Candidate demands student citizen verification

Friday, May 14, 2010 4:44 PM
Last updated 4:47 PM
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ATLANTA - - Republican gubernatorial candidate Eric Johnson fired another volley today  at the University System of Georgia for not agreeing to verify the citizenship of all of the 300,000 students attending the state's 35 public colleges - - this time for quibbling over the costs.
Earlier in the week he had called on the system to check after a campus traffic stop revealed that Kennesaw State University junior Jessica Colotl was an illegal alien. She had been admitted to the school before the University System began asking applicants their citizenship status two years ago.
Today Johnson responded to a Morris News Service story that quoted Chancellor Erroll Davis as saying spending $25 to check the citizenship of every student would total the salaries and benefits of 20 professors.
"If you ask this University System 'is it worth 20 professors to check the backgrounds of students?' I don't think you'll get too many yeses," Davis said Tuesday.
Johnson countered today that the cash-strapped system could use inexpensive means to verify citizenship.
"This is a typical bureaucratic response. First and foremost, we cannot afford to simply ignore the law, and it is unacceptable to brazenly dismiss the responsibility of enforcement," Johnson said. "Furthermore, it is beyond the realm of belief that it would cost $25 per student to verify citizenship."
Asking to see an applicant's driver's license, passport or student visa would cost little, he said, adding that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Citizenship and Immigration Services charges just 50 cents per name run through its database in the Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE) Program. SAVE was created to provide verification for state and federal government agencies wanting to identify the status of beneficiary applicants.
Immigration has grown as a political issue in recent years as the immigrant population has swelled. It became more potent with the recent enactment of a law in Arizona that allows police officers there to check the citizenship of anyone they suspect of being an alien.

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Riverman1
83434
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Riverman1 05/14/10 - 06:22 pm
0
0
That was a condescending,

That was a condescending, presumptuous and inaccurate comment by Errol Davis. If he doesn't want citizenship status of students determined, why doesn't he just say so?

rjv
0
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rjv 05/14/10 - 06:32 pm
0
0
LOOK GUYS ! WE ARE PAYING FOR

LOOK GUYS ! WE ARE PAYING FOR THIS , AND I DON'T MIND AS LONG AS THEY ARE AMERICANS ! BUT WHY THE HELL SHOULD WE PAY FOR PEOPLE THAT ARE NOT HERE LEGALLY ? I THINK THIS IS FAIR AND RIGHT !!!

corgimom
32125
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corgimom 05/14/10 - 07:05 pm
0
0
Foreign students attend every

Foreign students attend every university in the country.

There is no law that says you must be a citizen of the US to attend college.

In fact, having foreign students is an important part of a university's accrediation.

College students have to show a picture id and prove residency as it is. A driver's license doesn't show citizenship anyway.

And people want to vote for this doofus?

Brad Owens
4396
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Brad Owens 05/14/10 - 08:18 pm
0
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corgimom, This is a good

corgimom,

This is a good idea. Why do you call him a 'doofus' for wanting to correct an obvious problem that is a crime?

Brad

disssman
6
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disssman 05/14/10 - 08:34 pm
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It is nice to know we pay our

It is nice to know we pay our professors about $375K a year. That is using davis's figures. Maybe we need to look at more than illegal aliens.

disssman
6
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disssman 05/14/10 - 08:36 pm
0
0
I forgot to mention. Does

I forgot to mention. Does anyone working for the state actually care about the taxpayers?

Trey Enfantay
9
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Trey Enfantay 05/14/10 - 08:44 pm
0
0
Once again corgimom missed

Once again corgimom missed the point of the letter and just went trolling for some attention. Of course foreign students are allowed and encouraged to attend colleges and universities in the US. The problem is illegals getting in-state tuition rates if not outright scholarships. Let them attend, just pay the appropriate tuition scale.

J.W.
2
Points
J.W. 05/14/10 - 09:00 pm
0
0
Go to any other country in

Go to any other country in the world and I bet YOUR citizenship will be verified before you cross the border. They will know who you are, where you are from, where you are going and how long you are going to stay! Here its: Illegals,terrorists,parasites of all kind....Come On Down! Eric Johnson's plan sounds like nothing more than good logic to me!

