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College students in Georgia to pay higher tuition

Increases to help state's budget shortfall

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ATLANTA --- Georgia college students will pay up to $1,000 more in tuition in the coming school year under increases passed by the state Board of Regents on Tuesday, a move that comes amid one of the worst state fiscal crises in recent history.

University of Georgia President Michael Adams attended Tuesday's Board of Regents meeting. His school was among the hardest hit. 
  Associated Press
Associated Press
University of Georgia President Michael Adams attended Tuesday's Board of Regents meeting. His school was among the hardest hit.

The tuition increases for the state's 35 public colleges and universities hit hardest at research universities: the Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Tech and the University of Georgia. Many students will pay $3,535 per semester, a 16 percent increase over last fall.

For students at other campuses, including Georgia Southern University, the University of West Georgia and Kennesaw State University, tuition will be $2,298 per semester, up 15 percent. At Augusta State, tuition will increase by $200 a semester for a total of $2,137.

For students at two-year colleges, the increase is $50, or about 4 percent, making tuition $1,199 a semester.

Lawmakers cut $227 million from higher education spending to help balance the books as the state's economy limps along. The increases are expected to raise about $80 million.

"Over the last few years, we have had an economic tsunami like none of us has ever experienced," Usha Ramachandran, the vice chancellor for fiscal affairs at the University System of Georgia, told the board.

The largest increases apply to entering freshmen, rising sophomores and fifth-year seniors who are not under the "Fixed for Four" guaranteed tuition program. The program, which promises students will pay the same tuition rate for four years, was suspended indefinitely for new students starting last fall to help generate more money.

Students who are still under the fixed tuition program -- rising juniors and fourth-year seniors -- will pay the same amount they did as freshmen.

The tuition rates do not include mandatory fees, books and housing for students, which can cost thousands more a year.

"I am utterly appalled," Georgia State University student Jesus Pulido said after the vote. "It's extremely unfair."

State funding for colleges and universities has been declining the past few years, with per-student funding falling from $8,191 in 2009 to $6,242 next year, about the same level it was in 1996. The difference has been made up with program cuts, layoffs, furlough days and tuition increases.

Chancellor Erroll Davis said he won't have a clear picture of how state cuts will affect each campus until June because the university system office just received final budget figures last week. Campuses are bracing for more staff layoffs and furloughs and further program reductions.

Gov. Sonny Perdue visited the meeting Tuesday but said little about the budget cuts that have left colleges scrambling to handle steadily increasing enrollment.

"It's my opportunity to say thank you for continuing to make this university system not one of the best, but the best in the nation," Perdue said.

35 public colleges to see tuition increase

Parents and students should brace for a 4 percent to 16 percent increase in tuition this fall at Georgia's 35 public colleges after Tuesday's vote by the Board of Regents, which oversees the University System of Georgia. Here is a look at the change in tuition per semester:

RESEARCH UNIVERSITY INCREASE TUITION

Georgia State $500 $3,535

Georgia Tech $500 $3,535

Medical College of Georgia $500 $3,535

University of Georgia $500 $3,535

STATE UNIVERSITY INCREASE TUITION

Albany State $200 $2,137

Augusta State $200 $2,137

Armstrong Atlantic $200 $2,137

Clayton State $200 $2,137

Columbus State* $300 $2,298

Fort Valley $200 $2,137

Georgia College* $300 $3,142

Georgia Southern* $300 $2,298

Georgia Southwestern $200 $2,137

Kennesaw State* $300 $2,298

North Georgia* $300 $2,298

Savannah State $200 $2,137

Southern Polytechnic* $300 $2,489

Valdosta State* $300 $2,298

West Georgia* $300 $2,298

STATE COLLEGE INCREASE TUITION

Abraham Baldwin $100 $1,347

College of Coastal Georgia $100 $1,347

Dalton State $100 $1,347

Gainesville State $100 $1,347

Gordon $100 $1,347

Macon State $100 $1,347

Middle Georgia $100 $1,347

Georgia Gwinnett College $100 $1,600

TWO-YEAR COLLEGE INCREASE TUITION

Atlanta Metro $50 $1,199

Bainbridge $50 $1,199

Darton $50 $1,199

East Georgia $50 $1,199

Georgia Highlands $50 $1,199

Georgia Perimeter $50 $1,199

South Georgia $50 $1,199

Waycross $50 $1,199

* State university with specialized missions

Source: University System of Georgia

Graduate program

On Tuesday, the Board of Regents also approved various graduate program rate increases the Medical College of Georgia had requested, which were about 4 percent to 5 percent of the medical and dental programs.

