The Artside: New exhibits for fall offer mix of all media

A new month means new art exhibits around town.

 

At the Midtown Market, the monthly first Thursday event from 5 to 8 p.m. Nov. 2 will benefit the Jud C. Hickey Center for Alzheimer’s Care.

The featured artist is Dan Dyches, and Fred Gehle will be signing the book In their Own Words, Augusta and Aiken Area Veterans Remember World War II. Gehle was the coordinator for the Veterans History Project for the Augusta-Richmond County Historical Society.

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The Gertrude Herbert Institute of Art’s annual fundraiser, Oysters on Telfair, returns for its 13th year from 7-10 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 2.

Guests in the gardens of Ware’s Folly will dine on Cajun cuisine, hear live music by the Crosstie Walkers and be able to bid on regional artists’ works in a silent auction.

Tickets are $75.

Visit ghia.ticketleap.com/oysters.

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The Artist Guild of Columbia County will present Art After Dark from 7 to 10 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 4, at the Columbia County Library. More than 50 guild members have created an array of pieces in various mediums including watercolors, oils, acrylics, photography, pottery, fiber arts, jewelry, and mixed media.

In addition, there will be a silent auction benefiting the guild’s scholarship for art students.

Art After Dark will be catered by the Silver Palm and feature live jazz by Fred Williams. There will be a cash bar with beverages from the Vineyard Wine Market.

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The North Augusta Artists Guild will have its 10th annual Fall into Art at the Arts and Heritage Center of North Augusta.

The works of 40 artists will be on display through Dec. 15. A reception will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 9.

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The Morris Museum of Art just opened a new exhibit of the works of “one of Georgia’s most important 20th century artists,” according to its website.

Hattie Saussy: The Rediscovery of an Artist features the works of one of the South’s leading impressionist painters. The Savannah native was born in 1890 and died in 1978 at the age of 87. She painted portraits, genre scenes and landscapes. The exhibition opened Oct. 21 and will be on display through Jan. 21.

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The Greater Augusta Arts Council’s 2017 legislative luncheon will be from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 9, at Sacred Heart Cultural Center. Guest speaker Randy Cohen will present on the results of a national survey that shows the economic impact of the arts, highlighting Augusta’s participation in it, according to a news release.

The Greater Augusta Arts Council completed the survey in 2016, and it showed nonprofit arts groups in Richmond and Columbia counties generated nearly $58 million in economic activity, the release said.

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New at the Aiken Center for the Arts are works by Aiken Artist Guild members Judy Adamick and Anne Smith. The display opened on Oct. 30.

Adamick’s pieces were inspired by a trip to Colonial Williamsburg, while Smith’s pen-and-ink and watercolor works have a rustic theme.

“I found that to be the perfect medium and companion to portray the rustic, weathered boards of old barns and buildings for which I have experienced a lifetime love affair. That appreciation continues to take me on many Sunday drives to discover those old treasures and to experience the excitement of things to come traveling down dirt roads,” she said in a news release.

A reception will be at 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 9.

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Coming up at the Sacred Heart Cultural Center is an exhibition of the works of Melanie Stokes, a retired art teacher, who enjoys painting in her backyard studio in Thomson and en plein air. She’s a member of the McDuffie Arts Council. A reception will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 9.

 

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