30cal
0
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30cal 05/14/10 - 09:04 pm
0
0
checking citizenship should

checking citizenship should save money ,resources and help eleminate over crowded class rooms .YOU can bet this felon is not paying full tuition and maybe has grants and student loans that could go to wards an americans fees it seems we educate the world less AMERICA

TakeAstand
13
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TakeAstand 05/14/10 - 10:01 pm
0
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wow, suprising comment form

wow, suprising comment form corgi. Yes foreign students attend every college and no its not against the law to not be a citizen to attend college. But it is against the law to attend college or be in this country if you do not have citizenship or permission such as through a visa. I dont think its a bad idea if its cost effective to enforce the law! We have enough freeloaders here that are American citizens, we don't need anymore. And I would say at least they are getting an education as American freeloading baby,makers don't and only make more freeloaders, but then will they be paying taxes, ss and that stuff when they get a job after school, or take their free education back to their country while some citizens here are struggling to pay for college?

afadel
490
Points
afadel 05/14/10 - 10:08 pm
0
0
hell, let's just turn the

hell, let's just turn the country into a police state and have everyone who uses a road, a rest stop, a water fountain, an emergency room or a public recreational facility prove citizenship on demand. You did not have your passport and birth certificate when you got injured at work and transported to the ER? No treatment here, friend. If you're going to enforce immigration law, provide a path to citizenship for the millions of people working here.

Asitisinaug
3
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Asitisinaug 05/15/10 - 04:50 am
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Corgimom, foreign students

Corgimom, foreign students attend our schools or foreign Visa's and pay higher fees. He is trying to stop illegal aliens who are breaking the law by being in our country from taking up space in OUR public colleges which are greatly suplemented by tax dollars. And, afadel, why should those who have entered illegally be allowed citizenship prior to those in line waiting to do it legally. ALL illegal aliens have broken the law just by entering illegally and they did so knowing they were breaking the law and you wish to give them citizenship as a reward? Ridiculous!! Any of them who have broken any laws other than entering illegally should IMMEDIATLEY be deported. The others who are working to be productive should maybe have some type or work visa issued, pay taxes for being here, and maybe have a plan for earning citizenship after a few years and passing all other tests, etc. to include speaking english. However, to put them on a path to citizenship ahead of others is ridiculous as they are not deserving. The only dufus in this article is the professor who is either ignorant or flat out lying as citizneship can easily be checked by employers at no cost to them so it certainly can be checked by schools.

NewHere
0
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NewHere 05/15/10 - 06:26 am
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Comments like this is what

Comments like this is what give the south a bad name...

Brad Owens
4396
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Brad Owens 05/15/10 - 08:12 am
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NewHere, Please explain how

NewHere,

Please explain how wanting to be sure non-U.S. Citizen students have proper visas is bad? Please tell me how this will hurt anyone not breaking the law.

Am I missing something here?

I mean, lets just throw out the rules about ACT and SAT test scores while we are at it. And tuition, why pay it? Make cheating ok. I mean if the FEDERAL LAW doesn't mean anything to these 'edcuators' then why obey their own rules?

The police state comments are pretty funny too. I live and work overseas. I travel a lot and everywhere I go I make sure I have the proper visas to go. Why should we not enforce the laws that are there to protect our citizens?

Please explain which comments you take offense to or feel makes the 'south' look 'bad.' I guess if you consider wanting to have a country of ENFORCED laws as making the 'south' look bad, you're right. But that is an idiotic stance to take.

Brad

NewHere
0
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NewHere 05/15/10 - 09:30 am
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Brad is not the subject but

Brad is not the subject but the tone.

Little Lamb
45763
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Little Lamb 05/15/10 - 10:06 am
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An article in "Across

An article in "Across Georgia" says that Señorita Colotl was detained for driving without a license in Cobb County. During a quick background check, her illegal status was discovered and she was turned over to Federal Immigration officials. Immigration officials have turned her loose, telling her that her deportation hearing is delayed for a year. Do you think she will show up for class at Kennesaw State this fall?

She falsely claimed to be a Georgia resident in order to obtain state benefits of reduced tuition. That should be a crime in and of itself.