Incoming in-state School of Medicine students, for instance, will pay $11,239 per semester, an increase of $535 a semester, and School of Dentistry students will pay $6,538 per semester, an increase of $251 a semester, said William Bowes, the senior vice president for finance and administration.

-- Tom Corwin, staff writer

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Chillen
17
Points
Chillen 05/11/10 - 02:33 pm
0
0
Well by all means, lets just

Well by all means, lets just raise the cost of college and not focus on cutting expenses. Give me a red pen and a long weekend with their budgets, I could find some things to cut. Time to trim the fat.

Riverman1
86917
Points
Riverman1 05/11/10 - 02:58 pm
0
0
MCG increases the number of

MCG increases the number of their high level administrators by almost half and passes out 50% raises like it's not their money (it isn't). They hire one at $175 thousand a year whose job description is to build collaborations in the state. Hilarious.

kellybrown1015
0
Points
kellybrown1015 05/11/10 - 04:47 pm
0
0
16.5% increase??!!! It is

16.5% increase??!!! It is clear that they are opting for the easy choice of closing the budget gap by making the students pay a jacked-up tuition rate. The much tougher and nobler decision would be to make painful budget cuts where some folks won't get what the programs they want or the pay raises they want. Nobody in this system has the backbone to do that. I agree with chillen - get out the red pen and trim the fat first before sticking it to the students.

fatboyhog
2013
Points
fatboyhog 05/11/10 - 06:38 pm
0
0
Yeah, morons! Keep raising

Yeah, morons! Keep raising the tuition. The people running this state know that PELL will pay these costs, leaving those of us who get no financial aid holding the bag. Those of us paying taxes will pay for everyone else's education, yet will be unable to send our children because we don't "qualify." But as long as we can issue "refund" checks to buy votes, we really don't care about the "less fortunate" getting an education. The bottom line is, those that really want an education can't afford it, but we subsidize others. Instead of cutting costs and finding other ways to raise revenue, let's continually screw the student and the state workers. Furlough and raise tuition...idiots!

themaninthemirror
0
Points
themaninthemirror 05/11/10 - 07:04 pm
0
0
AMEN TO YOUR POST FATBOYHOG.

AMEN TO YOUR POST FATBOYHOG.

Chillen
17
Points
Chillen 05/11/10 - 07:14 pm
0
0
Yep, soon it will be only the

Yep, soon it will be only the upper class & rich and the "needy" (who get free government money) who go to college.

Everyone else won't be able to afford it.

Redistribution of wealth.

corgimom
34064
Points
corgimom 05/11/10 - 07:36 pm
0
0
They might as well learn in

They might as well learn in college that life is not fair, and that you have to pay your way.

"Those of us paying taxes will pay for everyone else's education, yet will be unable to send our children because we don't "qualify."

Oh, I don't know. It all depends on what you value- vacations, new cars, shopping at the mall, new this, new that- personally, I think it's a good thing. Perhaps taxpayers will no longer have to pay for immature teenagers to go and party on other people's money, and college will go back to what it used to be- a place for serious academic study.

Connor Threlkeld
882
Points
Connor Threlkeld 05/11/10 - 08:35 pm
0
0
I agree, people need to start

I agree, people need to start saving early and get their financial priorities in order. My actual expenses for seven semesters of books, tuition and fees to Texas Tech were around $30,000 (Fall 2002- Winter 2005). Under $50,000 including everything else (housing, food, car payment, insurance, etc). A projection by the South Carolina college savings program for my six-month-old son's college costs (public four-year university such as USC) is about $44,000 a year. According to the math, I need to put aside more than $600 every month all the way through his college graduation day just to cover his costs, assuming things don't get worse. I'm pretty fiscally responsible, but that's not easy, no matter how many movies you skip and no matter how long you drive your car.

