. For the Son of Man came to seek and to save what was lost’” (verses 8-10). From Zacchaeus’s words, we know: 1) he had been guilty of defrauding people, 2) he was remorseful over his past actions, and 3) he was committed to making restitution. From Jesus’ words, we understand that 1) Zacchaeus was saved that day and his sin was forgiven, and 2) the evidence of his salvation was both his public confession and his relinquishing of all ill-gotten gains.

Zacchaeus repented, and his sincerity was evident in his immediate desire to make restitution.

drivenslow
0
Points
drivenslow 12/17/11 - 10:23 am
0
0
utterly unbelievable and some
Unpublished

utterly unbelievable and some of you are screaming that shes entitled to it.......

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