Here is the link:

Across Georgia

NewHere
0
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NewHere 05/15/10 - 10:25 am
0
0
Brad is not the subject but

Brad is not the subject but the tone.

KSL
128653
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KSL 05/15/10 - 12:08 pm
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She wasn't just breaking one

She wasn't just breaking one law, was she. Swift and certain punishment. Then follow the trail to the rest of her family. Do the same to them.

KSL
128653
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KSL 05/15/10 - 12:14 pm
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What is the cost of showing

What is the cost of showing your visa, corgi?

KSL
128653
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KSL 05/15/10 - 12:15 pm
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If I were a resident of

If I were a resident of Georgia, I would be concerned with having a Chancellor with that attitude.

DanK
779
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DanK 05/15/10 - 01:32 pm
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The overall idea is worse

The overall idea is worse (and more costly) than the Chancellor stated. Verifying the citizenship of every student would require a huge amount of personnel and institutional resources (space, supplies, computing, and time). Because, obviously, you can't just *ask* someone on a form if they are a U.S. citizen or in this country legally. They'll just check the box indicating they are here legally. So that is not verification. To verify, you must go through elaborate and time consuming procedures that involve meeting with the person, examining their papers, *authenticating* that their papers are not fake, running checks on them in national databanks, etc. Not just for people who admit they are from another country, but on everyone.

So that raises many other issues. The most important is -- is this the responsibility and appropriate function of our universities?

Why not require the same thing of every business -- you must *verify* every single person you hire. Not just the one who looks Hispanic or Asian or Middle Eastern, but every single one. Because you gotta be sure to catch the ones from Europe, Scandinaviam Canada, Australia, Russia, etc, etc.

And why not require that of all the grade schools, hospitals, libraries, airlines, etc., every institution or agency that serves the public? Why not require that realtors *verify* every person who wants to rent an apartment, require auto dealers to *verify* the legal status of every person who wants to buy a car or truck, every grocery require papers before you can buy food, etc. -- because hey, all those terrorists rent houses or apartments, buy vehicles, buy food and other stuff.

The universities in Georgia now ask applicants to indicate whether they are U.S. citizens. But the notion of every institution, agency, or business having to *verify* the people who walk through their doors involves more than Eric Johnson implies.

And in reality, for Johnson, this s just a convenient hot button topic for his campaign. His only real interest is getting elected.

lsmith
105
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lsmith 05/15/10 - 01:43 pm
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One important aspect to
Unpublished

One important aspect to consider in this is, of course an illegal alien taking the place of an American Citizen. Many students apply to colleges every year and many are turned aside due to over crowding. Anyone who thinks an illegal alien should be given a priority over a citizen needs to get a grip.
It's just one excuse after another in playing off the larger issue of requiring EVERYONE to be in this country legally or be deported to the country from which they have maintained proper citizenship.
Corgi.....I certainly don't think Eric Johnson is a doofus. Our elected officials in government, charged with responsiblity to write and enforce our laws should be at the forefront of the effort to do the right thing. When they don't, they set a bad example for all.

Asitisinaug
3
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Asitisinaug 05/15/10 - 02:24 pm
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DanK, employers are now

DanK, employers are now requred to verify citizenship status of employees by using e-verify which in most states is free to employers. Sutdents registering simply must show a proper government ID, visa, students visa or passport and their status will easily be determined. The only issues you raised were the false ones dreamed up somewhere. As for your comments requiring that others should verify citizenship, that already takes place for example if you go to buy a home. However, we are talking about tax payer funded public schools and all of the services funded by taxpayers are done so for American citizens not for persons illegally entering our country. Verification is simple and can easily be acomplished during student registration with minimal to no expense. Once registration is completed, the names and ssn or other relivant numbers are then transfered through e-verify. The savings would be FAR GREATER than the expense and if it did take a couple of people to complete then that would allow for a couple of more government jobs, something all liberals are for.

DanK
779
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DanK 05/15/10 - 02:58 pm
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I'm sorry, but I wasn't clear

I'm sorry, but I wasn't clear I guess. Simply askiung someone to flash a piece of paper is not verification. E-verify is not verification either. I have to determine if the person sitting in front of you is in fact the person named on whatever document they are flashing. All e-verify does is check a number against a name, but it cannot tell you if the person applying for the job or filling out an application for school is that person. Verification requires more than a cursory check of e-verify.

