Witless for the defense

Scott Roeder took one life, and threw his own away, to make a point -- and witlessly ended up being the point himself.

 

The crazed Kansas man shamelessly admitted that last May 31 he killed in cold blood in order to show that late-term abortionist Dr. George Tiller shouldn't kill.

It's an insane notion, and it took a Wichita jury only little more than half an hour to find Roeder guilty of it. For first-degree murder, prosecutors plan to seek a "hard 50" sentence for the 51-year-old, meaning 50 years without the possibility of parole.

Good riddance to that guy. If Roeder thought he would become a hero of the pro-life movement, he truly was deranged. He is what he is, and nothing more: a murderer. And no member in good standing of the pro-life community would think otherwise.

This lunatic speaks for no one, acts for no one, other than his unbalanced self.

In reality, he's an anti-hero. Now, his act will be used by a news media eager for pro-life gremlins in order to justify the caricature they sketch of those who fight to protect innocent life.

The truth is, those who perform violence in the name of pro-life are an anathema to us all. Because of that, such cretins are, ironically, held more accountable for their actions than are abortion providers. Indeed, more reasonable members of the pro-life movement in recent years have started asking some very good questions about what goes on in abortion clinics. For example: Are providers duly reporting to authorities when they see the unmistakable evidence of child molestation? At one point before his killing, Tiller was being asked that very question.

Despite his best effort, Scott Roeder isn't the point. Or any point, other than that there are lunatics among us. If he could kill Tiller to prove the cause of life, someone could also kill someone else for wearing yellow out of season. Guns don't kill people; crazy people kill people.

George Tiller should never have been shot down in cold blood. But he was the victim here, not abortion, and his death does nothing to ennoble the procedure.

 

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