Ga. considers 'more inclusive' Civil War markers

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DALTON, Ga. — New markers being placed across Georgia are recognizing the Civil War history of long-ignored groups such as women, blacks and Southerners loyal to the Union.

The latest marker was dedicated Thursday at the site in Dalton where Confederate Maj. Gen. Patrick Cleburne proposed freeing black slaves who were willing to fight in badly outnumbered Southern ranks. That idea was quickly rejected by high-ranking Southern leaders committed to protecting slavery.

Confederate President Jefferson Davis ordered Cleburne not to discuss it.

The president of the Georgia Historical Society, W. Todd Groce, says the monument is one of about a dozen markers trying to tell a more inclusive history of the conflict. Charlie Crawford of the Georgia Battlefields Association says the rejection of Cleburne's proposal shows the Civil War was fought over slavery.


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