Man accused of growing marijuana surrenders

Friday, Feb. 25, 2011 12:15 AM
Last updated 4:06 PM
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NORTH AUGUSTA -- A North Augusta man accused of growing marijuana in his home has turned himself in, North Augusta Public Safety Lt. Tim Pearson said this afternoon.

Brown  Special
Special
Brown

Matthew Brown III, 29, of 1131 Carolina Ave., is being held in the Aiken County jail, awaiting a bond hearing.

North Augusta Public Safety obtained an arrest warrant Wednesday for Brown. The warrant charges Brown with manufacturing marijuana and manufacturing marijuana within half mile of a park.

According to an incident report, Brown's landlord said he was performing maintenance work on the dishwasher about 4 p.m. Tuesday. While waiting for the dishwasher to cycle, the landlord started looking around the house. He noticed what appeared to be marijuana on the living room table, and then he heard fans running in a rear bedroom, the report says.

When he tried to look in the bedroom, he found the door was locked, so he used a credit card to enter the room. Inside, he saw several black lights and fans, along with several plants that appeared to be marijuana plants being grown, according to the report. 

Investigators said they executed a search warrant and saw what appeared to be marijuana in the bedroom, on the floor and dresser.

They seized 20 large and 60 small marijuana plants, 32 containers of liquid for growing marijuana, black lights, fans, temperature control devices and other items for growing marijuana, the report says. They also bagged a loose, green, leafy substance that was in the living room and bedroom, according to the report.

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Riverman1
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Riverman1 02/26/11 - 09:23 am
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"The landlord has the right

"The landlord has the right to inspect the residence if he has reason to believe that illegal activity is occurring on his property."

Oh so Bubba, the apartment manager, wearing his cowboy boots and big belt buckle, spitting tobacco believes aliens from out of space are taking a nap in one of the bedrooms of his 21 year old female renter's apartment and decides to jimmy the locked bedroom door.

InChristLove
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InChristLove 02/26/11 - 10:56 am
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posted by dougk "Abducted

posted by dougk "Abducted victim in the room? I think a couple of you need to turn off the TV."

Oh really, well tell Jaycee Lee Dugard, Elizabeth Smarth, and Colleen Stan, that your think this notion is silly. I'm sure Jaycee for 18 years, Elizabeth for 9 years, and Colleen for 7 years, prayed someone would have became suspicious and investigated. Maybe they would have been rescued sooner.

corgimom
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corgimom 02/26/11 - 04:43 pm
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Riverman, if he sees illegal

Riverman, if he sees illegal drugs out in plain view, yes, he sure does.

It's HIS door in HIS house. The landlord owns that door. As long as the tenant has been given 24 hour notice that the landlord is entering his residence (and the landlord doesn't even have to do that if it's an emergency), it is perfectly legal.

The landlord could've kicked the door down or broken a window. Perfectly legal. Again, it's his door, his window, his property.

How DUMB is it to know that your landlord is entering your apartment and you have pot plants growing in there?

If someone wants complete privacy, they can buy their own place.

And in case you didn't know it, Riverman, decent landlords inspect their properties on a regular basis. If they care about their investment, that is.

Remember Dan Weigle?

It makes me laugh to imagine the idea of a landlord calling the police and having the following conversation:

"Hello, 911, what is your emergency?"

"I'm Joe Blow, I own apartments at XXX St, and I came into the unit to fix the dishwasher. I see evidence of drugs, and I hear fans running, could you please send an officer to open a locked bedroom door?"

"Joe Blow, don't waste our time with this nonsense. It's YOUR door, open it yourself. If it's something bad, call us back."

Click. HUMMMMMMMMMMMMM (dial tone)

Riverman1
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Riverman1 02/26/11 - 05:40 pm
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A landlord only has a right

A landlord only has a right to enter if you allow him to. If you are renting you have the same rights as a homeowner. No one can enter your apartment or rented house without your permission. Now it could very well be that as part of the rental agreement you give the person permission to enter the place. When I was in the Army and renting this was the case, but it certainly wasn't randomly done. There were announced entrys for things such as insect control, etc. That locked bedroom door was clearly a sign the man was not giving permission to enter. If he had a locked chest could the landlord have broken it open?

Now in this came apparently the man gave the owner permission to enter to make repairs which is fine. When the man came across the contraband he had no right to enter locked rooms. He should have called law enforcement and let them obtain a warrant if they wanted.

Riverman1
94246
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Riverman1 02/26/11 - 05:41 pm
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I bet a judge would like to

I bet a judge would like to hear about any police authorization to enter a locked premise given to a citizen over the phone because he thought something illegal was going on.

How about the landlord wants to check the apartment of the young single woman at about 2 AM? Gonna let him?

Riverman1
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Riverman1 02/26/11 - 05:59 pm
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South Carolina law says a

South Carolina law says a landlord can enter a rented place if he gives 24 hours notice. For emergencies, he can enter immediately if it is reasonable that entry is necessary.

In this case the man gave permission for the landlord to fix the dishwasher. It is to be reasonably expected the landlord's entry would be limited to the area around the dishwasher. Seeing the contraband could have caused him to call the police, but it was unreasonable for him to enter locked areas.

What was his reason for going in the locked bedroom? He heard fans on? He thought marijuana was back there?

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