Georgia man killed at train crossing

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WINDER, Ga. -- A 41-year-old Gwinnett County man was killed Tuesday afternoon after his Ford F-150 was struck by a CSX train at a railroad crossing on North Beulah Street in Winder, according to Rachel Love, a spokeswoman with the Winder Police Department.

The man, who police are not identifying because his family has yet to be notified, approached the marked railroad crossing about 2:25 p.m. and sat on the tracks until the train hit the driver’s side of the truck.

Passersby called 911, and police arrived moments later, pulling the deceased man from the truck.

Witnesses said the man seemed to stop before the crossing and then slowly rolled up onto the tracks, Love said.

“According to witnesses, the lights were functioning,” Love said. “The train was making its noises, and everything was functioning the way it should. ... There was nothing in front of him or behind him that would have impeded him from moving his truck off the tracks.”

Authorities don’t know if the man lost consciousness or suffered another type of medical problem.

CSX is investigating the cause of the crash, Love said.

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Vito45
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Vito45 11/30/11 - 12:05 pm
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Let's hope it was natural

Let's hope it was natural causes and he didn't deliberately end his life that way. My condolences to the family and the train operator. He will also carry this with him.

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