InChristLove
22481
Points
InChristLove 05/11/10 - 10:09 pm
0
0
I agree with you Conner, you

I agree with you Conner, you can plan and save what little you can manage but tuition continues to rise every year. Corgimom, I don't know who you've been talking to but the average American is not out shopping at the mall, taking endless vacations, buying new cars every year, and not every student is immature partying on parent's money. You can teach a child to pay his way but working part-time and going to school full time still isn't enough to pay their way today.

fjcamp
0
Points
fjcamp 05/11/10 - 10:09 pm
0
0
I just paid my son's tuition

I just paid my son's tuition for a 4 credit summer class at ASU - $480 in tuition, $395 in fees, $875 total before we even look at books. The fees add up quickly and are ridiculous.

fatboyhog
2013
Points
fatboyhog 05/11/10 - 10:17 pm
0
0
Corgimom, I skimp and save. I

Corgimom, I skimp and save. I have a few cars, all paid for. I have a nice house. I HAVE WORKED FOR ALL I HAVE. Why should I bear the brunt of inept politicians and a state that spends money like drunken sailors? Have you ever seen how PELL Grants work. It's a sham.

Riverman1
86917
Points
Riverman1 05/11/10 - 10:22 pm
0
0
$44,000 a year is projected

$44,000 a year is projected for a public college in SC in only 12 years? If that's correct it's a shocker. Something has to change. I believe only about 1 in 10 people should go to college if college is going to be a true place of higher learning.

More training apprenticeships and short technical courses are what the majority of the population needs.

gagentleman
103
Points
gagentleman 05/12/10 - 04:58 am
0
0
well lets not forget the

well lets not forget the tuition increases were set up so the fat cats in charge could get huge raises,people riase cane about how much tax money goes to help the poor and i ll admit (the sorry butts who just bleed the system)but look at the tax dollars and fees we americans pay so these guys can be paid these outragous salaries.

oneconservativetoanother
5
Points
oneconservativetoanother 05/12/10 - 08:30 am
0
0
Planning to send your child

Planning to send your child to college? With grants, loans, work study programs, the government is so deep into my kids pockets they will be paying their way out of debt when their grandchildren are born. How can this increase be the best option? THE distribution of wealth is going to drive us into the poor house. Maybe then we can qualify to send them to college. It angers me to see what this administration (State and Federal) are paying themselves while the rest of us are loosing our jobs, homes and retirement. I say kick all of them out of the house and senate and get someone in there that will change "business as usual!"

corgimom
34064
Points
corgimom 05/12/10 - 08:54 pm
0
0
ASU is an incredible bargain.

ASU is an incredible bargain. Even with a 4% tuition increase (4%- give me a break) it can't be beat.

"I just paid my son's tuition for a 4 credit summer class at ASU - $480 in tuition, $395 in fees, $875 total before we even look at books. The fees add up quickly and are ridiculous."

$875 is VERY CHEAP for a college level course. And nowhere is it written that parents have to pay for college. And nowhere does it say that a college education is a right, or that everyone deserves it.

It took me 8 years to get my degree. If you feel that $875 is too much, then your son is welcome to get a job and pay for it himself.

Oh yeah, the average American IS at the mall. They ARE taking vacations. They might not be buying as much- but they are still buying.

"You can teach a child to pay his way but working part-time and going to school full time still isn't enough to pay their way today."

With the HOPE scholarship and Federal tax credits, they can't pay their way? I paid more for my 2010 car than it costs to go for 4 years to ASU- and people have no problems buying cars.

If you can find another accredited university that offers a $17,000 4 year college degree, by all means, send your child there.

$!7,000 is not a large student loan, especially when it's spread out over 10 years.

If you feel that $17,000- minus the HOPE scholarship money- in exchange for a college education and higher earning power for a lifetime, not to mention the intangible benefits of education, then you are under no requirement to attend.

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