Realtors do not verify your citizenship, nor do banks or other businesses. What they do s look at the Social Security Number you wrote down, check that the name on the form matches the name on your drivers license, etc. That s not verification. Anyone can get a fake birth certificate online, use that to get a drivers license or anything else.

If you had to verify that your 17 year old child is a legal US citizen, because he's applying for college, consider what you'd have to produce in order to do that. And consider what a university would have to do in order to verify that the papers yu provide are in fact authentic, that the teenager applying is in fact the person who has turned in those papers, etc. Running a number through e-verify is not going t do that.

It seems ludicrous, but asking universities to *verify* that the person showing up at their door is in fact in this country legally involves a lot more than just a quick check of a database.

Hospitals receive federal and state funds. How about you have to produce your birth certificate and two picture IDs plus your social when you are rolled into the emergency room after an accident. The bus system is publically funded. Should it only be for U.S. citizens? You gonna have bus drivers authenticate riders? Museums and libraries are publically funded. You going to have librarians asking everyone who walks through the doors to produce a bunch of documents to prove they are U.S. citizens?

And your argument about taxpayers is specious. Even illegals in this country pay taxes on food, utilities, clothes, gas, everything they buy. Their dollars go into the public till just like yours do. Not as much as you, but probaby enough to cover the difference between in-state and out-of-state tuition.

Plus the fact that the number of illegals enrolled in our universities is tiny. You are probably talking about less than a handful in the entire university system. Most foreign students are graduate students, and those students are thoroughly documented. To allocate many tens f thousands of dollars for a program that will save a few hundred each year is just not smart stewardship of taxpayer dollars.

The university system is reeling from years of massive budget cuts, and this proposal would cost a significant amount of money. Who is going to pay for it?

Little Lamb
45763
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Little Lamb 05/15/10 - 04:03 pm
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DanK wrote: It seems

DanK wrote:

It seems ludicrous, but asking universities to *verify* that the person showing up at their door is in fact in this country legally involves a lot more than just a quick check of a database.

It seems that verifying legal U.S. status would not be much more burdensome than verifying a student's high school graduation status or his SAT scores.

Little Lamb
45763
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Little Lamb 05/15/10 - 04:08 pm
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DanK wrote: . . . the number

DanK wrote:

. . . the number of illegals enrolled in our universities is tiny. You are probably talking about less than a handful in the entire university system.

Perhaps. But when a policeman picks one up on another charge (in this case, driving with no license) and turns them over to the INS, then deportation hearings should begin promptly (not a year from now) because the person is guilty of misdemeanors in addition to crossing the border illegally. In this case, the illegal alien was guilty of driving without a license and falsifying school enrollment applications. Probably several other laws as well.

Little Lamb
45763
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Little Lamb 05/15/10 - 04:14 pm
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Morris News Service wrote: .

Morris News Service wrote:

. . . after a campus traffic stop revealed that Kennesaw State University junior Jessica Colotl was an illegal alien.

It didn't take too much time or money for that policeman to verify that Señorita Colotl was an illegal alien. I'm sure the University System can do it cheaper than DanK alleges.

Riverman1
83434
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Riverman1 05/15/10 - 04:58 pm
0
0
I mean the whole premise by

I mean the whole premise by Erroll Davis is crazy. A college has to determine SAT scores as LL said, high school grades and in-state residency requirements for tuition determination. Davis is trying to be such a sweetheart liberal playing to the anti-Arizona crowd and those who don't want border enforcement.

If he can't determine his students' status, it's time to find someone who can. Davis continuing to be in charge of our universities is a definite political issue in the upcoming elections.

Ga Values
27
Points
Ga Values 05/15/10 - 05:13 pm
0
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“Washington politicians like

“Washington politicians like Nathan Deal have failed to protect our borders, and state politicians like Eric Johnson exempted the Board of Regents from laws requiring proof of legal status to receive state services,” Handel said.

J.W.
2
Points
J.W. 05/15/10 - 05:47 pm
0
0
What part of "illegally in

What part of "illegally in this country" is so difficult to understand?

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