Witnesses say propeller fell off plane that crashed, killed N.C. physician at Augusta Regional

Tuesday, Aug 2, 2011 10:46 PM
Last updated 11:44 PM
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A preliminary report by the National Transportation Safety Board reveals that witnesses saw a malfunction that led to a fatal plane crash at Augusta Regional Airport in July.

Dr. Thomas S. Wilson, 53, of Mooresville, N.C., was flying out of Augusta Regional when he crashed his single-engine Mooney 20 after the plane malfunctioned July 18.

Witnesses told the NTSB they "observed the propeller separate from the airplane and fall to the ground, followed by the airplane in a nose down spiral."

The pilot, who flew back and forth from Mooresville to Burke Medical Center in Waynesboro, Ga., for NES Healthcare Group, had been involved in a previous gear-up landing accident with the same plane April 11.

During the crash, the plane sustained substantial damage to the propeller and the fuselage.

Maintenance employees who worked on the airplane told authorities they had replaced the three-blade propeller with a two-blade propeller two days before the fatal crash.

The purpose of the July 18 flight was to take the airplane to 8,000 feet to see whether everything operated correctly before Wilson flew the plane back to North Carolina.

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Vito45
-2
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Vito45 08/02/11 - 10:17 pm
0
0
Sounds like a lawsuit to me.

Sounds like a lawsuit to me.

Crime Reports and Rewards TV
33
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Crime Reports and Rewards TV 08/02/11 - 10:40 pm
0
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Yep. Cheap maintenance can

Yep. Cheap maintenance can lead to expensive news coverage.

nothin2show4it
120
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nothin2show4it 08/03/11 - 04:10 am
0
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Boy I'd like to see the rest
Unpublished

Boy I'd like to see the rest of that report and who services the airplanes at the airport.

rmwhitley
5547
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rmwhitley 08/03/11 - 04:49 am
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Now people understand why I
Unpublished

Now people understand why I walk.

Carleton Duvall
6308
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Carleton Duvall 08/03/11 - 05:58 am
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The plane was not serviced by

The plane was not serviced by local mechanics.

Lori Davis
1006
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Lori Davis 08/03/11 - 07:27 am
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When my ex husband and I used

When my ex husband and I used to fly, the mechanic always went up in the plane with the pilot after repair. This always showed that he was comfortable with his work. This always made me feel good because we did a lot of flying in those days.

Lori Davis
1006
Points
Lori Davis 08/03/11 - 07:36 am
0
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When my ex husband and I used

When my ex husband and I used to fly, the mechanic always went up in the plane with the pilot after repair. This always showed that he was comfortable with his work. This always made me feel good because we did a lot of flying in those days.

bruab
4
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bruab 08/03/11 - 08:04 am
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Uhhhhh..... parachute?

Uhhhhh..... parachute?

sfoushee
0
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sfoushee 08/03/11 - 09:44 am
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Parachute's need room to

Parachute's need room to deploy. If he had one, it wouldn't have helped. Airplanes are very effective gliders without power, but unfortunately, this airplane had not attained enough altitude to have sufficient air speed for a safe glide back to the runway. Very sad. My understanding was the Dr. was a very accomplished pilot.

Vito45
-2
Points
Vito45 08/03/11 - 11:16 am
0
0
OT, but once upon a time

OT, but once upon a time there was work being done on ballistic chutes for small aircraft. There was actually a market for them with ultralights if I'm not mistaken, but I even saw in Popular Mechanics or the like some initial design speculations on ones for larger craft.

Sweet son
11651
Points
Sweet son 08/03/11 - 01:29 pm
0
0
nothin2show, try this for

nothin2show, try this for starters;http://www.ntsb.gov/aviationquery/brief.aspx?ev_id=20110718X33733&key=1

http://registry.faa.gov/aircraftinquiry/NNum_Results.aspx?NNumbertxt=777CV

There are two airports close to Mooresville. One called Lake Norman Airpark and the other probably a government owned one at Concord, NC. If you google them the FBO at the airport is usually where pilots seek care for their planes although the doctor could have gone to many others for his repairs.

j-campbell
2
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j-campbell 08/04/11 - 11:44 am
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I think it is pretty clear

I think it is pretty clear from the NTSB document ( http://www.ntsb.gov/aviationquery/brief.aspx?ev_id=20110718X33733&key=1 ) that he had the repair work from the April 2011 accident done here in Augusta since that's where the accident occurred. Also, the report quotes local mechanic(s) as saying they had replaced the damaged 3 blade prop with a 2 blade prop. I'm no aircraft mechanic, but I am a licensed pilot, and I wonder why if the plane was designed for a 3 blade prop, would you then install a lighter 2 blade prop. The NTSB report quotes witnesses as saying that the engine seemed unusually loud -- perhaps over revving?

commonsense-is-endangere
43
Points
commonsense-is-endangere 08/03/11 - 04:19 pm
0
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appears the previous crash of

appears the previous crash of this aircraft may have had a lot to do with this mishap.

bruab
4
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bruab 11/04/11 - 10:53 am
0
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"The purpose of the July 18

"The purpose of the July 18 flight was to take the airplane to 8,000 feet to see whether everything operated correctly..."

It appears we now have the answer to that question.

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